Tired of deodorizers that don't work

Ara Klujian

Moderator & TMF Repair Expert
Moderator
Premium VIP
Jun 19, 2008
3,291
238
63
44
Chicago, IL
www.peterklujiancarpet.com
Real Name
ARA KLUJIAN
Business Location
United States
I'm fed up with deodorizers that do not keep their scent on freshly cleaned carpets and rugs. Everytime I spray deodorizers or mix into my stock solution, the next day when I inspect the area rugs the scent is gone. It makes me mad because I don't want mt customers to think I'm ripping the off. I currently use the Bridgepoint line. It smells good while I'm cleaning but that's about all. I had the same problem with Matrix line. I made the switch from Matrix to Bridgepoint for this reason and the fact that Matrix does not have directions for an after cleaning application. So it's useless to me. I want a deodorizer that smells good and stays that way after the carpet is dry. I use Hydrocide extreme, but there's no way I'm using that stuff on general purpose deodorizing because of the cost. I charge allot for my services but that doesn't mean I have to break the bank on all my chemicals. There has to be a better cost effective solution available. Does anybody have any suggestions?
 

wandwizard

Randy Dockins
Premium VIP
Nov 12, 2008
8,310
3,137
113
Real Name
Randy Dockins
Business Location
United States
I think the whole purpose of these nice scents is more psychological. You know, if it smells clean it is clean. I'd focus on a scent your customers are thrilled with not so much on ones that linger for days on end. Truth is I don't think you want it lingering. I guarantee you there will be some folks who don't like that.

These are scents to please the senses. The smell sells! We both know they really don't do anything else. Hence, they're a lot cheaper than true deodorizers which actually neutralize odors. You're selling a temporary nice smell that is NOT meant to last very long. That's the whole point IMHO. Having it linger too long can backfire on you.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Tanya Jarrett

Ara Klujian

Moderator & TMF Repair Expert
Moderator
Premium VIP
Jun 19, 2008
3,291
238
63
44
Chicago, IL
www.peterklujiancarpet.com
Real Name
ARA KLUJIAN
Business Location
United States
I think the whole purpose of these nice scents is more psychological. You know, if it smells clean it is clean. I'd focus on a scent your customers are thrilled with not so much on ones that linger for days on end. Truth is I don't think you want it lingering. I guarantee you there will be some folks who don't like that.

These are scents to please the senses. The smell sells! We both know they really don't do anything else. Hence, they're a lot cheaper than true deodorizers which actually neutralize odors. You're selling a temporary nice smell that is NOT meant to last very long. That's the whole point IMHO. Having it linger too long can backfire on you.
What about area rugs that are wrapped in paper or plastic? When I unroll it in the customers home there should be a nice fragrance if they pay for it. How come when I spray fabreze on my couch it lasts for days?
I sprayed Bridgepoint Cherry on a rug the other day. The next morning it smelled like ABSOLUTELY NOTHING!!!!! And I even made sure to add a little more concentrate because I knew it would not smell. I'm not the chemist but I do know that there should be at least a faint scent if I'm applying a deodorizer. Otherwise it's just snake oil!!! IMO
 

rob allen

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Sep 5, 2007
34,588
17,198
113
Va.
www.drynclean.com
Real Name
Robert Allen,Jr.
Business Location
United States
We spray and have a little trick we do. I'll see if I can snap a pic for you.
 

OxiFreshGuy

Well-Known Member
Nov 12, 2016
923
760
93
Real Name
Matthew Frein
Business Location
United States
Febreze lasts for days because its leaving a chemical film...

There are no free lunches in this world. Everything is a trade off
 

Ara Klujian

Moderator & TMF Repair Expert
Moderator
Premium VIP
Jun 19, 2008
3,291
238
63
44
Chicago, IL
www.peterklujiancarpet.com
Real Name
ARA KLUJIAN
Business Location
United States
Matrix All fiber rinse has really nice scent and there is a post cleaning application instructions. I always get compliments when I clean with that in customers house. The scent of that lingers allot longer than any deodorizer I've used lately. Plus it's much cheaper than deodorizer. I might start using that as my add on deodorizer sale! The only problem with that is I like to use products I can mix in my stock solution and have the option of post spray.
 

Jim Davisson

Well-Known Member
Aug 23, 2016
3,452
3,928
113
Serving the greater Charlotte area
Real Name
James Davisson
Business Location
United States
Water based deodorizers are limited in lasting effect, oil or solvent based linger much longer, but nothing beats Last Resort.... Hard to make it go away lol

I don't deodorize the face fibers of rugs only the back side before rolling for delivery. A very light Newline Lemonsolv or Tabac Attack always gets a rave reaction from customers.
 

