White cotton furniture

The Cleaning Artist

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Today we cleaned a 5 piece set imported from Italy at a cost(furniture not the clean) of 20k. We clean them every yr or 2. A tremendous amount of liquid spills and browning. All were removed and the furniture restored again to new condition. Much more difficult than cleaning a cheap viscose area rug. 4hrs to clean furniture and a $40k 14x16 wool rug.
 

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The Cleaning Artist

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I keep telling these clients to not have liquid spills if they value this furniture. Doesn't change a thing. They try to spot clean every spill and make the whole area brown.:vomit:
 

Scott W

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I hope you are applying a good protector that works well on cotton upholstery. Bridgepoint's Maxim Upholstery Protector with Dye-Loc comes to mind.

 
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The Cleaning Artist

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But of course, kinda makes it hard to clean in one aspect as the chemicals we apply bead up and want to run off. We have to treat and rub in every sq in then extract. The plus side is everything comes out. Now if we could just get them to stop trying to spot clean on it:eek:
 
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Joshua Johnson

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But of course, kinda makes it hard to clean in one aspect as the chemicals we apply bead up and want to run off. We have to treat and rub in every sq in then extract. The plus side is everything comes out. Now if we could just get them to stop trying to spot clean on it:eek:
Which cleaning solution did you use? Did it turn bright orangish-yellow when you got it wet?

I've come across several sofas like this and it freaks me out every time.
 

TillertheJohn

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Which cleaning solution did you use? Did it turn bright orangish-yellow when you got it wet?

I've come across several sofas like this and it freaks me out every time.
I believe TMF revive would work well on this. Being mindful to not over wet and dry quickly with fans.
 
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wandwizard

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Which cleaning solution did you use? Did it turn bright orangish-yellow when you got it wet?

I've come across several sofas like this and it freaks me out every time.
If you see a change of color it can be because of the cleaning agent that you are using or because of what has already been used on the fabric because residue left behind. My guess is on the above furniture the customer has been using some kind of cleaner or spotter that is alkaline so it may actually remove the spot and make it look better temporarily at least. When it dries out in an alkaline state it will begin to brown. That is true fabric browning. Cotton and other naturals need to either be cleaned on the acid side or a self-neutralizing treatment can be used effectively in a lot of cases. If I think there is even a remote chance of bleeding I always clean and rinse with an acid side cleaner and get it as dry as possible. I will towel the piece off a lot of times because cotton especially tends to absorb and hold onto moisture. The above fabric is super likely to brown so that would be my major concern with it. Yesterday I cleaned a couch that was black on white design. I knew for certain that the chances of that black bleeding into the white was VERY, VERY HIGH! I wasn't really concerned about browning, but I was super concerned about bleeding on that one!

As for yellowing, I suspect also a spotter that has some type of hydrogen peroxide could well have caused it. I suppose some other things might cause it, but peroxide would be my closest guess. I don't use H2O2 on any natural if I can help it and only then with extreme caution. A lot of our customers buy stain removers with "oxi" on the label and really have no idea why they shouldn't put it on that wool rug or that expensive cotton sectional. They also don't understand what harm over the counter stain removers can do to these fabrics just by being alkaline ph. Btw, a whole lot of otherwise good cleaning professionals don't either. A lot of us have had to learn the hard way and I'm including myself in that lineup. I remember vividly cleaning a multi-colored couch with a flower design in it years ago. Before I left the house it started to bleed like a slaughtered hog! I was very lucky I was able to correct it. I also used Matrix Finish First one time to attempt to clean a Haitian cotton chair back in the 90's. I had never even heard of Haitian cotton. That sucker turned dark brown on contact with the Finish First detergent with about a ph of 10! Again, I was fortunate enough that I at least did understand what was happening and I was able to correct it.

All that to say this again, Don't make it a habit to use chems made for carpet on upholstery unless you are 100% certain they are safe for what you're working on. Either you may wind up paying for it or your GL insurance is about to go UP! I bet you a dollar that a lot of cleaners have wound up purchasing furniture and rugs they've cleaned, but are ashamed to admit it. Be safe and learn all you can about it. Be especially careful with stain removers on naturals of any kind including naturals blended with synthetics. You simply can't get too crazy with naturals and a lot of vibrant colors and not get BURNED!
 
