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Winter work

SunnyDays Carpet Cleaning

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Stuff will freeze no matter what you do. When I didn't have a heated garage I had a quick connect on my pressure gauge. I would always use this connect and take it in. Got tired of buying new ones. Just a tip!
 

Omar

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I used to store 3TM's outside...I've always wondered if we could invent a system that would start the van, and run it for a while with the heat on...even take it to next level and put a heater in the fresh water tank...heat the 120 gallons of water I have in there...water holds heat right? It wouldn't seem like more than a thermostat hooked to the ignition...and a full tank of gas in the van..and some diodes and shit..that's where I lose it....the f'ing diodes and shit...
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0049P2J1K/?tag=truck0b9-20

I think this one would work. Then you can have a wire coming off the battery or altenator to power up your heating device(weather you put it in the water or not). The water will hold heat buti think the cold plastic from the tank will dissipate it.
 

Dennis Anderson

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Was thinking this the other day. But was wondering if one could make a heating element for the trucks radiator. And use the vans heater cores to heat van. Would need thermostat control, circulator pump, and heater elements. Just plug into homes electric. Plus bonus easy start up in morning.
Over thinking it i know. but would be nice to have.
Doesn't cost nothin to dream up ideas.
Already invented. I know they were being used back in the 70's. Circulating heater through your vehicle's heater hoses. Check it out at their website http://www.fivestarmanufacturing.com/kat_s
I don't ever remember them being able to heat the inside of a vehicle though.
 
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keep it clean

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Already invented. I know they were being used back in the 70's. Gravity based heater that hooked up through your heater hose. Trouble would be that there would be nothing to circulate the water. The heaters used to be made by Kat I believe and were common in cold climates.
Guessing these were only used to heat the block not for comfort.
 

Dennis Anderson

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Guessing these were only used to heat the block not for comfort.
That was called a block heater, and were more effective for starting a cold car in severe cold. No, a circulating (heater hose heater) was never effective in keeping the inside temps of a vehicle warm. I don't think anything that Kat made served that purpose.
 

Bexiesbruv

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If you work for any property managers, ask them if they have a garage you can borrow or rent for a nominal amount. My biggest client (a property management company) offered me a garage last year, not realising I had already built one.
Webasto make a bunch of space heaters for vehicles. heat pumps and that sort of thing. Of little use going to the expense unless you insulate the vehicle. The one thing to remember is to keep your high pressure line of the bed of the van in the extreme cold. The metal will conduct cold right into the line and you will have a frozen line from the wind chill, in minutes (ask me how I know) I have 1000 watt block heaters in my trucks and vans and 750 watt in the cars and yes, they are just to help on cold starts. I also have battery blankets (electric also) to keep the battery good. I put up baton and fibre glass insulation under plywood on my GMC. The Dodge had spay foam insulation which is not as effective. I also have rear heat in the gmc but not the Dodge, so I do have to protect the high pressure line when moving in lower than -15c.
When I had no garage I had three heaters in the back and a bunch of moving blankets. They were all on different circuits and they ALL failed over a long weekend. Cost a heck of a lot of time and $'s for replacement fittings, heat exchanger and gauges.
 
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Bexiesbruv

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One thing I forgot is this, if you are not going down real low, then insulating the van might be enough. My van will stay at +1 or 2 C when the outside temperature is as low as -7c. over night The killer is wind chill. Keep the wind off the van and you stand a chance of surviving.
 

Bexiesbruv

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I am having day time night mares just thinking about all the stuff you have to do in the cold if you have no garage/shop.
Worse than a heater failing because of a breaker is the heater element failing but the fan keeps running because now you have cold air being circulated. Thats nasty.
 

Omar

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I am having day time night mares just thinking about all the stuff you have to do in the cold if you have no garage/shop.
Worse than a heater failing because of a breaker is the heater element failing but the fan keeps running because now you have cold air being circulated. Thats nasty.
You ever have to fill and empty with antifreeze everyday?
 

