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What chemicals will disinfect for Corona virus?

Mama Fen

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Truth is, this whole thing also shows how all of our medical advancement won't save you if you become infected.

The treatment is essentially fluids and medications and hope you don't die.

The virus is spreading worldwide too fast for a vaccine or anti-viral medicine to be formulated.

Really it's probably our good sanitation systems that is keeping it from infecting millions. Only thousands we know of have been infected at this point.
My degrees at NCSU were Microbiology and English. Two things that don't seem to have much in common at first glance... until you realize that both of them are the study of things that seem to exist for the sole purpose of breaking the rules.

Viruses in particular are incredible, glorious, terrifyingly efficient constructs. Science still can't quite determine whether or not to classify them as living things, because they lack several of the qualities that we use to determine whether or not something classifies as a "living thing" or a "life form".

Viruses do not need to metabolise; they require no energy and produce no ATP. They have no "birth", "death", or "growth" stages. They are far more similar to seeds (which are inert until they land in an environment conducive to growth) than they are to any living thing.

And yet, the instant a virus touches a cell, it explodes into being.

Complex interactions begin at lightning speed, and suddenly this inert, seemingly dead mechanism roars into action and turns the cell into a reproductive factory. The viral DNA (or RNA) unfolds like an unzipped zipper, and begins re-writing the genes of the host cell.

And in the process, some of the copies are imperfect - a sequence gets dropped, or exchanged for another sequence out of order - and the viruses mutates... which is a phenomenon that we ONLY see in life forms.

If one looks at the most current maps of the COVID-19 outbreak, one sees a pattern quickly emerging that is breathtaking in its efficiency.

This microscopic organism with no motility (no means of propelling itself; no feet, no wings, not even a flagellum), which is so simple in comparison to us that it has only 30,000 base pairs in its entire gene sequence (humans have over 3 BILLION), is swiftly using our bodies to establish itself in every major port area around the globe.

It has a foothold on the shores of every continent that carries a stable human population. And it didn't need to lift a finger (which it doesn't have anyway) to do so.

I cannot help but be fascinated by these things. I admire them, I respect them, but I am not afraid of them. They are designed flawlessly, they do what Nature has created them to do with ruthless efficiency, and they have no emotions to get in the way of their function. We think of them as a destructive force, but the more we discover about them the more we realize that our relationship with them is symbiotic... in other words, we could not survive without them.

There's frankly a LOT we could learn from them.

Yes, this virus will impact our elderly, our young, and our ill more than it will the healthy and the strong.

As human beings, we are unique in our insistence in caring for those who cannot care for themselves. What we call "natural selection" in animals, we refuse to accept for ourselves because we see ourselves as 'more evolved than that'.

As a result, we have set up hospitals and assisted living facilities - artificial environments FULL of the sick, the wounded, and the compromised - in the hopes of healing those who would otherwise die... and in the process, we have given this virus an ideal playground upon which to unleash its machinery.
 

keep it clean

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My degrees at NCSU were Microbiology and English. Two things that don't seem to have much in common at first glance... until you realize that both of them are the study of things that seem to exist for the sole purpose of breaking the rules.

Viruses in particular are incredible, glorious, terrifyingly efficient constructs. Science still can't quite determine whether or not to classify them as living things, because they lack several of the qualities that we use to determine whether or not something classifies as a "living thing" or a "life form".

Viruses do not need to metabolise; they require no energy and produce no ATP. They have no "birth", "death", or "growth" stages. They are far more similar to seeds (which are inert until they land in an environment conducive to growth) than they are to any living thing.

And yet, the instant a virus touches a cell, it explodes into being.

Complex interactions begin at lightning speed, and suddenly this inert, seemingly dead mechanism roars into action and turns the cell into a reproductive factory. The viral DNA (or RNA) unfolds like an unzipped zipper, and begins re-writing the genes of the host cell.