Mama Fen

Well-Known Member
Jul 18, 2012
3,201
3,390
113
Real Name
no name
Business Location
United States
Considering that Last Resort is designed to cover up the smell of decomposing bodies, I bet it lasts a long time indeed, lol! You can tell which spot it inhabits on my shelving - always smells like LR no matter how long it's been since a bottle was there. The stuff even penetrates metal.

Two things work against you with deodorizers when it comes to longevity.

One is your own nose.

Our brains can only process so much sensory input at any given time. Priority must be given to important things like dangers (rot, smoke, gasoline, etc) or benefits (cooking food, ladies' perfume, etc). Neutral scents that are associated with neither hazard nor reward sometimes have to be ignored or 'turned off' by the brain in order to let other processes take effect. Hence, overexposure to a deodorizer will eventually make you unable to smell it.

Your brain is literally being told by the olfactory lobe: "Hey guys, we've smelled this orange-y stuff before and nothing good OR bad happened. So let's not waste time with it, eh? There's a barbecue happening down the street, let's tell him how hungry he is instead." The same process happens in the customer's brain, too - the smell may still be there, but after a few hours to a few days their brain has elected to ignore it.

This is why crazy cat ladies can't smell the urine in their houses. "Nose-blindness" is a real syndrome with a biological cause that is rooted in survival.



The other thing working against you is the medium in which the deodorizer is suspended.

Water is the most common (and least hazardous) solvent for deodorizers. All scents are stronger when there is moisture present, so a water-based deodorizer will be at its peak when it's wet. But we keep the air inside buildings artificially dry to prevent microbial growth and allow easier temperature regulation, and as such your deodorizer dries pretty quickly. As it dries, it loses a bit of potency and it takes air flow to "re-stir" the scent molecules back into the environment. Water can also only hold so much scent before suspension is lost, and scent molecules that go up the snoot are lost to the air for good, so eventually there's simply no more left to smell.

Solvent-based or oil-based deodorizers will last longer but can be overwhelming if misused (at which point they become a malodor), so it takes a practiced hand to use them effectively. Some can also have a damaging or discoloring effect on certain surfaces, so their scope of use can be limited. They are also designed to be diluted or cut with alcohol or OMS rather than water, which can be a pain.

Also, some customers may run allergen-blocking filters in their HVACs, and commercial buildings may have UV sanitizers, HEPA filtration, and the like... all of which will filter out scent particles to at least some degree. These engineering controls aren't smart and can't tell "good" odor from "bad", so they simply remove everything. Bye-bye blueberry muffins.



None of this is to say that deodorizers are worthless - in fact, quite the opposite. Their very transience works in your favor.

What better add-on or thank-you gift than to offer a customer a bottle of their favorite deodorizer, already diluted for their convenience, to keep their house smelling sweet and fresh until your next visit?

There are many private-labeling programs out there that offer such a thing, and the guys in this area who use them report a large percentage of repeat customers because the bottle keeps their information in the customer's hand.

The science of odor, and how we perceive it, is one of the most intricate and fascinating things about this industry. A "good" smell can make a cleaner a hero before he even starts cleaning... but a residual "bad" smell (or even the false perception of a bad smell, which is also a real thing and thus isn't false at all!) can make an unhappy customer even if their floors are spotless enough to eat off of.

It's amazing what a difference it makes when a savvy technician understands how the brain processes odors... and how best to use that to his/her advantage on a jobsite.
 

Jim Davisson

Well-Known Member
Aug 23, 2016
3,452
3,928
113
Serving the greater Charlotte area
Real Name
James Davisson
Business Location
United States
Considering that Last Resort is designed to cover up the smell of decomposing bodies, I bet it lasts a long time indeed, lol! You can tell which spot it inhabits on my shelving - always smells like LR no matter how long it's been since a bottle was there. The stuff even penetrates metal.

Two things work against you with deodorizers when it comes to longevity.

One is your own nose.

Our brains can only process so much sensory input at any given time. Priority must be given to important things like dangers (rot, smoke, gasoline, etc) or benefits (cooking food, ladies' perfume, etc). Neutral scents that are associated with neither hazard nor reward sometimes have to be ignored or 'turned off' by the brain in order to let other processes take effect. Hence, overexposure to a deodorizer will eventually make you unable to smell it.

