The Real World (from ICS Board) | TruckMount Forums #1 Carpet Cleaning Forums

The Real World (from ICS Board)

Newman

Member
Oct 20, 2008
545
4
18
St. Charles, Illinois
Real Name
Chris Newman
if you are not 100% familiar with that area of expertise.
Thomas, Were you a 100% expert with every possible scenario on the first WDR job you were paid for?

The distributors can sell new equipment to replace down chemical sales. Marketing gurus can feed on your fears of famine
Good point Craig. Do not be sold equipment, purchase only what you need based on your own your research.

The IICRC will sit you in a class for three days, give you a multiple choice test written at a sixth grade level and make you believe you're ready for the wolves.
You have to start somewhere...

the good news is that there is still a viable market for qualified WDR companies with the grit to succeed!
Excellent point. May I add to your statement: the financial fortitude and grit to succeed!

I agree will all here, talk to your Insurance carrier before your first WDR job and purchase proper coverage.
 
Nov 13, 2008
186
0
16
Clarksville,TN
Real Name
Thomas Brennan
Business Location
United States
NO and No, But that wasn't the point. We all do have to start somewhere I started as most of us did...working for a carpet cleaning company here in the metropolis of Clarksville, Tennessee!!! It was his liability,not mine. for 5 years I learned from working for a carpet cleaning company in a 1984 Butler. BUT we are talking the 80's...there was not the liability there is now. There wasn't as many product that were out there being pushed on us, and clean care seminars from jeff bishop were the only classes we could find. so back to the question for the moment....
Should suppliers only sell to people who have some type of certification???
 

ACD

New Member
Jan 12, 2009
325
2
0
Rockland, Maine
Real Name
Aaron Dinsmore
Business Location
United States
Honestly the tone of these threads are getting old. I know every single one of you is absolutely the most gifted restoration contractor on the face of the earth and the chairman of your local Mensa chapter. I accept that you know more than I do and I do feel blessed that you share your knowledge. I am aware that any and all such actions on your part need to be delivered in as condescending a manner possible so that my feeble red neck mind can grasp the concept and understand how beneath you I am. :bigsmiley:

That said, I am certified in everything except IICRC senior carpet inspector. I am certified in mold remediation. I have my master pesticide applicators license. I have a class A CDL with double/triple trailer, tank, and haz-mat endorsements. I have a commercial pilots license and a flight instructor rating. I have flown sea planes. None of it means jack. The only training I got that was honest was from one old time sea plane bush pilot (my first instructor) that told me "The day you think you know it all is the day you had best stop flying. That is the day you are going to die." That one piece of advice has served me well in everything I have done. NEVER be afraid to ask if you don't know. NEVER be afraid to admit you don't know. And most importantly NEVER stop trying to learn more. When we started doing WD we took the IICRC course, bought a Dri-Eze 60 and 2 air movers. That was it. The IICRC had just started. Our first job was a washing machine hose failure. Within a year we were at 16 air movers and 6 120 dehu's. We have grown steadily. We have desiccant dehu's, Injecti-Dri's, negative air machines, zip walls, carpet installation equipment, and enough carpentry, painting, and other tools to start several companies. I have a 48ft storage trailer and a 40x40 building full of stuff. All the classes I took were good but none of them even came close to preparing you for the real world. I mean seriously you can get certified as a carpet tech and never even touch a wand. Book knowledge is one thing. I happen to be very good at taking tests but my retention of details is atrocious. I could not be a classroom teacher because I don't recall all the big words and specific numbers that impress the $500 a class students. What I do know is how to fix a loss. How I learned is from experience and trial and error. Most of the great equipment we have was purchased as we encountered a new challenge. How did I know what to get? I asked a fellow industry professional, or went home that night and researched suppliers products and found something that would work. I encounter new stuff every day. I can't even list all the stuff we have run into and had to deal with. Chimney rebuilding, granite countertop removal and replacement, foundations, main support beams, 6" deep frost ice on the inside of an attic on the roof sheathing, rabid raccoons, 3 story fuel oil spill, anything to do with a mobile home... you get the idea. What I'm getting at is you are never "fully qualified" for every situation. What makes you ready is the ability to recognize an issue and be able to formulate a plan to overcome it. Maybe you will fail. You will eat that part of the job and do it again this time correctly because you are more experienced because of it. Forums are great resources. You have to take what you read with a huge grain of salt. Occasionally you get some good advice. Usually what you get is a direction to go in pursuing your line of inquiry. Newbies, take the class. Get the insurance. Get some equipment and at first at least choose your battles. Turn down the 3 story flood in the Victorian Mansion. Take the "I just got home at my water heater leaked while I was at work and there is some water on my direct glue carpet on the concrete floor call". Step it up as you go. Ask questions of contacts in the biz. Ask questions on the forum. If you are made to feel stupid then PM someone. Generally when you PM someone they are more polite. Maybe someone will adopt you as their pet cleaner. (I have one already). What will eventually happen is you will develop a core group of contractors in your area and become an expert at finding specialists for new situations. There is nothing that can stop you then. Even if you still don't know everything.

