Suicide and Blood clean-up advise!!

Scott W

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Volume of blood on the porous surfaces like carpet would be a factor in deciding if you should do this job. Carpet that is saturated with blood should be double bagged and disposed of. Same for padding. Small drops of blood can be cleaned and sanitized.

I would suspect with suicide, there may be large volume of blood.

Hard surfaces can be washed and then disinfected with Benefect, Sporicidin or similar. Allow plenty of dwell time for the disinfectant to work.
 

ACP

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never clean that, like Clean thread said... you need to throw that carpet away bagged up

doesnt matter how much you get the stain out, its gross to imagine someone else moving into the "cleaned" carpeted area when we all know there is mass blood still in the backing
 
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sbsscn

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aftermath or crime scenes should not be "cleaned" they are Bio Hazard situations and require proper training, license, and insurance. Don't try to be something you're not. Get some training and be prepared to experience death in a new way. Makes good money just do it the right way.
 

WillnDeb

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As much as I love where I live there is always bad with the good, in this case this state is a "non disclosure" state. They dont have to tell about anything from murders to house fires. Some ,,,,well all of my PM's have sent me to jobs for blood cleanup without telling me and I've since told them to use someone else for any and all blood clean up because they all, to a company refuse to do the right thing and replace it. I absolutely refuse to clean up blood or remains with my equipment.
 

sbsscn

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When I was younger (way before carpet cleaning) I went into a body shop, they had a 2000 (brand new ) Yukon. It looked like it was in a fire...nope!!! A homicide vehicle. The person died due to over 50 rounds entering him. The guy got ambushed while doing a deal. The SUV looked like a hollywood stunt car, the whole driver side looked worst than swiss cheese of the amount of bullet holes. It was so bad the bullets jammed the door shut. You could see inside the melted markings of the bullets rubbing against the plastic trims. Blood everywhere, brain matter with bone and hair scalp dangling on the visor. horrible scene and the odor was unforgettable. I asked the shop owner how do you clean that up? He answered you dont, trauma clean up takes care of it. A few days later I went by there again and sure enough a hazardous clean up crew was there. I asked on of the guys so are you going to clean and disinfect? he said they had to collect the whole interior and dispose of it correctly, They took the whole truck apart ( interior) they wiped and disinfected everything. Every crevice, wire I mean everything. The truck ended up getting a whole brand new interior and went back on the road. The deceased girlfriend kept the truck and drove it like nothing ever happened.
 

Pinosan

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So Cleanthread you advise walking away?
Yes Of course, are you licensed to do crime scene clean up? The carpet was contaminated and the house is being sold. That carpet has to be removed and disposed as hazardous material. can't clean it. Just walk if you don't have the credentials and experience.
 

Scott W

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This may or may not go in this forum but an elderly lady from our church fell in her home last Thursday and hit her head and blood got on the carpet. I have not seen it yet , but wanted to give some good advice on how to clean. Any pointers would be appreciated . thanks.

It comes down to the volume of blood involved. Could be some drops on the surface or enough to saturate the carpet, the pad and the floor underneath. The question can not be properly answered without knowing how extensive the contamination is.

Might require putting on some disposable gloves, extracting with luke warm water and applying some hydrogen peroxide. It might also require replacing all the surfaces that were affected. Most likely something in between those two extremes.
 

Mama Fen

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This may or may not go in this forum but an elderly lady from our church fell in her home last Thursday and hit her head and blood got on the carpet. I have not seen it yet , but wanted to give some good advice on how to clean. Any pointers would be appreciated . thanks.

Scalp wounds can bleed very heavily due to the amount of blood vessels in that area. Without knowing how much blood is involved and where it is (stairs, carpet, walls, contents, hard flooring), it's very hard to say if an inexperienced or untrained cleaner can handle this safely. I'd recommend calling a biohazard-trained professional and asking to shadow the job to see what it's like.
 

BonnetPro

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I have done this for 20 years and stopped counting after 100 events cleaned. You need to make it visually acceptable but also safe for reoccupancy.
A few drops of blood not a big deal. A large caliper gun to the head with a slower death much much different. If the head opened or if the heart stayed beating for a minute or two or more you will have a very large amount of trauma to clean, both tissue and blood. The first day the smell wont be too bad but as time passes the organics break down and brings the odor to severe odor and sometimes the maggots and other bugs. if that description seemed horrible to you ( and it is) you may not like the real thing. If it did not seem to bad then read below.

Some things to consider.

*How will you protect yourself?!
*The cleaning operation
*What will you do with the bloody/soiled items you remove
*How will you dispose of these items in a way that does not break the law and put you at risk?
*How will you remove the odor
*How will you properly clean and disinfect your tools and equipment
*What chems will you use
*How will you know it is safe for others to reoccupy the space cleaned and restored.
*How much will you charge and who?
*In the event you have to deal with someone or family that found the body how will you deal with them and talk about your fee for the job
*How will you guarantee you get paid?

Hope that helps you see some of the broader picture.
 
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