Streaks on floor

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wonderd

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May 19, 2017
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Dan jhghjg
#1
Hello everyone,

I currently run a house cleaning business and I sometimes have customers complain about the streaks left on the floor after cleaning. The cleaning solution is water/vinegar and some dish soap. I have tried the solution myself and it does leave streaks. I have also tried just water and vinegar and was not impressed.

My question is what would be a good/cost affective cleaning solution to use that will do a good job and is streak free? Also it would have to be non-hazardous and safe.

I am a fan of making my own cleaning solutions vs buying 3rd party.

Appreciate any help!
 

Smtwn janitorial

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Sep 21, 2016
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Matt ross
#2
Why would you attempt to make your own solutions? Makes no sense. Other people have spend literally millions of hours in school, in real life, in labs, and in similar working situations as you perfecting chemicals to safely and effectively clean with. Many people are disillusioned about the using chemicals. Just because some can be harmful in certain amounts doesn't mean that the majority of cleaning chems arnt safe and effective. Talk to a chemical distributor in your area. There are chemicals that are gentle enough to wipe any surface down that kill bacteria and viruses that you need to be killing. Your customers will thank you for looking after their health.
 

jtsunbrite

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Sep 4, 2015
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jeff kessler
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#3
Hello everyone,

I currently run a house cleaning business and I sometimes have customers complain about the streaks left on the floor after cleaning. The cleaning solution is water/vinegar and some dish soap. I have tried the solution myself and it does leave streaks. I have also tried just water and vinegar and was not impressed.

My question is what would be a good/cost affective cleaning solution to use that will do a good job and is streak free? Also it would have to be non-hazardous and safe.

I am a fan of making my own cleaning solutions vs buying 3rd party.

Appreciate any help!
go to a janitorial supply and get some neutral floor cleaner
 

Common janitor

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Apr 5, 2014
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Ed Feil
#4
OR go to Sam's Club and buy the Members Mark floor cleaner by Eco Lab .
A whopping $4.98 per gallon and at FOUR CENTS per ounce VERY COST EFFECTIVE .
Neutral , smells great and it's no rinse as well . Been using it on everything from laminate floors to ceramic tile and never a problem . As pointed out above being an "amateur chemist " is not a great idea when you have products available to do a great job .
You're opening yourself up to a liability issue as well not to mention using things " not for their intended purpose " . I've been in both janitorial supply houses within five miles of my house and even Pittsburgh , Pa . and the Eco Lab floor cleaner is still the least expensive I can buy AND by a LARGE MARGIN . Why do you rinse your dishes when hand washing them ?? To remove the film from the dish soap . Guess why you're getting streaking on those floors ?? This could also be a result of using string mops or even looped end mops .
Use microfiber mops and some neutral cleaner and save yourself some headaches .
Chems are 3 -5% of your cost of doing business so you're not " saving " anything if you're getting complaints . As far as being " non hazardous " if memory serves me , the Eco Lab cleaner at dilution has a health rating of 1 . No , you can't drink it , that's reserved for water which is ALSO a " chemical " . JMHO .
All the Best, Ed
 

Ken Raddon

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Jul 22, 2010
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#5
We all make out own chemicals by mixing boosters to existing formulas. But yours are obviously not working. I mean really. You're already buying from a third party. Your just buying the parts i.e. vinegar and dish soap and putting them together so why not buy one that is already assembled for you?

Get the one mentioned by eco labs they make good stuff or get Zep floor cleaner at home depot they make good stuff too.
 

jtsunbrite

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Sep 4, 2015
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jeff kessler
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#7
We all make out own chemicals by mixing boosters to existing formulas. But yours are obviously not working. I mean really. You're already buying from a third party. Your just buying the parts i.e. vinegar and dish soap and putting them together so why not buy one that is already assembled for you?

Get the one mentioned by eco labs they make good stuff or get Zep floor cleaner at home depot they make good stuff too.
eco labs makes some good shit too !
 

dex

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May 6, 2009
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Dwain McDaniel
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#9
you also really do not want the liability of making your own stuff, anyone eats some , slips on some, breaths some, anything and you do not have the multimillion dollar backing of the chemical manufacturer defending their product , you made it so the liabilitiy is yours.
 

wonderd

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May 19, 2017
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Dan jhghjg
#10
Thanks for the help everyone. I have another question. What can be used for the thick black grease that forms on top of stove tops? My mother said the only thing that can be used is spraying oven cleaner on it and letting it sit over night. However when I said one of my employees in to clean a home that option will not work.

While I was in home depot looking at their cleaning products I seen something called
"zep heavy duty citrus degreaser"

Will this work?
 