Your brain is literally being told by the olfactory lobe: "Hey guys, we've smelled this orange-y stuff before and nothing good OR bad happened. So let's not waste time with it, eh? There's a barbecue happening down the street, let's tell him how hungry he is instead." The same process happens in the customer's brain, too - the smell may still be there, but after a few hours to a few days their brain has elected to ignore it.

This is why crazy cat ladies can't smell the urine in their houses. "Nose-blindness" is a real syndrome with a biological cause that is rooted in survival.



The other thing working against you is the medium in which the deodorizer is suspended.

Water is the most common (and least hazardous) solvent for deodorizers. All scents are stronger when there is moisture present, so a water-based deodorizer will be at its peak when it's wet. But we keep the air inside buildings artificially dry to prevent microbial growth and allow easier temperature regulation, and as such your deodorizer dries pretty quickly. As it dries, it loses a bit of potency and it takes air flow to "re-stir" the scent molecules back into the environment. Water can also only hold so much scent before suspension is lost, and scent molecules that go up the snoot are lost to the air for good, so eventually there's simply no more left to smell.

Solvent-based or oil-based deodorizers will last longer but can be overwhelming if misused (at which point they become a malodor), so it takes a practiced hand to use them effectively. Some can also have a damaging or discoloring effect on certain surfaces, so their scope of use can be limited. They are also designed to be diluted or cut with alcohol or OMS rather than water, which can be a pain.

Also, some customers may run allergen-blocking filters in their HVACs, and commercial buildings may have UV sanitizers, HEPA filtration, and the like... all of which will filter out scent particles to at least some degree. These engineering controls aren't smart and can't tell "good" odor from "bad", so they simply remove everything. Bye-bye blueberry muffins.



None of this is to say that deodorizers are worthless - in fact, quite the opposite. Their very transience works in your favor.

What better add-on or thank-you gift than to offer a customer a bottle of their favorite deodorizer, already diluted for their convenience, to keep their house smelling sweet and fresh until your next visit?

There are many private-labeling programs out there that offer such a thing, and the guys in this area who use them report a large percentage of repeat customers because the bottle keeps their information in the customer's hand.

The science of odor, and how we perceive it, is one of the most intricate and fascinating things about this industry. A "good" smell can make a cleaner a hero before he even starts cleaning... but a residual "bad" smell (or even the false perception of a bad smell, which is also a real thing and thus isn't false at all!) can make an unhappy customer even if their floors are spotless enough to eat off of.

It's amazing what a difference it makes when a savvy technician understands how the brain processes odors... and how best to use that to his/her advantage on a jobsite.
I'm pretty sure I'm one of the few that keeps you stocking last resort... I couldn't imagine, not having it on the van.
 

Luky

Well-Known Member
Nov 29, 2013
1,599
883
113
59
Chicagoland
Real Name
Marian Lukacisin
Business Location
United States
Water based deodorizers are limited in lasting effect, oil or solvent based linger much longer, but nothing beats Last Resort.... Hard to make it go away lol

I don't deodorize the face fibers of rugs only the back side before rolling for delivery. A very light Newline Lemonsolv or Tabac Attack always gets a rave reaction from customers.
 

Attachments

  • Like
Reactions: OneBlueSummer

Luky

Well-Known Member
Nov 29, 2013
1,599
883
113
59
Chicagoland
Real Name
Marian Lukacisin
Business Location
United States
Considering that Last Resort is designed to cover up the smell of decomposing bodies, I bet it lasts a long time indeed, lol! You can tell which spot it inhabits on my shelving - always smells like LR no matter how long it's been since a bottle was there. The stuff even penetrates metal.

Two things work against you with deodorizers when it comes to longevity.

One is your own nose.

Our brains can only process so much sensory input at any given time. Priority must be given to important things like dangers (rot, smoke, gasoline, etc) or benefits (cooking food, ladies' perfume, etc). Neutral scents that are associated with neither hazard nor reward sometimes have to be ignored or 'turned off' by the brain in order to let other processes take effect. Hence, overexposure to a deodorizer will eventually make you unable to smell it.

Your brain is literally being told by the olfactory lobe: "Hey guys, we've smelled this orange-y stuff before and nothing good OR bad happened. So let's not waste time with it, eh? There's a barbecue happening down the street, let's tell him how hungry he is instead." The same process happens in the customer's brain, too - the smell may still be there, but after a few hours to a few days their brain has elected to ignore it.