Aaron
 
Nov 13, 2008
186
0
16
Clarksville,TN
Real Name
Thomas Brennan
Business Location
United States
Therein lies a huge problem.
Should a distributor sell only to...........Who??? Should they only sell to certified persons??? Should you have to have the CCT or some type of eqaliviant????


Please take a few minutes to read the start of the post to the end, if you just catch the last few comments it is easy to get off the the topic. I am not saying the "certification" is a golden ticket, no more than my degree in Economics made me a good carpet cleaner....
 

rob allen

Administrator
Staff member
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Sep 5, 2007
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Va.
www.drynclean.com
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Robert Allen,Jr.
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Thomas my point is that "selling" seems to take precedent over training. It goes on in many trades. I realize that. I know that motorcycle companies sell "out of the box" race bikes to anyone. I also know of many who have been maimed, paralyzed or seriously injured due to lack of training.

That being said, I understand the frustration by some in this post. By putting many in the trade without proper training is hurting us all in the end. Many insurance companies are steering the adjusters and the insured to the franchise chains. They want consistency and unfortunately with many cleaners getting into the restoration work who have no idea of what to do, sometimes end up over charging and under performing proper mitigation.

I am not placing the blame squarely on one organization but there are obvious reasons to not put cleaners by the dozen into a field without adequate training. And if no one says anything then there will be no change. Then the pie will continue to get smaller for legitimate companies like ours.


.
 
Nov 13, 2008
186
0
16
Clarksville,TN
Real Name
Thomas Brennan
Business Location
United States
I agree 100%, The focus of the post just got side-tracked a little....But what do you think about Selling anything to anyone?? Is that good for the industry?? Your right, I'm not placing the blame on just one side or organization. But like you if the topic is brought up for the better minds of the industry maybe we can change a few things and improve the industry for all ..,

let me give you a few personal examples..


My interlink supplier in Nashville sold me a E-tes machine a few years ago when they first came out... We took it on a job that had some wet hardwood floors. Set up the e-tes, tarped the floor, used matts, exaused the air at 90 degrees. Came back 8 hours later and metered the floor (20% WME). so I left it running till the next morn. On the following morning we had shrunk the wood slates right in front of the machine, left gaps about 1/8 of an inch...The cupping was down but We still ruined the wood floor and broke out the saw. I was sold a piece of equipment I didnt learn how to use......It was my fault. ( we now have a little more experience and own 2 e-tes machines, and the new ones are "smart") But my salesmen sold me a machine i didnt know how to use....Thats My Fault

Here is one more:
My same Nashville, TN interlink store sold an apartment complex, here in Carksville, a Dehu and about 4 airmovers. Now they dont call a cleaner or restoration company to handle the small floods, Cutting business from the cleaners that support them...should they sell only to cleaning companies??
 

johnnyone

Johnnyone
Apr 6, 2006
23
0
1
Albuquerque NM
www.bullseyecarpet.com
Real Name
John Kennaman
Business Location
United States
Got some good points, I started out that way. I surived the wolves, none paying adjustors, upset home owners....
Most of the mold I have seen in prexhistng. I get in the job and do it in 3 days and get out! Here my bill pay it...