the 14 pound Bowling Ball test for suction power!

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Jun 18, 2008
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Glide Pro
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#1
A few days back in more than 1 of my posts, I was asked to post the picture of our Titan machines lifting up a 10 lb bowling ball. That would have been too easy since I know all the machines I sell can do that quite easily, even at the end of 150 feet of 2" vac hose. The X3HL for example is able to support 30 lbs at that distance due to it's 24"HG lift ability. The X4 will be able to do the same. So to make things more interesting the bowling ball was made a 14 pound model and it was hooked up to our lowest powered machine, the X2HL with only 17"HG vacuum power. This is the result:




Even this just demonstrates a fraction of the power of this machine. I know it will do a lot more. I am currently looking for a 25 lb ball to show how strong it really is!:bigsmiley:
 

cleaningservicepros

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Jan 18, 2010
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Damon
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#2
Yes,

Larry Cobb posted this a couple of days ago on another board. Impressive.

How long is that hose?
 
Jun 18, 2008
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#3
I believe that is either an 8 ft or a 10 ft hose. I have asked Larry if he could fit at least 100 ft into the picture. There was some doubt about whether that much hose would fit, but Larry said he would try to see if the picture would work with that much hose in it. The X3 model of that machine will support a 30 lb weight, but I don't think they make a ball that heavy to show it.:)
 
Nov 25, 2010
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Brett Schwabenland
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#4
Put a quarter or popsicle stick under the edge of the cuff on one side to break the suction. Then try picking your 14LB bowling ball at 100 ft of 2 inch. You don't clean carpets with sealed suction.
 

Mr.E

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Mar 3, 2010
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Scott Ehrlich
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#5
I am sure she is a lovely girl but the boots are tragic.
 
Jun 18, 2008
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#7
Reminds me of the Oreck vacuum bowling ball test on TV years ago!




The difference is that vacuum was only generating about 1/2 pound of suction per sq inch Frank. It was only able to lift the ball by expending the surface area of the funnel to 28 sq inches. Because the machine shown is the strongest suction of any sold within the USA, it can generate over 8 -12 lbs per sq inch. The 3 sq inches surface area of the hose cuff is all it needs.:)
 
Jun 18, 2008
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Glide Pro
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#8
Put a quarter or popsicle stick under the edge of the cuff on one side to break the suction. Then try picking your 14LB bowling ball at 100 ft of 2 inch. You don't clean carpets with sealed suction.
No you don't Brett. But it is Lift power that generates cfm, not the other way around. When you have lots of hose attached, it is the machine that can generate the highest lift at the WCI that will generate the highest cfm as well. The more cfm generated under a 5/8" or 3/4" restriction(where most portable/wand combos work) the greater amount of both soil/water is removed from the carpet and the cleaner it is and the faster it dries. There is no question about that. That is the reason you want to use a machine that develops great lift. Take care of that and the rest looks after itself.:)
 
Nov 25, 2010
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Brett Schwabenland
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#9
I pick a 9lb weight with the popsicle stick to break the suction at 100ft of 2 inch. Gives me an idea of lift and cfm. Now if someone would lift 9lbs at 100 and then measure the cfm and lift with a gauge and report the numbers, everyone would be able to test their own machines with weights vs buying gauges. 50, 100,150,200 would be good testing lengths. It's not easy lifting weight with broken suction.
 
Jun 18, 2008
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#10
Lifting 9 lbs at 100 ft with broken lift of 1/8" would be easy to do on a system strong enough to support 30 lbs with unbroken lift. That would roughly be equivalant to 3/4" restriction on the system. Our Titan X3HL could do that. Not sure about the X2HL. I would need to test that to be sure.:)
 
Nov 25, 2010
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Brett Schwabenland
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#11
Ken, what do you think about the weight, sealed or unsealed with gauges used for testing at the same hose length the weight was picked as a reference point for people who want to test their own systems? I'd like to know what 9lbs with broken suction at 100ft equals in cfm and lift. I'm running 6 vacs. 3 3stages and 3 2 stages to lift that 9lbs with broken suction at 100ft of 2 inch. 4 cords.
 
Jun 18, 2008
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#12
Did some calculations about how heavy a load the X3HL could support at 100 ft out with a 1/8" vacuum break.

