What's your best carpet cleaning "tip & trick"?

rob allen

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Here's one I like to do, keeps you cool while cleaning stairs. I'll share more later. What's your best tip & trick?

 

rob allen

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OxiFreshGuy

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Hmm....mine is you know how sometimes you accidentally turn on your pressure valve with nothing connected and now you have to go out to the machine and shut it down?

Well you don't actually, (this only works for 600 PSI or less), if you hold the trigger on your wand while connecting (or use a velcro strap to make it easier), it will still connect, allowing you to release the pressure without going back out to the truck.

@Jim Davisson Jim Davisson has an EXCELLENT trick regarding male QD's with spurs on them.
 

U. S. Vet.

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Hmm....mine is you know how sometimes you accidentally turn on your pressure valve with nothing connected and now you have to go out to the machine and shut it down?

Well you don't actually, (this only works for 600 PSI or less), if you hold the trigger on your wand while connecting (or use a velcro strap to make it easier), it will still connect, allowing you to release the pressure without going back out to the truck.

@Jim Davisson Jim Davisson has an EXCELLENT trick regarding male QD's with spurs on them.
Yes, until it’s the in-line sprayer • then you have to wiggle one foot inside the guard on the ( open trigger ), wand handle to release • • • it blows <—— p. i.

I know • release valve
 

wandwizard

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This is for removing tiny, permanent stains such as drips or anything that absolutely CANNOT be removed otherwise and it's ONLY for cut pile carpets so don't say I didn't warn you. I keep a multi-purpose tool in my pocket that has needle nose pliers on it. Simply pull a few of the affected fibers. Don't get over aggressive with it or you'll be doing a patch instead of a fiber pull! I've used this on adhesive drips that didn't respond at all to solvents, for small burns such as dropped ashes from a cigarette, and smaller permanent stains. I take the position if it's going to help make it look better do it. Otherwise leave it alone. I've probably removed thousands of small spots or burns like this over the years. If done properly you will not be able to tell it when you're done or at least there will be a significant improvement. If it's so big it needs a patch obviously this isn't the way to go. Don't like my tip? Don't use it. I will continue using it until I hang up my wand for the last time. All I can say is by doing this I take out stuff that otherwise will be a serious eye sore and I can't stand eye sores after I've tried my best to get the carpet cleaned!

Fyi, just a couple weeks ago I cleaned 2 apartments for the largest apartment complex in my town. One had a number of smaller cigarette ash burns scattered over the entire living room. The other had a number of some type of very small, blackish, adhesive spots that didn't respond to two of my solvents whatsoever. Both had very light colored carpet with one almost white so these stood out like a sore thumb. I used this on both apartments and I think the improvement of appearance was significant with very little investment of time on my part. If burns or permanent stains are more on the tips of fibers scissors or shears are the better choice. Lastly, yes I did charge a little extra for doing this. Charge what you think it's worth. This was a LOT more than a few spots on both places. The property managers and landlords I work for appreciate the extra attention to detail as do my regular customers.
 
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rob allen

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This is for removing tiny, permanent stains such as drips or anything that absolutely CANNOT be removed otherwise and it's ONLY for cut pile carpets so don't say I didn't warn you. I keep a multi-purpose tool in my pocket that has needle nose pliers on it. Simply pull a few of the affected fibers. Don't get over aggressive with it or you'll be doing a patch instead of a fiber pull! I've used this on adhesive drips that didn't respond at all to solvents, for small burns such as dropped ashes from a cigarette, and smaller permanent stains. I take the position if it's going to help make it look better do it. Otherwise leave it alone. I've probably removed thousands of small spots or burns like this over the years. If done properly you will not be able to tell it when you're done or at least there will be a significant improvement. If it's so big it needs a patch obviously this isn't the way to go. Don't like my tip? Don't use it. I will continue using it until I hang up my wand for the last time. All I can say is by doing this I take out stuff that otherwise will be a serious eye sore and I can't stand eye sores after I've tried my best to get the carpet cleaned!