Bexiesbruv

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You ever have to fill and empty with antifreeze everyday?
I never did, but in hind sight, I should have. I would not have froze the truck. Even froze the gauges. Not sure if they can be fully protected. The glycerin (or whatever is in them) will freeze if cold enough.
If I had to do it again, I would
Try very hard to find a garage, even if not heated.
If I couldnt find or afford a garage then I would
Insulate the van.
invest in insulated blankets to cover the TM and put one in each door.
Have a heater inside the van and another inside the blanket laid over the TM. Put both on separate circuits.
Buy quality heaters that are capable of running 24/7

If all you are having for low temps is 24, even 20, then insulating the van and putting in a heater at night will be fine, I feel. Probably just the heater or just the insulation.
 

barefoot

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One thing I forgot is this, if you are not going down real low, then insulating the van might be enough. My van will stay at +1 or 2 C when the outside temperature is as low as -7c. over night The killer is wind chill. Keep the wind off the van and you stand a chance of surviving.
I thought "wind Chill" has to do w/ the winds effect on human skin.

I thought it has nothing to do w/ the equipment freezing?

Right or wrong...anybody?
 

keep it clean

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I thought "wind Chill" has to do w/ the winds effect on human skin.

I thought it has nothing to do w/ the equipment freezing?

Right or wrong...anybody?
Thinking wind strips the heat off of the exterior of the van. Sheet metal body just absorbs heat and wind removes it. Kinda like a heatsink
 

Bexiesbruv

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I thought "wind Chill" has to do w/ the winds effect on human skin.

I thought it has nothing to do w/ the equipment freezing?

Right or wrong...anybody?
Of course you are right. My use of a poor term and a bad example.
Still need to protect the van from getting too cold though. Nothing changes in that regard, as far as I am concerned. If its cold enough, the hose will freeze if left on the metal floor of the van.
 

Omar

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I never did, but in hind sight, I should have. I would not have froze the truck. Even froze the gauges. Not sure if they can be fully protected. The glycerin (or whatever is in them) will freeze if cold enough.
If I had to do it again, I would
Try very hard to find a garage, even if not heated.
If I couldnt find or afford a garage then I would
Insulate the van.
invest in insulated blankets to cover the TM and put one in each door.
Have a heater inside the van and another inside the blanket laid over the TM. Put both on separate circuits.
Buy quality heaters that are capable of running 24/7

If all you are having for low temps is 24, even 20, then insulating the van and putting in a heater at night will be fine, I feel. Probably just the heater or just the insulation.
my oil filled radiator heater has been working great during cold nights. It can bring the van up to 100° on the high setting. Its meant for a large room.
 
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Bexiesbruv

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Of course you are right. My use of a poor term and a bad example.
Still need to protect the van from getting too cold though. Nothing changes in that regard, as far as I am concerned. If its cold enough, the hose will freeze if left on the metal floor of the van.
I would tend to agree but in the strictest sense of the term I feel barefoot is right.
 

Omar

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If you can push heat you can push cold so windchill would make things colder.
 

Bexiesbruv

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If you can push heat you can push cold so windchill would make things colder.
Apparently not:
Taken from weatherimagery.com
There are a couple misconceptions about wind chill. The first is humidity does not noticeably affect a wind chill reading. In fact, in the newest formula used by the National Weather Service, the humidity reading was left out. The second myth is inanimate objects such as metal, steel, wood and plastics experience wind chill just like we humans do. This isn’t true. The only affect a cold wind has on these objects is that they cool off faster than had there been no wind. So as an example, if it’s -10°F outside with a -35°F wind chill, the metal flag pole will only cool to -10°F, but it will do so more quickly than had the wind not been blowing. The flag pole will not get any colder than the air temperature, no matter how fast the wind blows.
 
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Omar

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Apparently not:
Taken from weatherimagery.com
There are a couple misconceptions about wind chill. The first is humidity does not noticeably affect a wind chill reading. In fact, in the newest formula used by the National Weather Service, the humidity reading was left out. The second myth is inanimate objects such as metal, steel, wood and plastics experience wind chill just like we humans do. This isn’t true. The only affect a cold wind has on these objects is that they cool off faster than had there been no wind. So as an example, if it’s -10°F outside with a -35°F wind chill, the metal flag pole will only cool to -10°F, but it will do so more quickly than had the wind not been blowing. The flag pole will not get any colder than the air temperature, no matter how fast the wind blows.
So if you break the windchill it will stop an object from getting colder quicker, right?
 

Bexiesbruv

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So if you break the windchill it will stop an object from getting colder quicker, right?
I guess to say it correctly, break the wind and the metal will cool off slowly, yes. But according to that article, if its -10, the metal cannot get below -10 no matter how much the wind blows. It can just get there quicker if the wind blows on it. so that would be why my hose froze. Because the metal got to outside temperature which was something like -25c and probably pulled out any residual heat the hose had.