This is why crazy cat ladies can't smell the urine in their houses. "Nose-blindness" is a real syndrome with a biological cause that is rooted in survival.



The other thing working against you is the medium in which the deodorizer is suspended.

Water is the most common (and least hazardous) solvent for deodorizers. All scents are stronger when there is moisture present, so a water-based deodorizer will be at its peak when it's wet. But we keep the air inside buildings artificially dry to prevent microbial growth and allow easier temperature regulation, and as such your deodorizer dries pretty quickly. As it dries, it loses a bit of potency and it takes air flow to "re-stir" the scent molecules back into the environment. Water can also only hold so much scent before suspension is lost, and scent molecules that go up the snoot are lost to the air for good, so eventually there's simply no more left to smell.

Solvent-based or oil-based deodorizers will last longer but can be overwhelming if misused (at which point they become a malodor), so it takes a practiced hand to use them effectively. Some can also have a damaging or discoloring effect on certain surfaces, so their scope of use can be limited. They are also designed to be diluted or cut with alcohol or OMS rather than water, which can be a pain.

Also, some customers may run allergen-blocking filters in their HVACs, and commercial buildings may have UV sanitizers, HEPA filtration, and the like... all of which will filter out scent particles to at least some degree. These engineering controls aren't smart and can't tell "good" odor from "bad", so they simply remove everything. Bye-bye blueberry muffins.



None of this is to say that deodorizers are worthless - in fact, quite the opposite. Their very transience works in your favor.

What better add-on or thank-you gift than to offer a customer a bottle of their favorite deodorizer, already diluted for their convenience, to keep their house smelling sweet and fresh until your next visit?

There are many private-labeling programs out there that offer such a thing, and the guys in this area who use them report a large percentage of repeat customers because the bottle keeps their information in the customer's hand.

The science of odor, and how we perceive it, is one of the most intricate and fascinating things about this industry. A "good" smell can make a cleaner a hero before he even starts cleaning... but a residual "bad" smell (or even the false perception of a bad smell, which is also a real thing and thus isn't false at all!) can make an unhappy customer even if their floors are spotless enough to eat off of.

It's amazing what a difference it makes when a savvy technician understands how the brain processes odors... and how best to use that to his/her advantage on a jobsite.
Reacting to a bad, good smells statement. To some customers good scent is a bad smell. Personal preference, right? To share my experience, best feedback so far was on distant smell of Prochem fiber rinse.
Chem.meter set at 4-5gpm). Scent lingers longer for some reason..
 

ACP

Well-Known Member
Apr 9, 2014
3,461
2,449
113
35
Washington
Real Name
Bjorn Marshall
What about area rugs that are wrapped in paper or plastic? When I unroll it in the customers home there should be a nice fragrance if they pay for it. How come when I spray fabreze on my couch it lasts for days?
I sprayed Bridgepoint Cherry on a rug the other day. The next morning it smelled like ABSOLUTELY NOTHING!!!!! And I even made sure to add a little more concentrate because I knew it would not smell. I'm not the chemist but I do know that there should be at least a faint scent if I'm applying a deodorizer. Otherwise it's just snake oil!!! IMO
dryer sheets, you can find some really nice smelling ones
 

ACP

Well-Known Member
Apr 9, 2014
3,461
2,449
113
35
Washington
Real Name
Bjorn Marshall
Joe Bristor has the most powerful deo ive ever seen or used... but youve been warned, that sh!t is crazy strong.

I sprayed some with one of our multi sprayers 5 years ago, and still to this day when we use that multi sprayer there is hints of it. It sat unused for about 3 years but since then we have ran many many gallons through it.

I think he calls it joedorcide lol
 

sbsscn

Well-Known Member
Sep 17, 2009
2,217
711
113
california
Real Name
Arm Ben
Business Location
United States
Want strong try
spraying a light mist of CTI's/pros choice Molecular modifier on the back of a full synthetic rug then let me know if that works.

on natural try running a vaportek through a air tunnel (you can make one out of an old water heater box, lay it side ways use some styrofoam blocks to suspend it and run a vaportek with high air velocity fan.

Or
go to a organic store and buy lavender oil or lemon oil or Orange oil, peppermint oil or cinnamon oil. itll be expensive but will be nice.

mix 2 -4 ounces [or experiment on your own formula] to 1 gallon of water and lightly mist the backing of any type of rug with your mix

works but i dont like this recipe
You can also use alcohol (oil 1 oz to 32 oz alcohol) but do experiment with different oils before applying to rug.