Fyi, just a couple weeks ago I cleaned 2 apartments for the largest apartment complex in my town. One had a number of smaller cigarette ash burns scattered over the entire living room. The other had a number of some type of very small, blackish, adhesive spots that didn't respond to two of my solvents whatsoever. Both had very light colored carpet with one almost white so these stood out like a sore thumb. I used this on both apartments and I think the improvement of appearance was significant with very little investment of time on my part. If burns or permanent stains are more on the tips of fibers scissors or shears are the better choice. Lastly, yes I did charge a little extra for doing this. Charge what you think it's worth. This was a LOT more than a few spots on both places. The property managers and landlords I work for appreciate the extra attention to detail as do my regular customers.

I’ve heard sandpaper block works on cigarette burns.
 

Timothyscarpet

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This is for removing tiny, permanent stains such as drips or anything that absolutely CANNOT be removed otherwise and it's ONLY for cut pile carpets so don't say I didn't warn you. I keep a multi-purpose tool in my pocket that has needle nose pliers on it. Simply pull a few of the affected fibers. Don't get over aggressive with it or you'll be doing a patch instead of a fiber pull! I've used this on adhesive drips that didn't respond at all to solvents, for small burns such as dropped ashes from a cigarette, and smaller permanent stains. I take the position if it's going to help make it look better do it. Otherwise leave it alone. I've probably removed thousands of small spots or burns like this over the years. If done properly you will not be able to tell it when you're done or at least there will be a significant improvement. If it's so big it needs a patch obviously this isn't the way to go. Don't like my tip? Don't use it. I will continue using it until I hang up my wand for the last time. All I can say is by doing this I take out stuff that otherwise will be a serious eye sore and I can't stand eye sores after I've tried my best to get the carpet cleaned!

Fyi, just a couple weeks ago I cleaned 2 apartments for the largest apartment complex in my town. One had a number of smaller cigarette ash burns scattered over the entire living room. The other had a number of some type of very small, blackish, adhesive spots that didn't respond to two of my solvents whatsoever. Both had very light colored carpet with one almost white so these stood out like a sore thumb. I used this on both apartments and I think the improvement of appearance was significant with very little investment of time on my part. If burns or permanent stains are more on the tips of fibers scissors or shears are the better choice. Lastly, yes I did charge a little extra for doing this. Charge what you think it's worth. This was a LOT more than a few spots on both places. The property managers and landlords I work for appreciate the extra attention to detail as do my regular customers.
I got no problem giving a cut pile a little trim job with my duck bill shears.....like you said if it will look better do it.
 
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ACP

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Here's a big one that many don't know surprisingly..... don't be the "we don't move furniture" company

Instead, offer a higher $ service and simply dry pass underneath.

If there is soiling or a stain then of course deal with it but 99% of the time u just dry stroke and you don't need to tab / block.

I remember years back when we would literally move the furniture, vacuum, pre spray, rinse, then block it.. that's an insane amount of work.

In a lot of cases for living rooms you can just have one guy tip the couch back and then other dry passes under it.
 

RollingHills

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this rather a prevention than a cleaning tip trick.


Keep Your Rug Away from Direct Sunlight

The sun is not a friend to your handmade rug. Direct sunlight can potentially cause enormous amounts of damage, especially to the colors. Before you decide where to position your rug, be sure you know how much sun it will get, and keep in mind changes caused by the season and time of day. Avoid positioning your rug anywhere that will see more than minimal direct sunlight. Using blinds or curtains can do wonders to help protect your rug, especially if you keep them drawn anytime the room is not in use. If you are looking to protect a particularly valuable rug it is well worth investing in UV protective coatings for your windows and skylights.
 

Dream Clean

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Emerson Campbell
Hmm....mine is you know how sometimes you accidentally turn on your pressure valve with nothing connected and now you have to go out to the machine and shut it down?

Well you don't actually, (this only works for 600 PSI or less), if you hold the trigger on your wand while connecting (or use a velcro strap to make it easier), it will still connect, allowing you to release the pressure without going back out to the truck.

@Jim Davisson Jim Davisson has an EXCELLENT trick regarding male QD's with spurs on them.
This is the biggest reason I will never run a female QD at the end of my like. I can't be trusted to not turn on the valve at least once a day. Do I pay an extra $10 a year because I smack the end on so many things to relieve pressure? Yup. Is it cheaper than 100 walks to the van and back? Probably.