Tap Water Carpet Extractor

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Sep 9, 2017
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Nick LeQ
#1
I have heard of a carpet extractor that attaches directly to the tab in a bathroom or kitchen sink. Has anyone else heard of this machine? Any ideas about it?
 

Todd the Cleaner

Todd Cottino
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#2
Is it the Steamin Demon?

 

SAA

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#3
I used them in conjunction with my entire cleaning system. If we do our prep work properly, all any machine becomes is a rinse machine to remove the suspended soils.

Here is a video clip showing this machine in conjunction with proper dry soil removal, soil suspension and then using this to flush out a carpet. This is a high flow extractor and works amazingly well.

If you have any more questions, please ask. I used this machine for 15 years in very high end cleaning situations and the results were great. They are also being used in many, many large commercial applications all over the country.


Hope this helps.

SAA
 
Dec 3, 2012
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#4
I have heard of a carpet extractor that attaches directly to the tab in a bathroom or kitchen sink. Has anyone else heard of this machine? Any ideas about it?
All i can say is avoid it.
 

SAA

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#5
Idaho Maverick,

You ultimately have to be the one to do your own due diligence on anything you may or may not use. Find a dealer that will allow you to demo the unit, talk with those who use it. Shaw Industries promoted this in a big way and used it themselves due to its' large volume of water it produces to flush out the carpet. It is a high volume extractor but it also has the ability to extract that large volume.

It is a simple machine, which is always a nice thing if and when you have to work on it. It is overpriced but it works well. It is light and easy to carry in a small vehicle and operating cost to clean with, are very small, especially when compared to the operating cost of a TM.

Does it work? Quite well. Is it for everyone? No, nothing is, you have to determine what you need and what will give you the results you want or some reasonable compromise you have to decide on.

SAA
 

Todd the Cleaner

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#6
Idaho Maverick,

You ultimately have to be the one to do your own due diligence on anything you may or may not use. Find a dealer that will allow you to demo the unit, talk with those who use it. Shaw Industries promoted this in a big way and used it themselves due to its' large volume of water it produces to flush out the carpet. It is a high volume extractor but it also has the ability to extract that large volume.

It is a simple machine, which is always a nice thing if and when you have to work on it. It is overpriced but it works well. It is light and easy to carry in a small vehicle and operating cost to clean with, are very small, especially when compared to the operating cost of a TM.

Does it work? Quite well. Is it for everyone? No, nothing is, you have to determine what you need and what will give you the results you want or some reasonable compromise you have to decide on.

SAA
I agree, I've considered buying one and probably will some day. I see it being a great tool for area rugs that can't be pit washed.

From what I understand the extraction is excellent since you are getting the full power of the vac motor and not losing vacuum due to running a bunch of hose.

I remember years ago when Ross with his Vortex truckmount went against a guy with a SD and he was impressed at how well th SD performed. Here's the video. There's 2 parts.


 

SAA

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#7
Todd,

I have not seen those videos before, great example, thanks for sharing. I think that shows a lot.

There was a test a few years ago comparing the different tools used for flood work and the SD came in third, which was pretty neat since it is not a flood tool, that is how well the vacuum worked.

They are great for area rug cleaning, I have cleaned a lot of area rugs with it.

SAA
 

ACP

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Apr 9, 2014
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#8
sure anything can rinse but how long does set up and tear down take and how heavy is that thing hauling it around peoples homes, plus what is there perception of value for your company when others pull up in an Aero-Tech?

CFX is another option, its a great machine ive owned one for the last 6-7years. Its constant flow, hooks up to any water source, really light only 35lbs, auto pump out, and doubles as a vac booster if you ever need one.

I can run a splitter from TM and dual wand with CFX, or really long hose runs and have added auto pump out for commercial jobs. They come in 1 vac or 2 vac.
 
Dec 3, 2012
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#9
sure anything can rinse but how long does set up and tear down take and how heavy is that thing hauling it around peoples homes, plus what is there perception of value for your company when others pull up in an Aero-Tech?

CFX is another option, its a great machine ive owned one for the last 6-7years. Its constant flow, hooks up to any water source, really light only 35lbs, auto pump out, and doubles as a vac booster if you ever need one.

I can run a splitter from TM and dual wand with CFX, or really long hose runs and have added auto pump out for commercial jobs. They come in 1 vac or 2 vac.
It is a light weight machine. But has its drawbacks. Too much hassle imo for what it cost. One could get a decent portable for the same price. And be able to do tile with same machine. I had it hated it and got rid of it. Maybe commercial *only* or stationary in a shop setting ok. But house to house no way.
 

SAA

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#10
That is one opinion and one who does not like it, that's ok.

Set up and tear down is a lot easier for me than Truck Mounts. The last 25 years of my cleaning, were in very upscale homes. The last 15 the SD was used and it is so much easier to set up and carry in than a TM. Some of these homes were a long way from the place I could park a truck. Never once did I have anyone question my equipment, no one cares, we seem to care in our industry but the consumer does not care. I consider it as similar to me needing a plumber, if I have a clogged drain, I do not care one little bit what equipment they use, as long as the drain works when I am finished.