The lift is still around 10"HG which works out to a 5 lbs per sq inch lift potential. The 2" hose cuff has 3.14" of area.

So 5 lbs/in x 3.14" = 15.7 lbs could still be lifted.

In other words it could lift the weight of that 14 lb ball no problem.

In the case of the X2HL it generates a pressure drop of 3.57 pounds lift/sq inch at that distance.

So 3.57 lbs X 3.14 sq inches= 11.2 lbs of lift.

So it could easily lift the 9 lb ball's weight as well.:)
 
Nov 25, 2010
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Brett Schwabenland
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#13
I asume your still using sealed suction. How can we convert sealed suction weights to cfm and lift numbers using math, or do you have to use gauges?
 
Jun 18, 2008
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#14
BTW, it is not that hard for anyone to calculate the Lift and CFM that anyone has in their system regardless of wether it is set up in series or parallel configuration. All you need to do to get it is have an in-line lift guage that will show you the lift at 50 ft out, 100 ft out and 150 ft out. You fit it between the hose cuffs at those distances. You attach a wand at the far end of the hose and put the wandhead down on wet or damp carpet to simurate the resistance of cleaning. Record the lift the guage is showing. To find out how much cfm that is generating use this table:

Opening(in inches)......Lift(in inches WL).............CFM....................Airwatts


.875".........................77.68(P).. .........................87.2................... ...........
.................................69.98(S )...........................81.1(-7%).................665....

.750".........................88.12(P).. .........................68.0................... ...........
.................................97.85(S) ...........................70.1(+3%)............ ....804....


.625".......................100.5(P).... .........................50.2................... ...............
...............................132.31(S) ...........................56.3(+12%)............ ...874....

.500".......................109.64(P)... ........................33.5.................... ..............
...............................163.o9(S). ..........................39.9(+19%)............ ...764.....

If you are hooked up in series and see 97"WL at 50 ft out you see by the chart that you have 70 cfm .

That is 3/4" restriction. To find out to how high a weight you could lift with that much vac power do this calculation:

97"WL/13.7 = 7 .08 HG

7.08HG /2 = 3.54 lbs/sq inch

2" hose cuff has 3.14 sq inches of area

3.14sq"area X 3.54 lbs pressure drop = 11.11 Lift ability

If you have a parallel vacuum system and measure 88"WL instead you have 68 cfm.

To find lift ability of your system with that you plug your numbers in like the series example:

88"WL /13.7 = 6.42"HG

6.42"HG / 2 = 3.21 lb per inch

3.21 lb/in X 3.14 sq inches = 10.1 pounds

So your system would be able to lift a 10 pound weight at that distance.

Put the number on the chart onto graph paper and you will be able to find the cfm at any lift value and always know how much cfm you have at any lift.:)
 
Jun 18, 2008
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Glide Pro
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#15
I asume your still using sealed suction. How can we convert sealed suction weights to cfm and lift numbers using math, or do you have to use gauges?
That is not sealed suction. Sealed suction is where NO air moves. That is suction under dynamic vacuum conditions. It is the most important to know because that is what you get while actually cleaning. I dont advocate using popcycle sticks to get it. You need one of these:


 
Nov 25, 2010
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Brett Schwabenland
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#16
Thanks for posting all that. I run a Recoil 40 ft 2" to a Y, 2 2stage porty in series at Y then 10ft 2" to 3 stage air hog, then 50 ft 2" to rotovac 360. Am I gaining anything more with the 2 2stage porty in series vs another 3 stage air hog? 4 cord vac set up, 1 for rotovac, 3 3 stage vacs and 3 2 stage vacs.
 
Jun 18, 2008
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#17
Thanks for posting all that. I run a Recoil 40 ft 2" to a Y, 2 2stage porty in series at Y then 10ft 2" to 3 stage air hog, then 50 ft 2" to rotovac 360. Am I gaining anything more with the 2 2stage porty in series vs another 3 stage air hog? 4 cord vac set up, 1 for rotovac, 3 3 stage vacs and 3 3stage vacs.
Well it sounds like a powerful combination to me Brett. Only other comment I will make on that is it will be nice when all that much power and more will be contained in a light 130 lb portable running a 2 X 2 system with 4 - 3 stage vacs in a few months time so it can easily be left in a van or rolled into a house. I like my power in a very compact form.:)