Travertine Tabletop Questions

Jun 20, 2017
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Nicholas Bokas
I'm going to check out a travertine (I'm assuming from the pics, will test) tabletop this week and I'd like some pointers. I plan to hone, clean, and seal. Generally I do this with diamond pads on my 17" 175 but this is not a floor. Should I pick up an angle grinder or buffer so I can use smaller pads?

As far as the sealing, I have used impregnating sealer in the past with travertine with nice results. I'll take any recommendations on how to make this table look as amazing as possible. Thanks in advance!
 

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Grn Steamer

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Hold on to your shorts. Here's my two cents. I'd do it the same way you do a floor. It's a substantial table and should be fine with your floor machine on it. This would be much faster than doing it by hand...and with better results. Bring lots of drop cloths and tape!
 
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Jun 20, 2017
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Nicholas Bokas
Get the Makita angle grinder with variable speed. Most angle grinders turn faster than a 175" floor machine. You will want to run between 175 and 600 RPM depending upon the grit used.
Thanks for the recommendation. I've been thinking about adding an angle grinder to my arsenal. Can you help me with a model number for this grinder? I found a Makita "Electric Stone Polisher" that has an integrated water line (Model PW5001C) but it's speed range is 2000-4000 RPM. Way too fast.
 
Jun 20, 2017
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I think what I'm looking for is a variable speed polisher and not a grinder. The Makita 9237C seems to fit the bill, in which case I'll have to order 7" diamond pads. I don't think I can find those locally.
 

Scott W

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Jun 20, 2017
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I inspected the table today and it will need to be stripped (no surprise). Any advice on how to keep the slurry contained? I'll cover the wood floor beneath it, but I think I need to create a ridge around the tabletop. Thanks.
 

Scott W

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Dafloorman

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I inspected the table today and it will need to be stripped (no surprise). Any advice on how to keep the slurry contained? I'll cover the wood floor beneath it, but I think I need to create a ridge around the tabletop. Thanks.

We restore those all of the time, we usually place blue tape around all of the edges, use a hand machine (Milwaukee) 5x (powder polish), rinse with a neutral cleaner, dry, seal (Clear Water Based Sealer), and we do a quick polish with 3N1 (polish in a can). I do not like topicals, waxes, impregnating sealers or finishes. We use the natural powder polish (5x). That’s probably why you need to strip off whatever is on it?
b0616af9cd259f627936abcba372edaa.jpg


Also in many cases we do not need to diamond grind these tops, if there’s a bunch of scratches, yes.
 
Jun 20, 2017
51
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Nicholas Bokas
We restore those all of the time, we usually place blue tape around all of the edges, use a hand machine (Milwaukee) 5x (powder polish), rinse with a neutral cleaner, dry, seal (Clear Water Based Sealer), and we do a quick polish with 3N1 (polish in a can). I do not like topicals, waxes, impregnating sealers or finishes. We use the natural powder polish (5x). That’s probably why you need to strip off whatever is on it?

Also in many cases we do not need to diamond grind these tops, if there’s a bunch of scratches, yes.

I've never heard of "polish in a can" but I'll check it out in the future. I generally stick to solvent-based sealers, mainly because I've read that they are preferable for natural stone applications. That may or may not be true, but at this point that's what I've become comfortable with. The client wants a matte finish, which is why I was planning to just hone the surface with diamond pads and not polish. There are a bunch of scratches but none are very deep. Do you mind sharing what water-based sealer you like to use?
 
Jun 20, 2017
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Nicholas Bokas
Get some plastic lawn edging. cut to between 25" and 30". Form a circle. Staple the ends together to make a circle. Place this around your tool. It will move with the tool.
Here is the plastic lawn edging material - https://www.homedepot.com/p/Valley-...nal-Black-Plastic-Lawn-Edging-RD-60/100058957

I have lawn edging that I sometimes use around my 175 machine, and this would work except for the corners. I'm thinking to just attach the lawn edging to the table in a rectangle. Still thinking this through.
 

Dafloorman

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I've never heard of "polish in a can" but I'll check it out in the future. I generally stick to solvent-based sealers, mainly because I've read that they are preferable for natural stone applications. That may or may not be true, but at this point that's what I've become comfortable with. The client wants a matte finish, which is why I was planning to just hone the surface with diamond pads and not polish. There are a bunch of scratches but none are very deep. Do you mind sharing what water-based sealer you like to use?

Stone Tech is a good one.