And in the process, some of the copies are imperfect - a sequence gets dropped, or exchanged for another sequence out of order - and the viruses mutates... which is a phenomenon that we ONLY see in life forms.

If one looks at the most current maps of the COVID-19 outbreak, one sees a pattern quickly emerging that is breathtaking in its efficiency.

This microscopic organism with no motility (no means of propelling itself; no feet, no wings, not even a flagellum), which is so simple in comparison to us that it has only 30,000 base pairs in its entire gene sequence (humans have over 3 BILLION), is swiftly using our bodies to establish itself in every major port area around the globe.

It has a foothold on the shores of every continent that carries a stable human population. And it didn't need to lift a finger (which it doesn't have anyway) to do so.

I cannot help but be fascinated by these things. I admire them, I respect them, but I am not afraid of them. They are designed flawlessly, they do what Nature has created them to do with ruthless efficiency, and they have no emotions to get in the way of their function. We think of them as a destructive force, but the more we discover about them the more we realize that our relationship with them is symbiotic... in other words, we could not survive without them.

There's frankly a LOT we could learn from them.

Yes, this virus will impact our elderly, our young, and our ill more than it will the healthy and the strong.

As human beings, we are unique in our insistence in caring for those who cannot care for themselves. What we call "natural selection" in animals, we refuse to accept for ourselves because we see ourselves as 'more evolved than that'.

As a result, we have set up hospitals and assisted living facilities - artificial environments FULL of the sick, the wounded, and the compromised - in the hopes of healing those who would otherwise die... and in the process, we have given this virus an ideal playground upon which to unleash its machinery.
Do you have a secret lab under your house? Idk i picture you coming home from jani sales then going into some high tech lab after hours doing biology stuff and stuff. Amy's la•bora•tory
 
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Mama Fen

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Do you have a secret lab under your house? Idk i picture you coming home from jani sales then going into some high tech lab after hours doing biology stuff and stuff. Amy's la•bora•tory
I wish. Oh, how I wish.
 

keep it clean

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Lol school just called and they're closed tomorrow. Because a couple kids got sick. Good thing theres no snow flurries or drizzle. The whole state could go into shut down
 

Sanipro

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I’ve been using Hdq neutral from spartan. Pretty strong for only one ounce per gallon. Spray everywhere and let it sit for ten minutes.
IMG_0105.JPG
 
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Spazznout

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My degrees at NCSU were Microbiology and English. Two things that don't seem to have much in common at first glance... until you realize that both of them are the study of things that seem to exist for the sole purpose of breaking the rules.

Viruses in particular are incredible, glorious, terrifyingly efficient constructs. Science still can't quite determine whether or not to classify them as living things, because they lack several of the qualities that we use to determine whether or not something classifies as a "living thing" or a "life form".

Viruses do not need to metabolise; they require no energy and produce no ATP. They have no "birth", "death", or "growth" stages. They are far more similar to seeds (which are inert until they land in an environment conducive to growth) than they are to any living thing.

And yet, the instant a virus touches a cell, it explodes into being.

Complex interactions begin at lightning speed, and suddenly this inert, seemingly dead mechanism roars into action and turns the cell into a reproductive factory. The viral DNA (or RNA) unfolds like an unzipped zipper, and begins re-writing the genes of the host cell.

And in the process, some of the copies are imperfect - a sequence gets dropped, or exchanged for another sequence out of order - and the viruses mutates... which is a phenomenon that we ONLY see in life forms.

If one looks at the most current maps of the COVID-19 outbreak, one sees a pattern quickly emerging that is breathtaking in its efficiency.

This microscopic organism with no motility (no means of propelling itself; no feet, no wings, not even a flagellum), which is so simple in comparison to us that it has only 30,000 base pairs in its entire gene sequence (humans have over 3 BILLION), is swiftly using our bodies to establish itself in every major port area around the globe.

