Scotchgard - It is worth it? | TruckMount Forums #1 Carpet Cleaning Forums

Oct 9, 2019
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Hi Guys

We do a lot of carpet cleaning, commercial & domestic. Up to now, we were not quoting for protectors because some bad experience we had few years back (the carpet has reacted and it turned up all pink). But more and more of my customers are looking for protectors. I just want to ask some of you well experienced carpet cleaning specialists:

Do you apply scotchgard on wet or dry?
Do you dilute the product?
Can you wash a carpet few months after the treatment?

Thank you for your help

Carpet Cleaning Dublin
 

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Yes, Yes, Yes
I have attached some product links:
The most direct competitor to Scotchgard.
https://interlinksupply.com/index.php?item_num=CP16GL
Designed for nylon and wool carpet.
Maybe this is good timing this thread came about..

I was going to start a thread just now 6:27pm EST at my kitchen counter regarding how to calculate lineal feet...

Reason is I am now comfortable creating the right dilution of maxim advanced with teflon but the label for Maxim advanced for upholstery is in lineal foot terms. The label says one gallon which is RTU covers 24-28 lineal feet.

Im cleaning these chairs (and no I didn't measure but maybe we can guesstimate closely), wish to protect and need to be sure I am calculating the correct lineal feet for the job as to price correctly.

Would you or someone be willing to help?

Hopefully we all find this relevant to the thread since it supports using protector which I believe is of great value to the customers (and us).

FWIW I am guessing 3-4 square feet of upholstery to clean and protect per chair.


1571178613260.jpeg
 

Tom Forsythe

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The linear foot guidance is an estimate and not dogma. The chairs you are protecting would probably be calculated as 56 linear feet as it is not a typical living room chair with wide arms and fabric to the floor. You do not need to saturate the fabric, but apply an even misting. Using a brush will help distribute more evenly. Practice by protecting your own furniture to get a feel for how much is needed. Experience will be the best teacher.
 

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The linear foot guidance is an estimate and not dogma. The chairs you are protecting would probably be calculated as 56 linear feet as it is not a typical living room chair with wide arms and fabric to the floor. You do not need to saturate the fabric, but apply an even misting. Using a brush will help distribute more evenly. Practice by protecting your own furniture to get a feel for how much is needed. Experience will be the best teacher.
So about 7 lineal feet per chair???

Wow so about 2 gallons of maxim advanced upholstery protector for 8 of these chairs??? Following the label that is.

Maybe as you say if I mist and brush in it would require far less..
 

Jim Davisson

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I'm going to say 64 oz of rtu protectant takes care of those 8 chairs... tops. In a good spray bottle spray a horsehair bristle brush (so it doesn't initially pull away chemical) and rub it on the heal of the spray bottle to work it in, then like with an auto body paint sprayer; spray and move the bottle in one fluid motion to apply protectant super evenly. After you complete the chair, brush it in and then wipe down the arms, legs, etc... solvent base can go on dry, water based should be applied to damp fabric. Over application can cause yellowing. You can drape a towel over arms or other things as a spray shield for less clean up.
 

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I'm going to say 64 oz of rtu protectant takes care of those 8 chairs... tops. In a good spray bottle spray a horsehair bristle brush (so it doesn't initially pull away chemical) and rub it on the heal of the spray bottle to work it in, then like with an auto body paint sprayer; spray and move the bottle in one fluid motion to apply protectant super evenly. After you complete the chair, brush it in and then wipe down the arms, legs, etc... solvent base can go on dry, water based should be applied to damp fabric. Over application can cause yellowing. You can drape a towel over arms or other things as a spray shield for less clean up.
Ok man Im listening...

But I have say the labels must be completely out of whack. Again, Maxim advanced for upholstery says 128 oz (1 gallon) is good for 24-28 lineal feet or 4-5 sofas. None of this is adding up...

Im listening to you and thank you. If your estimate is close I am basically charging them for product use only. Which is wack.

Maybe, the only way to know for sure is through experience applying protector. Which again is whack.
 

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I'm going to say 64 oz of rtu protectant takes care of those 8 chairs... tops. In a good spray bottle spray a horsehair bristle brush (so it doesn't initially pull away chemical) and rub it on the heal of the spray bottle to work it in, then like with an auto body paint sprayer; spray and move the bottle in one fluid motion to apply protectant super evenly. After you complete the chair, brush it in and then wipe down the arms, legs, etc... solvent base can go on dry, water based should be applied to damp fabric. Over application can cause yellowing. You can drape a towel over arms or other things as a spray shield for less clean up.
1571356117048.png
 

mrotto

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I see you posted on another forum so I will copy and paste my reply here

Do you apply the protector over wet or dry carpet?
Read the instructions on the label.
Do you dilute the protector?
Read the instructions on the label
1 coat or 2 coats?
Read the instructions on the label


see the theme here? All protectors are different. Some protectors are made for certain situations.


