Starch based glue used for backings | TruckMount Forums #1 Carpet Cleaning Forums

Starch based glue used for backings

rob allen

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Sep 5, 2007
34,808
17,393
113
Va.
www.drynclean.com
Real Name
Robert Allen,Jr.
Business Location
United States
We did a test to try and duplicate browning or wicking spots. We cleaned a polyester remnant cut pile with standard backing. It was pretty soiled in traffic areas and had a few spots. After we cleaned it we allowed it to dry naturally without aid of air conditioning or air movers. There was some brown spots that appeared in traffic and where a couple spots were. At least thats what some call it. Some call it alkaline burn. I'd like to propose another theory.

Looking at the back you could see where it had gotten a few areas of the backing wet where extra prespray was applied on some of the traffic area and spots or where extra cleaning strokes were done. Now then I took a tour of Shaw a year back they said they use glue that if I remember was starch and or clay based. If thats the case, could what we call brown post be due to non absorbency of poly, a little over applying prespray/clean strokes and the backing as the real culprit?
 

Jim Davisson

Well-Known Member
Aug 23, 2016
3,617
4,173
113
Serving the greater Charlotte area
Real Name
James Davisson
Business Location
United States
I have always heard the clay around Dalton Ga was ideal for carpet manufacturers, don't know how much truth there is to it though.

Spots that brown out or wick the worst in my experience typically are the ones that have had a liquid spill that has dried prior to cleaning. Every carpet we clean wicks some soil to the tips, it's just so minute we don't see it. Soil from a spill carried into the backing and pad that has dried can be the problem spots. Overwetting or not flushing the face fibers enough with incomplete dry strokes gives it a clear path to the surface IMO. One clear example of wicking from the primary and secondary backing was always a plant stain from an over watered plant. If you disengaged the carpet you could clearly see the color through the carpet and on the pad. I'm not going to say I think all are caused from the above, but would wager that most are spill based by the shape of the brown out area after cleaning, when dry.
 
  • Like
Reactions: rob allen

Jim Davisson

Well-Known Member
Aug 23, 2016
3,617
4,173
113
Serving the greater Charlotte area
Real Name
James Davisson
Business Location
United States
I should reiterate my previous post by saying, soil already present + just a water spill can cause the above. Especially "where", in the corner of the room, no worries, in a traffic lane which is a high soil area close to the backing... different story. Take it for what it's worth, but brown out wicking is 99% circles and 1% in a line next to a heavy piece of furniture that it couldn't travel under. Never see odd shape wicking problems in my time sucking rugs.
 

Chris Henry

Active Member
Jul 20, 2017
238
205
43
Real Name
Bucky Rogers
If what you are thinking is true Rob, that some type of material used in the manufacturing process causes wicking when something from the cleaning process comes in contact with the backing, I would think not.
It would mean that HWE would have to be relegated as a non-acceptable way to maintain that product.
I thought the CRI approved HWE as the gold standard of maintenance.
 

rob allen

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Sep 5, 2007
34,808
17,393
113
Va.
www.drynclean.com
Real Name
Robert Allen,Jr.
Business Location
United States
If what you are thinking is true Rob, that some type of material used in the manufacturing process causes wicking when something from the cleaning process comes in contact with the backing, I would think not.
It would mean that HWE would have to be relegated as a non-acceptable way to maintain that product.
I thought the CRI approved HWE as the gold standard of maintenance.
CRI rates Rug Dr as a platinum standard.
 
  • Haha
Reactions: Chris Henry

Mama Fen

Well-Known Member
Jul 18, 2012
3,326
3,556
113
Real Name
no name
Business Location
United States
If what you are thinking is true Rob, that some type of material used in the manufacturing process causes wicking when something from the cleaning process comes in contact with the backing, I would think not.
It would mean that HWE would have to be relegated as a non-acceptable way to maintain that product.
I thought the CRI approved HWE as the gold standard of maintenance.
CRI predates a great deal of the technology and chemistry that is currently available, and as such I'm sure some of their information could be called 'outdated'.

That being said, I don't see HWE getting pushed out of the top spot of suggested cleaning methods any time soon. Its benefits long-term still far outweigh its potential drawbacks.