It has a foothold on the shores of every continent that carries a stable human population. And it didn't need to lift a finger (which it doesn't have anyway) to do so.

I cannot help but be fascinated by these things. I admire them, I respect them, but I am not afraid of them. They are designed flawlessly, they do what Nature has created them to do with ruthless efficiency, and they have no emotions to get in the way of their function. We think of them as a destructive force, but the more we discover about them the more we realize that our relationship with them is symbiotic... in other words, we could not survive without them.

There's frankly a LOT we could learn from them.

Yes, this virus will impact our elderly, our young, and our ill more than it will the healthy and the strong.

As human beings, we are unique in our insistence in caring for those who cannot care for themselves. What we call "natural selection" in animals, we refuse to accept for ourselves because we see ourselves as 'more evolved than that'.

As a result, we have set up hospitals and assisted living facilities - artificial environments FULL of the sick, the wounded, and the compromised - in the hopes of healing those who would otherwise die... and in the process, we have given this virus an ideal playground upon which to unleash its machinery.
Agree in the efficiency..............already it seems one major mutation has occurred with the less fatal taking the lead as it is also more virulent. This would make sense as killing the host is never good for a virus' longevity.

Another point. The young. A report from the CDC and WHO came out today. Its from work done in S Korea and Italy. The young under 10 while they do catch the virus, they are less affected by this than the strains of flu running this year. Often showing no symptoms and needing to see a Dr in less than 2-3% of cases. Good and bad that this makes them supercarriers of sorts as they also do not show symptoms.

As for folks over 60, overweight, compromised health issues, diabetes, asthma etc..........this thing is real and is killing at a very high rate for these folks........near or above 10%.
 

Mama Fen

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Some rich asshole in St. Louis decided to attend his daughters school after his other daughter was confirmed with Corona. In my opinion should be criminally charged.
The profiteers need to be charged as well. The next time I see someone making ridiculous claims or charging ridiculous prices, I'm probably gonna give them a dose of Mama.
 

OneBlueSummer

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Epa released a list a couple days ago of what to use.
The cliff notes are this, bleach, peroxide, and quats will work.

Saponification still the best followed by killers.
If you guys are going to do any of this don't say disinfect as that means 100% removal, say sanitize as thats means 99.9% removal, so if grandpa Willie croaks you can say, ahhhhhh must have been that .1 percent that got him.

I think ima contact some schools and go sanitize the playgrounds for free.
 

Joe cool

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A bird flys by and poops in your backyard and your get together peeps get it .
 

Mama Fen

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Epa released a list a couple days ago of what to use.
The cliff notes are this, bleach, peroxide, and quats will work.

Saponification still the best followed by killers.
If you guys are going to do any of this don't say disinfect as that means 100% removal, say sanitize as thats means 99.9% removal, so if grandpa Willie croaks you can say, ahhhhhh must have been that .1 percent that got him.

I think ima contact some schools and go sanitize the playgrounds for free.
Chlorine bleach, quats, phenolics, and thymol SHOULD work, according to EPA and CDC, based on what they currently claim to kill.

Keep in mind also that the majority of chemicals listed on their List N publication are by Clorox, Purell, and Lysol and are available at any store (in other words, products designed for homeowner use and not professionals).
 
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Scott W

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major issues I see with folks using disinfectants - either for themselves or for customers - is dwell time. One product mentioned above requires 10 minutes dwell time. The surface needs to be wet for 10 minutes. That is pretty significant soaking. Spray and leave will probably give a 3 log reduction (99.9%) while spraying, dwell time and wipe off can give 5 log reduction or greater (99.999%) While tenths, hundreds and thousandths of a percent may seem insignificant, they really matter when we are talking millions of bacteria on a surface.

hen it should be wiped off with microfiber or at least synthetic fiber cloth. Disinfectant should not be applied with natural fibers which can interfere with the action of chlorine and other oxidizers as well as quats and thymol.
 
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