Ive been in the carpet cleaning business for over 30 years and at one point we did a test. The reason for the test was
-to find out if carpet protectors really work
-to find out which carpet protector works best.


Because if I tell you that they work and to use XYZ brand protector how does that help you? YOU have to be convinced that it works before you can sell it to someone else.


So find a large used piece of old carpet (one where the factory protector has worn off) and clean it. Then section it off with tape and spray each taped off section with different protectors. Remember to mark the areas somehow so at the end you know which protectors were applied where. ALSO do not protect one section of the carpet. Then put the carpet in your shop and walk on it for a month or two.

Vacuum the carpet and compare each section for soil resistance.
Then spill some water on it to compare for water repellancy
Then put a dye prone food object on each section and see how each cleans up with just plain water (Mustard is a good choice)


Then you will find that there will be one area that stands out. (No, I wont tell you which) You will be surprised at what you find out.


Now when you talk to someone you will have the confidence to have the experience with protectors, not just someone on a chat board telling you.


Make sense?
 
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Jim Davisson

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Protectant isn't as big of an upsell as made out to be... your onsite so it's easy, but experience will tell you how much to apply. Does it make sense to protect anything synthetic but nylon imo, no. Would I protect natural fibers 100%. I would use solvent based for natural fibers on any day that ends in y. Take it for what it's worth and use it to your advantage.
 

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Protectant isn't as big of an upsell as made out to be... your onsite so it's easy, but experience will tell you how much to apply. Does it make sense to protect anything synthetic but nylon imo, no. Would I protect natural fibers 100%. I would use solvent based for natural fibers on any day that ends in y. Take it for what it's worth and use it to your advantage.
I know nylon will absorb stains the most so that's the reason to protect nylon.

But with Poly/olefin doesn't it make sense to protect from dry soils as well so carpet wears better and lasts longer? Or is that just BS?
 
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Mar 3, 2019
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John Cartegna
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I see you posted on another forum so I will copy and paste my reply here

Do you apply the protector over wet or dry carpet?
Read the instructions on the label.
Do you dilute the protector?
Read the instructions on the label
1 coat or 2 coats?
Read the instructions on the label


see the theme here? All protectors are different. Some protectors are made for certain situations.


Ive been in the carpet cleaning business for over 30 years and at one point we did a test. The reason for the test was
-to find out if carpet protectors really work
-to find out which carpet protector works best.


Because if I tell you that they work and to use XYZ brand protector how does that help you? YOU have to be convinced that it works before you can sell it to someone else.


So find a large used piece of old carpet (one where the factory protector has worn off) and clean it. Then section it off with tape and spray each taped off section with different protectors. Remember to mark the areas somehow so at the end you know which protectors were applied where. ALSO do not protect one section of the carpet. Then put the carpet in your shop and walk on it for a month or two.

Vacuum the carpet and compare each section for soil resistance.
Then spill some water on it to compare for water repellancy
Then put a dye prone food object on each section and see how each cleans up with just plain water (Mustard is a good choice)


Then you will find that there will be one area that stands out. (No, I wont tell you which) You will be surprised at what you find out.


Now when you talk to someone you will have the confidence to have the experience with protectors, not just someone on a chat board telling you.


Make sense?
Well I gained confidence because I got my hands on a sample kit and applied gatorade to carpet squares untreated, treated with one brand and treated with another. I saw the winner hands down. I am trusting that company/supplier/brand isn't screwing with the tests for sales sake. I am thinking those were some Nylon. carpet squares though.

It would be most thorough of me to do my own tests for dry soil resistance and water repellency as well. I think Ill conduct your suggested experiment using a cheap synthetic 5x8 area rug we have had for a year and a half and put in the garage where we walk everyday and see how it does in a month or two.

I will try and use all the protectors I have in equal sections which I believe are:
-Magic Spell (only solvent protector I have I believe)
-TMF Eco Guard (green option)
-Advanced with Teflon
-Maxim Advanced

I dont think I'll use my Maxim advanced for Upholstery this test FYI.


P.S. Ive read the labels and I still had questions about proper usage. Some labels aren't quite clear and it seems I may not be in the minority by not understanding them.

When I do things I like to be able to do them when I understand what I am doing so I can stand behind what I am doing for people. So I am trying to understand some things here.