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wandwizard

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I believe TMF revive would work well on this. Being mindful to not over wet and dry quickly with fans.
More than likely it would. I believe a lot of pros will use an upholstery shampoo for fine fabrics on something like that and in many cases will opt for a Haitian Cotton Shampoo because it inhibits browning and it can in some cases correct browning. I like to use Matrix Radiant and do an acid rinse. The first step is to avoid overwetting to start with. I like to use an electric sprayer to apply my upholstery presrpays with an 02 jet or I'll use a sea sponge. Using the Hydroforce on some fabrics is going to get them WAY TOO WET especially if it's cotton or linen! A good pump up can also be effective. I normally follow either method with an acid rinse. I haven't ever had an issue doing it that way. With using a shampoo some prefer to towel off the fabric and either do just dry, vacuum only. extraction or just towel extraction. It's helpful to know that when dealing with particularly delicate or difficult pieces to clean. I wish I could go back in time and tell myself this believe me, but I don't have a DeLorean with time travel capabilities. :) It's good to at least know several methods so you can apply them to what you're doing.
 
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TillertheJohn

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More than likely it would. I believe a lot of pros will use an upholstery shampoo for fine fabrics on something like that and in many cases will opt for a Haitian Cotton Shampoo because it inhibits browning and it can in some cases correct browning. I like to use Matrix Radiant and do an acid rinse. The first step is to avoid overwetting to start with. I like to use an electric sprayer to apply my upholstery presrpays with an 02 jet or I'll use a sea sponge. Using the Hydroforce on some fabrics is going to get them WAY TOO WET especially if it's cotton or linen! A good pump up can also be effective. I normally follow either method with an acid rinse. I haven't ever had an issue doing it that way. With using a shampoo some prefer to towel off the fabric and either do just dry, vacuum only. extraction or just towel extraction. It's helpful to know that when dealing with particularly delicate or difficult pieces to clean. I wish I could go back in time and tell myself this believe me, but I don't have a DeLorean with time travel capabilities. :) It's good to at least know several methods so you can apply them to what you're doing.
Good stuff, thank you.

After I clean the cotton sectional tomorrow by spraying Revive (ph 6-7) using my pump up evenly and conservatively I will be using the acid rinse (ph 4-5) while extracting with my low moisture Upholstery tool.

I think I will use cotton towels to 'towel it off' further after extracting as the fans are blowing over it.

Hopefully goes well.

Keep thinking of Rob's video about Revive where he starts off saying basically cleaners no longer have to worry about delicates anymore with Revive. LOL
 
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Jim Davisson

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If you see a change of color it can be because of the cleaning agent that you are using or because of what has already been used on the fabric because residue left behind. My guess is on the above furniture the customer has been using some kind of cleaner or spotter that is alkaline so it may actually remove the spot and make it look better temporarily at least. When it dries out in an alkaline state it will begin to brown. That is true fabric browning. Cotton and other naturals need to either be cleaned on the acid side or a self-neutralizing treatment can be used effectively in a lot of cases. If I think there is even a remote chance of bleeding I always clean and rinse with an acid side cleaner and get it as dry as possible. I will towel the piece off a lot of times because cotton especially tends to absorb and hold onto moisture. The above fabric is super likely to brown so that would be my major concern with it. Yesterday I cleaned a couch that was black on white design. I knew for certain that the chances of that black bleeding into the white was VERY, VERY HIGH! I wasn't really concerned about browning, but I was super concerned about bleeding on that one!

As for yellowing, I suspect also a spotter that has some type of hydrogen peroxide could well have caused it. I suppose some other things might cause it, but peroxide would be my closest guess. I don't use H2O2 on any natural if I can help it and only then with extreme caution. A lot of our customers buy stain removers with "oxi" on the label and really have no idea why they shouldn't put it on that wool rug or that expensive cotton sectional. They also don't understand what harm over the counter stain removers can do to these fabrics just by being alkaline ph. Btw, a whole lot of otherwise good cleaning professionals don't either. A lot of us have had to learn the hard way and I'm including myself in that lineup. I remember vividly cleaning a multi-colored couch with a flower design in it years ago. Before I left the house it started to bleed like a slaughtered hog! I was very lucky I was able to correct it. I also used Matrix Finish First one time to attempt to clean a Haitian cotton chair back in the 90's. I had never even heard of Haitian cotton. That sucker turned dark brown on contact with the Finish First detergent with about a ph of 10! Again, I was fortunate enough that I at least did understand what was happening and I was able to correct it.

