Why are cilindrical brush extraction power heads missing from the market? | TruckMount Forums #1 Carpet Cleaning Forums

Why are cilindrical brush extraction power heads missing from the market?

Alexis

New Member
Apr 5, 2020
10
1
3
44
San Juan
fastandcleanllc.com
Real Name
Alexis Bird
Hi all, specially you Mr. Allen,
My name is Alexis, I am pretty new in the industry, but I quickly got IICRC CCMT certified, now looking in to what's offered I can't understand why CRB's don't have a house attached to their interior, nor do they have solution jets. Sort of like the SANTOEMMA Power Brush, the Ashbys Metal Power Brush , Carpet Extractor PowerHead
 

OxiFreshGuy

Well-Known Member
Nov 12, 2016
2,104
1,488
113
Real Name
Boris Johnson
Business Location
United States
Because they want you to purchase the optional accessory for another $500.
 

OxiFreshGuy

Well-Known Member
Nov 12, 2016
2,104
1,488
113
Real Name
Boris Johnson
Business Location
United States
I was not on the manufacturing decision making committee. The housing you refer to, do you mean the splash plates ? Your CRB should've had those when you bought them. Solution sprayer is an optional accessory, granted you could build one yourself very cheap.
 

Alexis

New Member
Apr 5, 2020
10
1
3
44
San Juan
fastandcleanllc.com
Real Name
Alexis Bird
it still amazes me that no one wants to create a integrated system, less machines, and tools, that when combined deliver better results. They will steal most customers from their competition.
 

ACP

Well-Known Member
Apr 9, 2014
3,995
2,874
113
36
Washington
Real Name
Bjorn Marshall
Been saying this for a LONGG time. The edic ones are crap.

Someone needs to make a new unit with even just a single rotating brush, nicely placed jets, and 2in hose right up to a large manifold.

Tony Dang had a prototype I think about 5-6yrs ago but it didn't turn out too well.
 

OxiFreshGuy

Well-Known Member
Nov 12, 2016
2,104
1,488
113
Real Name
Boris Johnson
Business Location
United States
Well the other problem is brushes void carpet warranties
 

gborris

Active Member
Dec 27, 2018
376
106
43
Real Name
Grant Borris
Because even after you brush you still need to allow for adequate dwell time.
 

Alexis

New Member
Apr 5, 2020
10
1
3
44
San Juan
fastandcleanllc.com
Real Name
Alexis Bird
Of Course First Time brush and vacuum on, then pre spray and brush, without vacuum. Then you rinse, brush and extract, same tool.
i
I'm not proposing any changes to the basic carpet cleaning steps, just asking why tools don't integrate to demand less vaccum, less water and heat when combined thus making it easier to develop much more complete machines.
 

wandwizard

Randy Dockins
Premium VIP
Nov 12, 2008
8,643
3,385
113
Real Name
Randy Dockins
Business Location
United States
With all due respect is this a conspiracy theory or a fact. Do you know if they were good at all?
I can't pretend to know how well all of the above models work. I purchased one very similar to the third one made by Clarke in the early 90's. It was very big with a large brush and now I know it was not well suited to the machine they sold it with. All I can say is I was never really happy with it primarily because it left the carpets sopping wet even with extra dry passes. It did a very poor job overall. Perhaps with a more powerful machine than I was using at the time, which also was made by Clarke, it might have done better. Those things have been around for a long time. I don't know of personally a single one that has become really popular among professional cleaners. Most of us either opt for a good wand or some type of rotary extractor which are usually 2 or 3 times the cost of a power brush extractor or use of a crb before extraction.

I don't know the productivity rates of those machines or how well they all perform on ALL TYPES of carpets. I could only give an honest opinion if I actually used them all for at least several different jobs. The Clarke power brush pretty much turned me off from ever buying another one and found it a mistake and a complete waste of money. Maybe some of the other above models work better.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Alexis

Alexis

New Member
Apr 5, 2020
10
1
3
44
San Juan
fastandcleanllc.com
Real Name
Alexis Bird
I would've thought that vacuums are way more powerful today.
Anyways thanks for your comments.

