Rinse Agent vs Clear water

rob allen

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Sep 5, 2007
38,643
19,928
113
Va.
www.drynclean.com
Real Name
Robert Allen,Jr.
Business Location
United States
Layers of soil or oils (esp those that have permeated fibers like on poly's many times) could use some help to strip away suspended soil and prespray. This leaves less residue and soil. Lastly, if it has an encap like ours does, it prevents wicking and reoccurring spots. Alos hard water areas, the rinse reduces the surface tension allowing increased removal of all the above. Lastly, having the extra brightening and ability to clean where you don't apply (waste) prespray, you reduce costs while providing a better clean than water alone under furniture and areas that did not need prespray.


So the advantage of a good rinse is 4 fold. It softens the water in hard water areas. Two, it gives your cleaning a boost. Three, it naturally brightens carpets. Forth, if it has an encap it keeps the carpet cleaner longer. Our RSF Alk Neutralizing Rinse does all the above. And don't forget in areas that you don't prespray (under furniture and other areas that are not heavily soiled, it works great as a stand alone cleaner. Heck many guys use it as a stand alone cleaner on commercial carpets and residential with low soil levels. So it saves ton time and money). And it only takes 8oz per 5g head pack @2-3gph.

Neutralizing Alkaline Rinse: https://shop.truckmountforums.com/products/rsf-alkaline-rinse
Acidic Rinse: https://shop.truckmountforums.com/products/rsf-acid-rinse

Clear water cannot do all the above.

bb345a50c933e052869bdcd39e574ed5.jpg
 
  • Like
Reactions: Scott W and admin

Robert86

Well-Known Member
Sep 28, 2016
2,658
1,419
113
35
Missoula, MT
Real Name
Robert Phillips
Your acid rinse works wonders.
I always liked the acid rinse when I was going nuclear on a carpet. Bring that 12 ph prespray down a bit. But I used the alkaline the other day and was really happy with it. I wasn't sure it really made a difference but half way through I ran out of water in my porty and refilled, didn't mix the rinse in a bucket before putting it into the tank, and the powders didn't dissolve. Second half of the room didn't clean as easily as the first.
 

Dream Clean

Active Member
Oct 3, 2018
420
216
43
Real Name
Emerson Campbell
At my last job we had a few trucks with a chemical injection system and a few without. The ones that did hardly used them. When I finally got assigned one permanently I used the feed religiously with an encapsulating rinse and immediately my redo calls dropped down to almost zero. I will always buy personal equipment that has a chemical feed, even make one if I need to. Best choice.
 

Tom Forsythe

Well-Known Member
Mar 20, 2006
404
661
93
Salt lake City, UT
It softens the water in hard water areas.

As a formulator I do not want cleaners to use hard water. All powdered rinses (no matter the manufacturer) include ingredients that soften water, but provide other cleaning functions. I put these ingredients in the formula to clean and not soften water.

Salt to soften water costs $.15 per pound while powdered rinses will cost $6.00 per pound. Some parts of the country have water below 3 grains per gallon like Virginia, but other areas like Utah have water around 15 grains per gallon or 5 times the water hardness in Utah. Attached is a link to an article that has a U.S. map showing water hardness levels. It also discusses how much hard water can affect the cleaning ability of your rinse. https://cleanfax.com/carpet-care/water-quality-extraction-rinses/
 
  • Like
Reactions: rob allen and igare

Bob Savage

Well-Known Member
Mar 6, 2007
2,028
1,272
113
Dayton, OH
www.perfection-carpet.com
Real Name
Bob Savage
Business Location
United States
As a formulator I do not want cleaners to use hard water. All powdered rinses (no matter the manufacturer) include ingredients that soften water, but provide other cleaning functions. I put these ingredients in the formula to clean and not soften water.

Salt to soften water costs $.15 per pound while powdered rinses will cost $6.00 per pound. Some parts of the country have water below 3 grains per gallon like Virginia, but other areas like Utah have water around 15 grains per gallon or 5 times the water hardness in Utah. Attached is a link to an article that has a U.S. map showing water hardness levels. It also discusses how much hard water can affect the cleaning ability of your rinse. https://cleanfax.com/carpet-care/water-quality-extraction-rinses/
Both of our TM's have on-board water softeners.

Agree soft water is a boost for us.