All that to say this again, Don't make it a habit to use chems made for carpet on upholstery unless you are 100% certain they are safe for what you're working on. Either you may wind up paying for it or your GL insurance is about to go UP! I bet you a dollar that a lot of cleaners have wound up purchasing furniture and rugs they've cleaned, but are ashamed to admit it. Be safe and learn all you can about it. Be especially careful with stain removers on naturals of any kind including naturals blended with synthetics. You simply can't get too crazy with naturals and a lot of vibrant colors and not get BURNED!
More than likely it would. I believe a lot of pros will use an upholstery shampoo for fine fabrics on something like that and in many cases will opt for a Haitian Cotton Shampoo because it inhibits browning and it can in some cases correct browning. I like to use Matrix Radiant and do an acid rinse. The first step is to avoid overwetting to start with. I like to use an electric sprayer to apply my upholstery presrpays with an 02 jet or I'll use a sea sponge. Using the Hydroforce on some fabrics is going to get them WAY TOO WET especially if it's cotton or linen! A good pump up can also be effective. I normally follow either method with an acid rinse. I haven't ever had an issue doing it that way. With using a shampoo some prefer to towel off the fabric and either do just dry, vacuum only. extraction or just towel extraction. It's helpful to know that when dealing with particularly delicate or difficult pieces to clean. I wish I could go back in time and tell myself this believe me, but I don't have a DeLorean with time travel capabilities. :) It's good to at least know several methods so you can apply them to what you're doing.

There is a pile of experience speaking above. Speed and upholstery cleaning is hard won. It takes knowledge of the fibers, knowing the chemistry and namely the pH it can handle that is best along with application methods that accomplish results with out poking a giant hole in your day. Unfortunately there isn't a well mapped out path. What I see as gravy money at $20-30/ft takes others the better part of an afternoon. Why you ask? Because I don't see 1/8" fabric like carpet... it doesn't require a deep flush to clean tshirt thickness material. Practice, practice, practice. Amateurs practice until they get it right, professionals practice until they can't get it wrong. Yuge difference.
 

Jim Davisson

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Cotton upholstery becomes translucent when wet, ever been to a wet tshirt contest? Preinspection will show you what will show through during cleaning. Is there pure yellow cushion under the fabric? Poly batting glued over the cushion? Monks cloth zippered over poly batting? All will show a different color through the fabric when wet.

Reupholstering carries a separate warning to homeowners... we are not responsible for reverse panel markings made in marker in the reupholstering process are not our responsibility. I fully reccomend disassembling a cushion for an idea of what to expect, you can't do the same on a frame. Call out that shit beforehand. When the backwards #5 shows through on the kick plate don't own it jus sayin
 

TillertheJohn

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Cotton upholstery becomes translucent when wet, ever been to a wet tshirt contest? Preinspection will show you what will show through during cleaning. Is there pure yellow cushion under the fabric? Poly batting glued over the cushion? Monks cloth zippered over poly batting? All will show a different color through the fabric when wet.

Reupholstering carries a separate warning to homeowners... we are not responsible for reverse panel markings made in marker in the reupholstering process are not our responsibility. I fully reccomend disassembling a cushion for an idea of what to expect, you can't do the same on a frame. Call out that shit beforehand. When the backwards #5 shows through on the kick plate don't own it jus sayin
Word.

it’s supposedly cotton twill FWIW.

And will keep in mind all said above!
 

wandwizard

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Good stuff, thank you.

After I clean the cotton sectional tomorrow by spraying Revive (ph 6-7) using my pump up evenly and conservatively I will be using the acid rinse (ph 4-5) while extracting with my low moisture Upholstery tool.

I think I will use cotton towels to 'towel it off' further after extracting as the fans are blowing over it.

Hopefully goes well.

Keep thinking of Rob's video about Revive where he starts off saying basically cleaners no longer have to worry about delicates anymore with Revive. LOL
Well, if you use proper procedures, use a good tool, and the right chems you pretty much don't have to worry. Most of the problems with upholstery will be from using the wrong cleaners on it, getting over-aggressive with a brush or perhaps an old-style tool. Other than that bleeding or browning is almost a thing of the past with the chemistry that's available. Bleeding usually occurs as the fabric is drying. Leaving it extremely wet is almost with certainty going to cause a problem on some naturals. It is primarily the folds, creases, and button areas that can be a problem. Water will always migrate to the path of least resistance which on upholstery is normally going to be down. So I pay special attention to those areas and use fans if needed. If you don't you may wind up with some water stains or worse. A good tool is definitely helpful when doing upholstery. I know because I worked with a crappy tool for quite a few years!
 
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