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Urine and wool oriental rug

Scott W

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The Rig Sucker is a tool for flushing contamination out of a carpet and for helping to dry a carpet quicker. It can be assembled in different lengths from 3' on up. The photo is a 3' version of the Rug Sucker. It gets rugs almost as dry as a centrifuge for a lot less money.

https://interlinksupply.com/index.php?item_num=1671-4382
 

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fashion79

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At this moment I have soaked the carpet with acid water. How long do I leave him soaked?
After the soaking, what am I going to do?
Thanks!!!

 

rob allen

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At this moment I have soaked the carpet with acid water. How long do I leave him soaked?
After the soaking, what am I going to do?
Thanks!!!

Long enough break up urine salts, 4-8 hours.
 
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rob allen

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Not 24 hours?
Depends on severity and weather the rug can take a soak of that length. It appears they one you are soaking can go 24 hours, but a tufted rug for example cannot as the backing will separate.
 
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fashion79

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Depends on severity and weather the rug can take a soak of that length. It appears they one you are soaking can go 24 hours, but a tufted rug for example cannot as the backing will separate.
Thank you dear
 
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You can handle the odor with just acetic and an immersion wash. Clean with a wool safe oriental rug shampoo and lots of rinsing and speed dry
 

Scott W

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Thanks!!!!!
There is a ratio of water and acetic acid?
Acetic acid has been used for many decades in rug bathes. I think there are better ways that work faster, work more completely and don't have the odor. But many like an acetic acid bath because it has a proven record.

Acetic acid can be purchased in many strengths. Usually as a rug bath for urine it is used around 3 to 5%. It can be used at a lower concentration but will take a little longer.
 

PATRICK YANELLO

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Acetic acid has been used for many decades in rug bathes. I think there are better ways that work faster, work more completely and don't have the odor. But many like an acetic acid bath because it has a proven record.

Acetic acid can be purchased in many strengths. Usually as a rug bath for urine it is used around 3 to 5%. It can be used at a lower concentration but will take a little longer.
Any link to an Acetic Acid product for this?
 

Scott W

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Any link to an Acetic Acid product for this?
#1 product for urine and contamination from organic sources, acid-side but also surfactants and more - https://interlinksupply.com/index.php?item_num=CW17GL

Acetic acid can be purchased diluted with water and no added ingredients. 96 or 97% pure is called glacial acetic acid because it is a thick gel. Economical way to purchase if you buy a lot, but very dangerous as acid that strong can do a lot of damage. This would come from a chemical supply house.

When cut down to between 4% and 6% acid and the remainder distilled water, it is sold in grocery stores. White vinegar. Red wine vinegar has the same chemical properties but tends to stain rugs. Still I have known at least two cleaners try to save money by using red wine vinegar they had in their home rather than buying a product made for rugs. :eek:
 

PATRICK YANELLO

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#1 product for urine and contamination from organic sources, acid-side but also surfactants and more - https://interlinksupply.com/index.php?item_num=CW17GL

Acetic acid can be purchased diluted with water and no added ingredients. 96 or 97% pure is called glacial acetic acid because it is a thick gel. Economical way to purchase if you buy a lot, but very dangerous as acid that strong can do a lot of damage. This would come from a chemical supply house.

When cut down to between 4% and 6% acid and the remainder distilled water, it is sold in grocery stores. White vinegar. Red wine vinegar has the same chemical properties but tends to stain rugs. Still I have known at least two cleaners try to save money by using red wine vinegar they had in their home rather than buying a product made for rugs. :eek:
Thanks Scott!!!
 

Jim Davisson

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Heinz cleaning vinegar is stronger than white distilled vinegar with reduced salad odor and a great value. If you are interested in glacial acetic acid, talk to your local dry cleaner. Y'all can trade out work and learn from each other. Ask to watch him/her use the steam table and discuss how they approach stains on natural fibers, this person will show you more than you thought you could know about stain removal. Buy them lunch, dinner and dessert, drinks, etc...

Young's cleaners in Concord, NC has been in the same location since 1941. The best visits to anywhere in my years as a professional cleaner has been there talking to someone with more experience in stain removal than anyone else I have had as a mentor or instructor ever. These people literally eat, sleep and breath tough stains.

Dry cleaners can and will farm out rug and tapestry cleaning to other firms. If you are positioned right this is a great revenue stream usually sustainable with minor kickbacks. Be smart my friends.
 

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$4 per square foot. $5 per square foot if there’s urine. $150 minimum for small rugs.
Hi Todd, like your idea for your rug pit.

Do you use a vacuum first and what's your drying process like?
 

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They're booku bucks. Just go get a large tarp as a liner and surround it with your 50' vacuum hose and that should suffice for now.
Flood it down with Bridgepoints Wool Medic. Let it dwell for an eternity. Water claw extract. Rinse, rinse, rinse with Bridgepoint Wool Zone. If smell remains hit it with Bridgepoints Hydrocide For Wool.
Of course check for color fastness (urine is known to make dyes in rugs unstable)
When you first flood it down with wool medic does that also act as a stabilizer the way dye-loc would work?

Also, would you flood it down with an inline sprayer or fill the 'washout' (tarp) with water and wool medic? And how much wool medic to use if the latter?

Also, in your scenario when you say rinse, rinse, rinse how are you doing that? Just flooding with water or using a wand?

Thank you in advance as you can tell I am trying to understand the process myself.
 

Select

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Mar 3, 2019
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John Cartegna
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United States
They're booku bucks. Just go get a large tarp as a liner and surround it with your 50' vacuum hose and that should suffice for now.
Flood it down with Bridgepoints Wool Medic. Let it dwell for an eternity. Water claw extract. Rinse, rinse, rinse with Bridgepoint Wool Zone. If smell remains hit it with Bridgepoints Hydrocide For Wool.
Of course check for color fastness (urine is known to make dyes in rugs unstable)
When you first flood it down with wool medic does that also act as a stabilizer the way dye-loc would work?

Also, would you flood it down with an inline sprayer or fill the 'washout' (tarp) with water and wool medic? And how much wool medic to use if the latter?

Also, in your scenario when you say rinse, rinse, rinse how are you doing that? Just flooding with water or using a wand?

Thank you in advance as you can tell I am trying to understand the process myself.
 

Scott W

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Feb 14, 2006
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West Jordan, UT
When you first flood it down with wool medic does that also act as a stabilizer the way dye-loc would work?

Also, would you flood it down with an inline sprayer or fill the 'washout' (tarp) with water and wool medic? And how much wool medic to use if the latter?

Also, in your scenario when you say rinse, rinse, rinse how are you doing that? Just flooding with water or using a wand?

Thank you in advance as you can tell I am trying to understand the process myself.
Wool Medic stabilizes acid dyes (the most commonly used dyes for wool) by virtue of being an acid. The stabilizing part is similar to the way acetic acid or vinegar would work. Wool Medic has other ingredients that do the cleaning and urine removal.

Dye-Loc "stabilizes" dyes by a very different type of chemistry called branching. This changes dye receptor sites in wool and cotton so that dyes do not easily attach to the dye sites. Fugitive dyes tend to stay suspended in the water and rinse away.

Both technologies can be used on the same rug.
 
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