I can't pretend to know how well all of the above models work. I purchased one very similar to the third one made by Clarke in the early 90's. It was very big with a large brush and now I know it was not well suited to the machine they sold it with. All I can say is I was never really happy with it primarily because it left the carpets sopping wet even with extra dry passes. It did a very poor job overall. Perhaps with a more powerful machine than I was using at the time, which also was made by Clarke, it might have done better. Those things have been around for a long time. I don't know of personally a single one that has become really popular among professional cleaners. Most of us either opt for a good wand or some type of rotary extractor which are usually 2 or 3 times the cost of a power brush extractor or use of a crb before extraction.

I don't know the productivity rates of those machines or how well they all perform on ALL TYPES of carpets. I could only give an honest opinion if I actually used them all for at least several different jobs. The Clarke power brush pretty much turned me off from ever buying another one and found it a mistake and a complete waste of money. Maybe some of the other above models work better.
[/QUO
 

OxiFreshGuy

Well-Known Member
Nov 12, 2016
2,104
1,488
113
Real Name
Boris Johnson
Business Location
United States
It's also helpful to have a light and maneuverable wand, with a cyldrinical brush it would be difficult to do edges and corners.

Production rate would also be slower.

Rotovacs with a brush head essentially accomplish what you're talking about just not cylindrical.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Alexis

wandwizard

Randy Dockins
Premium VIP
Nov 12, 2008
8,643
3,385
113
Real Name
Randy Dockins
Business Location
United States
I would've thought that vacuums are way more powerful today.
Anyways thanks for your comments.
The power of the vacuum depends on what vacuum motor or motors have been put in each machine. Yes, vacuum motor technology has definitely improved. I was using a Clarke with dual 2 stage vacuum motors at the time, but clearly not as powerful as some that are out there today.

I don't think there is any kind of conspiracy against those machines or how many guys have actually purchased one. All I can say is most of us have been aware of them for years. There must be a reason why they really haven't taken off. I've been using a rotary type extractor on many jobs for a number of years. I think a lot of this boils down to productivity rates. How many square feet can you effectively clean per hour and still do a fantastic job with decent drying times? To be honest, rotary extractors aren't super productive, but they are super-efficient at cleaning hammered or trashed carpets. I think a really good wand is still to this day the more productive tool for HWE when we're talking sq. ft. per hour.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Alexis

Mama Fen

Well-Known Member
Jul 18, 2012
3,777
4,198
113
Real Name
no name
Business Location
United States
I'd guess that part of the problem is the damage that a brush head can do to tufted carpets. There are many vacuums out there that are notorious for being carpet-killers, because their brush rolls are far too aggressive. A tech who tries to scrub a patch of carpet too long just might owe the custy a new carpet.
 
  • Like
Reactions: wandwizard

Alexis

New Member
Apr 5, 2020
10
1
3
44
San Juan
fastandcleanllc.com
Real Name
Alexis Bird
CRBs do not void warranties. In fact there is one mill that REQUIRES the use of a CRB to maintain the carpet.
[/QUOTE

]I agree, that's why I wonder there's not at least the option to attach a vacuum hose to a CRB, the more powerful the vacuum the better surfactants would work on what they need to.
 

mrotto

Well-Known Member
Sep 1, 2009
2,183
1,369
113
Wisconsin
Real Name
Paul Ottensmann
Business Location
United States
my guess is that to integrate a CRB with a wand, the problem would be having a housing that would be tight enough to the carpet to get effective recovery. On commercial maybe, probably not residential

On the flip side, there are enough manufacturers out there that if it could be done, it would be on the market already. There is no shortage of *do dahs* in our industry.
 

mrotto

Well-Known Member
Sep 1, 2009
2,183
1,369
113
Wisconsin
Real Name
Paul Ottensmann
Business Location
United States
after further thinking, even if there was a tool that did both pile lifting and extraction, you would loose the dwell time pile lifting allows to loosen the soil. Just a piece of the cleaning pie