ASTM Shower Cleaning-Acid or Alkaline 1st?

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Apr 20, 2017
22
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Real Name
Robert Borreson
#21
“ASTM” here could stand for an international organization that sets standards for testing materials. It’s commonly used in the IAQ (Indoor Air Quality) world.
 
Jan 10, 2008
46
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Mario
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#23
Vinegar and dawn soap cuts soap scum. I used a drill with a brush to work it in and I hit it with my hand held tile tool. Came out good.
 

Tater

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Jan 14, 2014
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Richard Whithers
#24
ASTM American Society of Testing Materials ---provide standards to many industries.

Relating to flooring installations, they provide info on concrete moisture content limits vs. Material that can adhere.
 

Scott W

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Feb 14, 2006
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#25
ASTM = American Society for Testing and Materials

This is a standards organization for many industries, they designate what their needs to be a standard for, who should write the standard, how it should be written, keep track of all the standards from every industry, etc.

Not sure of its use in this thread.
 

ACP

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Apr 9, 2014
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Bjorn Marshall
#26
our tap water here is less than 60-70 ppm, so acid is rarely if ever needed when cleaning showers.

also you dont need to buy industry specific acid cleaners like Viper, acid magic from ACE hardware ($5/gallon) or many other ones from home depot.... its all the same.
 

Scott W

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Feb 14, 2006
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#27
our tap water here is less than 60-70 ppm, so acid is rarely if ever needed when cleaning showers.

also you dont need to buy industry specific acid cleaners like Viper, acid magic from ACE hardware ($5/gallon) or many other ones from home depot.... its all the same.
I must disagree here. The active ingredients that do the cleaning may be similar. However, industry specific products will include stabilizers for longer shelf life; ingredients to reduce the risk of damage to metals; ingredients that make it safer to use. In some cases buffers may also be present.

95% or 98% the same is not close to being 100% identical. It is the few percent that formulators work hard to tweak and make a cleaning product just a bit better than the competition.
 

ACP

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Apr 9, 2014
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Bjorn Marshall
#28
I must disagree here. The active ingredients that do the cleaning may be similar. However, industry specific products will include stabilizers for longer shelf life; ingredients to reduce the risk of damage to metals; ingredients that make it safer to use. In some cases buffers may also be present.

95% or 98% the same is not close to being 100% identical. It is the few percent that formulators work hard to tweak and make a cleaning product just a bit better than the competition.
I agree with what your saying Scott, but in the field and having done many many showers the store bought acids work very very well and I have never had one damage metal

many of them are specifically for cleaning showers

as far as safety goes, if your using an acid or any product strong enough to clean showers well you should really be wearing a mask.. especially because its in an enclosed space.
 

Tom Forsythe

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Mar 20, 2006
226
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Salt lake City, UT
#30
Saying that all chemicals are the same is like saying all professional cleaners are the same. Performance may be similar in some situations, but there are acids that are safer than other acids. You can buy muriatic acid from the box stores, but it is significantly more dangerous than urea hydrochloride that is used in Viper Renew and Resucitate. I recommend Resucitate over Viper Renew for showers as it has more inhibitors to protect metal fixtures than Viper Renew. This extra 2 to 3% can make a difference between damaging a fixture or not. We still recommend masking off metal fixtures as a standard practice.
 

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