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Tile callbacks due to blushing/residue spots

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ronman

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I've only been cleaning tile and grout for 10 years now, and I think I'm overdue to explore this issue with the rest of you guys.
We occasionally get callbacks due to patches of filmy kind of a residue in places. It used to be a more common problem when I used extra strong prespray, but we have cut way back on the strength and that's helped a lot.
I'm thinking it may be due to the prespray drying before its rinsed.
What experience have you guys had with this and what are the best techniques have you found most efficient to prevent it?
I have an old timer friend who, after 38 years in the business swore that he turned the AC off and did small sections at a time to prevent it from drying on the tile.
In this tropical heat and humidity, not something I care to do.
We've been using TMF Tilemaster.
 

Timothyscarpet

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Are the spots usually on tile or in grout lines? I have been having issues on occasion with the grout lines absorbing the cleaner and not drying out resulting in darker spots in grout? One other time we had a call back for the tiles with haze and I think it was due to the water not being dryed fast enough after cleaning .
 

ronman

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Are the spots usually on tile or in grout lines? I have been having issues on occasion with the grout lines absorbing the cleaner and not drying out resulting in darker spots in grout? One other time we had a call back for the tiles with haze and I think it was due to the water not being dryed fast enough after cleaning .
Not on the grout lines, but a haze on the tiles. When I used 2 or 3 scoops per gallon, the haze had to be buffed off with a 175 and a horsehair pad. The other day I had it happen, after one scoop per gallon, and the haze came up with a damp paper towel followed by a dry paper towel.
 

OxiFreshGuy

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If it's not natural stone then it's a chemical residue. I only use a half scoop or gallon typically.
 
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Timothyscarpet

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Not on the grout lines, but a haze on the tiles. When I used 2 or 3 scoops per gallon, the haze had to be buffed off with a 175 and a horsehair pad. The other day I had it happen, after one scoop per gallon, and the haze came up with a damp paper towel followed by a dry paper towel.
Are you rinsing with water only? I always follow up with a dry microfiber to get tiles dryed down asap. I'm cleaning with procyons t&g cleaner
 

ronman

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Ceramic and porcelain. I noticed a big difference going from 2 and 3 scoops to one, so maybe we'll try a half scoop.
The other thing we noticed is that with one scoop, it will mop off even if its dry, whereas, with 2 plus scoops it takes a machine to and horsehair pad to buff it off.
 

Hacky-sack

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May 22, 2020
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Gotta rinse well with any powdered pre spray.
This is why I'm not a fan of them.

Try switching to stripper.

It's very similar chemistry wise to tile master, grout master etc....but cleans and rinses much better.
 
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Rick F

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Try 2790 concrete cleaner i have been using it for years
 
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Hacky-sack

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Try 2790 concrete cleaner i have been using it for years
2790 is potassium hydroxide. Very similar to sodium hydroxide but more expensive.

I've been using lye (sodium hydroxide) on tough tile cleaning situations for some time now.

Work amazing
 
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Mama Fen

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2790 is potassium hydroxide. Very similar to sodium hydroxide but more expensive.

I've been using lye (sodium hydroxide) on tough tile cleaning situations for some time now.

Work amazing
Potash (potassium hydroxide) and lye (sodium hydroxide) are both excellent for saponifying oily soils, but lye is a wee bit more dangerous to work with. Use caution.

Virtually EVERY time we've had guys in this area with haze problems, the solution has been to re-clean with a very dilute version of the original chemical (about half strength or less). Like dissolves like, so if your chems dried on the surface before you could rinse them away then a "roomy suspension" of the same chems will make them far easier to remove than fresh water.
 
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Hacky-sack

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Potash (potassium hydroxide) and lye (sodium hydroxide) are both excellent for saponifying oily soils, but lye is a wee bit more dangerous to work with. Use caution.

Virtually EVERY time we've had guys in this area with haze problems, the solution has been to re-clean with a very dilute version of the original chemical (about half strength or less). Like dissolves like, so if your chems dried on the surface before you could rinse them away then a "roomy suspension" of the same chems will make them far easier to remove than fresh water.
Straight lye is sketch of course.
At the dilution ratio I employ it isnt.
I get it in gallon capacity as Oven Cleaner.