Again, Idaho Maverick, you have a lot of information given, some positive some negative. You have to test it out to see.

Maybe this is just a discussion between a few of us here as I have not seen anything from Idaho Maverick on all of this information.

Like many things in life, everyone has an opinion, keeps it interesting.

SAA
 

JDARNOLD

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#11
Didn't Namco, years ago do that where you connected to a sink for the hot water then there was a 100 psi pump in the case.
 

Tater

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Richard Whithers
#13
The Namco beast is a very solid machine and does what you are asking.

SAA, that video shows running a crb, a cimex, and then a SD,.....that seems like overkill and man hours would seem to be very high to do all 3 steps.
 

SAA

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#14
It is not overkill, it is simply following the Standards and Principles of Cleaning.

If one does not understand what each step of the cleaning process is for, it may seem like a lot but in reality, it is much simpler, easier and removes a lot more soil.

As an example: Does anyone know the approximate % of soluble soils a carpet carries? How about the % of insoluble soils? How is each one removed the best and what removes the largest % of these soils? What family of soils causes the most problem for us as cleaners? Do we also understand 'apparent' soiling and how to best deal with it?

These are the things the Standards address and have proven to work with these. If we understand what and why, then we will realize the how and simply do it. That is what is seen in the video.

If anyone who may not understand this has any questions, I would be glad to help answer them. Understanding and performing these will certainly set on apart from the crowd.

SAA
 

Todd the Cleaner

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#15
It is not overkill, it is simply following the Standards and Principles of Cleaning.

If one does not understand what each step of the cleaning process is for, it may seem like a lot but in reality, it is much simpler, easier and removes a lot more soil.

As an example: Does anyone know the approximate % of soluble soils a carpet carries? How about the % of insoluble soils? How is each one removed the best and what removes the largest % of these soils? What family of soils causes the most problem for us as cleaners? Do we also understand 'apparent' soiling and how to best deal with it?

These are the things the Standards address and have proven to work with these. If we understand what and why, then we will realize the how and simply do it. That is what is seen in the video.

If anyone who may not understand this has any questions, I would be glad to help answer them. Understanding and performing these will certainly set on apart from the crowd.

SAA
I read years ago that Proctor & Gamble did a study and found that 78% of the soil in carpet was dry soil removable by vacuuming, another 15% removable by wet cleaning, and 7% unremovable.
 

SAA

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#16
You got the main idea Todd. Now, if we as cleaners would realize what this means, we would be much more effective in our cleaning and let our equipment do the hard work.

This is why those that have started to use their CRBs have discovered what has been known forever (relatively speaking) that removing the dry particulate insoluble soils makes the wet side cleaning so much better and easier.

SAA
 

Ed Cruz

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Aug 1, 2013
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Ed Cruz
#17
I used them in conjunction with my entire cleaning system. If we do our prep work properly, all any machine becomes is a rinse machine to remove the suspended soils.

Here is a video clip showing this machine in conjunction with proper dry soil removal, soil suspension and then using this to flush out a carpet. This is a high flow extractor and works amazingly well.

If you have any more questions, please ask. I used this machine for 15 years in very high end cleaning situations and the results were great. They are also being used in many, many large commercial applications all over the country.


Hope this helps.

SAA
I want one for area rug cleaning at my shop. Looks like a pain at someone's home or business though....
 

ratfool

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Apr 22, 2016
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Marlene Slichter
#18
It is not overkill, it is simply following the Standards and Principles of Cleaning.

If one does not understand what each step of the cleaning process is for, it may seem like a lot but in reality, it is much simpler, easier and removes a lot more soil.

As an example: Does anyone know the approximate % of soluble soils a carpet carries? How about the % of insoluble soils? How is each one removed the best and what removes the largest % of these soils? What family of soils causes the most problem for us as cleaners? Do we also understand 'apparent' soiling and how to best deal with it?

These are the things the Standards address and have proven to work with these. If we understand what and why, then we will realize the how and simply do it. That is what is seen in the video.

If anyone who may not understand this has any questions, I would be glad to help answer them. Understanding and performing these will certainly set on apart from the crowd.

SAA
Where I work the standards were not followed. The issue becomes "does it look clean now, and does it look clean next week?? I see RAPID "re soiling and the carpet just doesn't look right. Not "dirty" (spots and stuff) but no real colors. Shades of gray.
 

Tater

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Richard Whithers
#19
Thanks SAA for the explanation. I have just heard how great the Cimex was on many many post for years on cgd open areas, yet I never thought they would be extracting afterwards....are they? I agree you post describes the absolute best way to clean, but it would be a hard sell, in my experience closing a job when 2 other bids who are just CRBing and then Cimexing. Great info however and thanks!
 

SAA

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#20
Tater,

It is used in many different ways, for me, for most of my career, I extracted after performing all of the cleaning steps, to simply flush out the suspended soils. Many use this for encapsulation work also.

One thing to keep in mind, never worry about your competition, do not try to copy or follow them. Always perform the best you can and it will eventually pay off. I have found through the years a basic truth about doing the best you can: "The Cream Always Rises to the Top!"

Hope things go well for you.

SAA