when to replace pressure hoses

Jim Davisson

Well-Known Member
Aug 23, 2016
4,387
5,322
113
Serving the greater Charlotte area
Real Name
James Davisson
Business Location
United States
Portable hoses can go 10 years if cared for. TM hose is a whole different story. I've had 150' continuous Parker hose last 15 years, but coily as hell. Neptune we buy bulk in 500' spools and swage our own hydraulic fittings on. On average 1.5 years on a live reel and we flip them (put the wand end on the bottom of the reel and usually get another year and a half).

You will get to a point where you will see a slight bend in the hose when laid out straight under use, this is where it's going to blow out more often times than not. Typically, it was bent over hard reeling up hot. Mark them with a sharpie for fun and watch them, if you see it will give up the ghost outside the structure one day.

Carry field repair couplings in your tool box. You can cut out the bad section with aviation snips, strip a 1/4" of the sheath off and thread on the field repair coupling and insert and be back in business in 5 minutes flat. Good luck out there!
 

Jim Davisson

Well-Known Member
Aug 23, 2016
4,387
5,322
113
Serving the greater Charlotte area
Real Name
James Davisson
Business Location
United States
A magic eraser in a Ziploc bag in your truck is a life saver for black death bursts. Whenever possible I disconnected the solution line and jam it down the vacuum hose to mitigate things before moving outside and spreading the joy. It seems 3-4 of these chaotic events are a rite of passage lol
 

mrotto

Well-Known Member
Sep 1, 2009
3,086
2,093
113
Wisconsin
Real Name
Paul Ottensmann
Business Location
United States
i like to be proactive in maintenance. In other words, I dont wait to have things break. So as far as hoses, I replace them every year and sell the used one for 50% of what I pay for the new one either on craigslist or ebay. theres always a carpet cleaner looking for a good deal.
 

Fedri

Well-Known Member
Jan 25, 2015
4,474
2,350
113
Mississauga Canada
Real Name
Fedri Irsat
Portable hoses can go 10 years if cared for. TM hose is a whole different story. I've had 150' continuous Parker hose last 15 years, but coily as hell. Neptune we buy bulk in 500' spools and swage our own hydraulic fittings on. On average 1.5 years on a live reel and we flip them (put the wand end on the bottom of the reel and usually get another year and a half).

You will get to a point where you will see a slight bend in the hose when laid out straight under use, this is where it's going to blow out more often times than not. Typically, it was bent over hard reeling up hot. Mark them with a sharpie for fun and watch them, if you see it will give up the ghost outside the structure one day.

Carry field repair couplings in your tool box. You can cut out the bad section with aviation snips, strip a 1/4" of the sheath off and thread on the field repair coupling and insert and be back in business in 5 minutes flat. Good luck out there!
I don't know if it helps or not but I always turn off my heater 5 min before finishing the wanding so things can cool down on every job.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jim Davisson

The Cleaning Artist

Active Member
Jun 20, 2008
289
141
43
Fl
We replace about every 9 months. Some hoses we have tried only lasted 3 to 4 months b4 they blew out.
 

Jim Davisson

Well-Known Member
Aug 23, 2016
4,387
5,322
113
Serving the greater Charlotte area
Real Name
James Davisson
Business Location
United States
I don't know if it helps or not but I always turn off my heater 5 min before finishing the wanding so things can cool down on every job.

It's always been said it's best to cool down any heat exchangers before shut down.

With air cooled TM's it's best to dump heat in the heat exchanger while still at half throttle or better and then straight shut it off. A really hot air cooled engine lacks cooling capacity at an idle and trying to cool one down that just ran like a scalded dog at an idle like that is a false economy and I believe shortens it's lifespan.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Fedri

Mike Jones

New Member
Jun 8, 2011
26
4
3
Thanks for all the response. So, so far, the consensus ;) to how do you decide when to replace your (TM) pressure hose, is:
3-4 months
9 months
annually
1-2 years
When virgo passes through gemini.

So mostly we are all just guessing, and hoping we don't have a blow out. Someone suggested `a magic eraser in a Ziploc bag in your truck' is helpful. Is that anything like carrying a rabbits foot in your pocket? I'm not clear on how providing transportation to a magic eraser contributes to the decision making process.

Someone said `look for a slight bend in the hose when laid out straight under use'. The blow out we had yesterday didn't present it self like that. Have others noticed that a slight bend in a hose laid out straight is an indicator?