Its pre diluted and then I dilute it further.

A little goes a long way with lye
 
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ronman

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I should have known to post about this a long time ago!!
Excellent feedback guys, thanks so much!!
The most obvious answer is powder versus premixed!!
Can't believe I didn't think of that.
Time to experiment with liquids.
Another question.
I've been doing tile with a gheko wand up till this year, when I picked up a 12" spinner.
We love the spinner far better than the wand for cleaning power, but it leaves an ungodly amount of water behind.
I use a cuban mop, and get it up, but it adds a lot of time to the job compared to the wand.
Are there any tricks or strategies I'm missing?
 

Thewy

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I should have known to post about this a long time ago!!
Excellent feedback guys, thanks so much!!
The most obvious answer is powder versus premixed!!
Can't believe I didn't think of that.
Time to experiment with liquids.
Another question.
I've been doing tile with a gheko wand up till this year, when I picked up a 12" spinner.
We love the spinner far better than the wand for cleaning power, but it leaves an ungodly amount of water behind.
I use a cuban mop, and get it up, but it adds a lot of time to the job compared to the wand.
Are there any tricks or strategies I'm missing?
You can turn down the pressure, have a more efficient vacuum recovery or try a different spinner like in video below.
 

Hacky-sack

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I should have known to post about this a long time ago!!
Excellent feedback guys, thanks so much!!
The most obvious answer is powder versus premixed!!
Can't believe I didn't think of that.
Time to experiment with liquids.
Another question.
I've been doing tile with a gheko wand up till this year, when I picked up a 12" spinner.
We love the spinner far better than the wand for cleaning power, but it leaves an ungodly amount of water behind.
I use a cuban mop, and get it up, but it adds a lot of time to the job compared to the wand.
Are there any tricks or strategies I'm missing?
Shouldn't need to post mop I'd rinse is done well.

Many guys spend far too much time rinsing cuz their pre treatment doesn't include agitation.

I like to shower feed my pre treat through a 175 on a grit brush with a splash guard.

Gekko edger and SX12 the field.

An air mover dropped does the rest.
 

Hacky-sack

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My strategy allows me to clean thoroughly at well over 500 square feet per hour.

About 1000 feet per hour on open commercial spaces.
 

PistolPete

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Use Groutmaster instead of Tilemaster, it's a better formula.
I use 2-3 scoops per gallon every day. I only do tile & grout.

Mix pre-spray with hot tap water.
Flood grout lines first using pump up sprayer with low pressure. I rarely agitate.
Then prior to cleaning mist the whole tiled area.
Work in small sections, 10x10 (15x15 if the grout isn't too bad.)
Take your time cleaning, I usually do 2 passes to make sure it's rinsed well.
Then take a flat mop and even out any spots and put a fan on the area.
I also clean into the area so I don't drag the hoses through the pre-spray.

If you do get any residue use an alcohol glass cleaner (Hopes) and a rag. It comes right off with just a wipe.
 

Hacky-sack

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May 22, 2020
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Use Groutmaster instead of Tilemaster, it's a better formula.
I use 2-3 scoops per gallon every day. I only do tile & grout.

Mix pre-spray with hot tap water.
Flood grout lines first using pump up sprayer with low pressure. I rarely agitate.
Then prior to cleaning mist the whole tiled area.
Work in small sections, 10x10 (15x15 if the grout isn't too bad.)
Take your time cleaning, I usually do 2 passes to make sure it's rinsed well.
Then take a flat mop and even out any spots and put a fan on the area.
I also clean into the area so I don't drag the hoses through the pre-spray.

If you do get any residue use an alcohol glass cleaner (Hopes) and a rag. It comes right off with just a wipe.
I still contend that showerfeeding a liquid mix through a 175 w/splash guard and rinsing once and done is much faster.

2 step process that's extremely thorough.
 
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rob allen

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Tilemaster has a haze issue. Groutmaster rarely does. Just don't let it dry and rinse well. Also it's sodium hydroxide free. Though I am making a stripper for those who don't care about their health. Superheating, high pressure and atomizing sodium hydroxide based carpet and floor products delivers it straight into lung capillaries. Basically like smoking cigarettes.
 
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