Smtwn janitorial

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Sep 21, 2016
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Matt ross
#11
A steam machine works the best. There are some residential ones that work fairly well on Amazon for about $200. Look on YouTube for videos of steam cleaning kitchens. Otherwise your local chemical supplier has strong degreasers that are alot stronger than anything made by zep at home Depot.
 

wonderd

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May 19, 2017
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Dan jhghjg
#12
Gotcha. Does anyone know if the Zep I mentioned is stronger than the store bought stove cleaners?
 
Oct 6, 2011
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Charlene Williams
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#13
Thanks for the help everyone. I have another question. What can be used for the thick black grease that forms on top of stove tops? My mother said the only thing that can be used is spraying oven cleaner on it and letting it sit over night. However when I said one of my employees in to clean a home that option will not work.

While I was in home depot looking at their cleaning products I seen something called
"zep heavy duty citrus degreaser"

Will this work?
As far as vinegar on floors, never do it because i can dull wood floors, the finish. I love this stuff http://www.homedepot.com/p/Pledge-1...-Surface-Floor-Cleaner-4-Pack-70736/204236281

I wouldn't leave oven cleaner on top of stove either. It is possible to take the finish off doing that also. This is a great degreaser http://www.homedepot.com/p/ZEP-32-oz-Fast-505-Industrial-Cleaner-and-Degreaser-ZU50532/202671716 and https://www.menards.com/main/housew...429573021-c-7097.htm?tid=-6185052307751246321
 

Mama Fen

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Jul 18, 2012
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Amy Barnes
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#14
Gotcha. Does anyone know if the Zep I mentioned is stronger than the store bought stove cleaners?
DO NOT use oven cleaner on top of stoves unless it's the special type that is designed for that purpose. EVER.

Zep degreaser is butoxyethanol, an alcohol-based degreaser that is also commonly found in oven cleaners. It is also very strong. Care must be taken to rinse thoroughly.

The thing people like about oven cleaner is the thick clingy foam. It stays where you put it rather than running or evaporating off. You can accomplish the same result by using a more lung-friendly degreaser in a foaming sprayer, letting it dwell for a while to penetrate the grease deposit while you do other things, and then coming back to it after the chemical has had time to penetrate.

There's nothing wrong with practicing a little home chemistry for yourself, but if you're offering a professional service to others, it behooves you to use chemicals that are tried, tested, labeled, and backed by internationally-known chemical manufacturers who spent years of research figuring out what to put in the bottle. Our greatest failure in the industry is what I lovingly refer to as Housewife Syndrome - we think we know better than the chemists so we use an extra glug, add things to it, tweak it to make it "stronger"... and we have no idea what we may actually be doing to our health in the process. Believe it or not, professional chemical companies aren't evil money-grubbing corporate bullies.
 

wonderd

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May 19, 2017
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Dan jhghjg
#15
Which one of these degreasers (if any) can I use on kitchen cabinets?


I have a customer requesting that grease gets cleaned off her cabinets, I believe their wood. So I want to satisfy her without ruining them.
 
Jul 10, 2017
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Bill Angelo
#16
Glad that you love the non-hazardous and safe way to take care of your customers. Regular mopping can make your floors clean also it protect them from damage. Dirt on the floor can create scratches that ruin the shine and make them look even dirtier. Streaks are more of a black spot to your floors. We all hate to see that ugly white streaks on the floor, after spending much energy and time to mop your floors. Three simple tricks can get your floor stay away from the streaks:
1) Sweep or even better, vacuum your floor before mopping.
2) The method of mopping is same for every floor, but the cleaners vary depending on the type of the floor. Microfiber mops are a good option. This was something that worked better for my laminated floors when I hired professional post-renovation cleaning services in Oakville. Vinegar and water won't give best results on all floors. So using the right cleaner for your floor is another important step.
You haven’t specified any particular floor type. So am listing out some of the below
  • 1) Ceramic Floor Tiles: 2 tbs. dish soap per gallon
  • 2) Wood Floors: one part vinegar and one part oil
  • 3) Brick / Concrete Floors: mild, neutral floor cleaner
  • 4) Laminate Floors: 2 tbs. of baby soap per gallon of water
3) Use cleaners in the right amount. For example, if you use too much of soap it can leave a residue on all floors and you should be smart about the amount of water that you are using. Too much of water on mopped floor results in increased drying time and streaky deposits. In the case of wooden floor use a soft cloth after you wipe.
Other things to be taken care of being are:
  • Rinse the mop and wring it frequently in the cleaning solution, as soon as the mop’s head begins to look soiled.
  • Change the cleaning solution for fresh if it begins to look dirty.
  • Dry the floor with a clean cloth as soon after mopping.