All kidding aside, it does seem like this is a difficult problem to solve, short of frequently (whatever that means) replacing hoses. Putting ones hoses on a schedule also has it's issues. Do you just remember which hose was replaced, and when, or do you tag your hoses with a date somehow? And wouldn't basing the swapping or replacing of ones hoses be better based on hours of machine use rather than on the calendar?
 

[email protected]

Active Member
Sep 19, 2010
180
135
43
Yorba Linda
www.mjmcarpetcleaning.com
Real Name
mike mitts
Business Location
United States
Heres what I found. The hotter you run and more preasure the less life of hose. We run on one mount. 800 to 1000 psi 280 to 290 temp going into a 10 flow for tools...wand ....drag bar...foor tool etc. Yes that is extreme. (I don't like making a career out of a job.) This truck was getting hoses rotated once a week and fully replaced once every 4 months. I started running soft water and hoses are good still after 9 months but I replace them anyways out of fear of bad things happening. The other truck we never go above 700 psi and I think it gets 230 degrees..it has a 4 ht. Those hoses last a year. I will get a Soft water system in that van. Soft water is great...and way less chems.
 

Todd the Cleaner

Todd Cottino
Premium VIP
Sep 4, 2011
22,952
15,116
113
50
Pahrump, Nevada, United States
www.toddscleaningservice.com
Real Name
Todd Cottino
Business Location
United States
I buy a new 100 foot lead hose every year and then I take the old 100 footer and have it cut into two 50’s. I rotate them through the hose reel so that the oldest is the last hose I’d use. As I rotate the hoses through I toss the oldest ones each year. By the time I toss the hose it’s been on my hose reel for 3 years.
 

Fedri

Well-Known Member
Jan 25, 2015
4,474
2,350
113
Mississauga Canada
Real Name
Fedri Irsat
Thanks for all the response. So, so far, the consensus ;) to how do you decide when to replace your (TM) pressure hose, is:
3-4 months
9 months
annually
1-2 years
When virgo passes through gemini.

So mostly we are all just guessing, and hoping we don't have a blow out. Someone suggested `a magic eraser in a Ziploc bag in your truck' is helpful. Is that anything like carrying a rabbits foot in your pocket? I'm not clear on how providing transportation to a magic eraser contributes to the decision making process.

Someone said `look for a slight bend in the hose when laid out straight under use'. The blow out we had yesterday didn't present it self like that. Have others noticed that a slight bend in a hose laid out straight is an indicator?

All kidding aside, it does seem like this is a difficult problem to solve, short of frequently (whatever that means) replacing hoses. Putting ones hoses on a schedule also has it's issues. Do you just remember which hose was replaced, and when, or do you tag your hoses with a date somehow? And wouldn't basing the swapping or replacing of ones hoses be better based on hours of machine use rather than on the calendar?
It all depends how you use them, I said for me I need to change them every 2 years because I don't go more then 600 psi and about 180 degrees that i hit at my wand, I always cool my hose after every job. I never had my hose to burst in a short period of time but can it happen? Sure it can, just like brand new tires can also go flat.
 

Jim Davisson

Well-Known Member
Aug 23, 2016
4,387
5,322
113
Serving the greater Charlotte area
Real Name
James Davisson
Business Location
United States
All kidding aside, it does seem like this is a difficult problem to solve, short of frequently (whatever that means) replacing hoses. Putting ones hoses on a schedule also has it's issues. Do you just remember which hose was replaced, and when, or do you tag your hoses with a date somehow? And wouldn't basing the swapping or replacing of ones hoses be better based on hours of machine use rather than on the calendar?
Was your original post a rhetorical question? I'm confused now.
 

Anderson

Well-Known Member
Aug 16, 2006
2,978
1,246
113
62
Belton Texas
Real Name
MARCUS ANDERSON
Business Location
United States
Portable hoses can go 10 years if cared for. TM hose is a whole different story. I've had 150' continuous Parker hose last 15 years, but coily as hell. Neptune we buy bulk in 500' spools and swage our own hydraulic fittings on. On average 1.5 years on a live reel and we flip them (put the wand end on the bottom of the reel and usually get another year and a half).

You will get to a point where you will see a slight bend in the hose when laid out straight under use, this is where it's going to blow out more often times than not. Typically, it was bent over hard reeling up hot. Mark them with a sharpie for fun and watch them, if you see it will give up the ghost outside the structure one day.

Carry field repair couplings in your tool box. You can cut out the bad section with aviation snips, strip a 1/4" of the sheath off and thread on the field repair coupling and insert and be back in business in 5 minutes flat. Good luck out there!
so parker hose wont burst or at least wont give black death????