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Red dye from rug stained limestone

Strawhat

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Oct 11, 2016
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Micah minshall
Customer's basement flooded and caused orientals to bleed into limestone. Would a poltice work to remove this? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
 

jtsunbrite

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Customer's basement flooded and caused orientals to bleed into limestone. Would a poltice work to remove this? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
try an acid first then id bleach the limestone to rid it of the red..... Red is strong dye but if its in a stone you wont hurt the stone bleaching it....
 

Scott W

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I would disagree about using the acid.

We did a couple similar with an application of StainZone, which contains hydrogen peroxide and surfactants, and then covered with a poultice. I think I show photos of one in my Stone and tile cleaning manual.

If anyone wants a copy of the manual, you can get it free by sending your contact information to slewis@interlinksupply.com and requesting it.
 

Strawhat

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Oct 11, 2016
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Micah minshall
I would disagree about using the acid.

We did a couple similar with an application of StainZone, which contains hydrogen peroxide and surfactants, and then covered with a poultice. I think I show photos of one in my Stone and tile cleaning manual.

If anyone wants a copy of the manual, you can get it free by sending your contact information to slewis@interlinksupply.com and requesting it.
Thanks for the reply Scott. Did you cover it with plastic or was the poltice itself enough?
 

Tom Forsythe

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Mar 20, 2006
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Salt lake City, UT
Warn the customer that the process of removing will likely etch the surface resulting in the need for polishing. Peroxide is 2.5 pH and will etch stone. It will not do it as badly as a normal acidic cleaner but will do some damage.

You could try a sodium percarbonate product like our Boost All. You get the peroxide without the acid (pH 10). Mix it up at a 2 ounces per gallon of hot water. Try in a small spot and let it work for about 20 minutes to see if you can be successful. I would then mop it on from an open bucket.

You could also try Red Zone Ready which is a reducer at a pH around 7. Make sure you thorough rinse the stone to dilute and neutralize any remaining peroxide. You can try in a small area. If it works then you can spray over the entire area.
 

Strawhat

New Member
Oct 11, 2016
14
5
3
37
Real Name
Micah minshall
Warn the customer that the process of removing will likely etch the surface resulting in the need for polishing. Peroxide is 2.5 pH and will etch stone. It will not do it as badly as a normal acidic cleaner but will do some damage.

You could try a sodium percarbonate product like our Boost All. You get the peroxide without the acid (pH 10). Mix it up at a 2 ounces per gallon of hot water. Try in a small spot and let it work for about 20 minutes to see if you can be successful. I would then mop it on from an open bucket.

You could also try Red Zone Ready which is a reducer at a pH around 7. Make sure you thorough rinse the stone to dilute and neutralize any remaining peroxide. You can try in a small area. If it works then you can spray over the entire area.
Thanks for the reply. Should I use an oxidizer or a reducer first? Or does it even matter?
 

Tom Forsythe

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Mar 20, 2006
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Salt lake City, UT
Rug dyes vary from synthetic (reducer first) for mass production to organic (oxidizer first) for village production. Some rugs will have both types. I would start with reducer based on probability (mass production).
 
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Scott W

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Thanks for the reply Scott. Did you cover it with plastic or was the poltice itself enough?
We used that in a dry climate (Utah). If the humidity is low or the spot is where there is air flowing such as in front of an HVAC vent, cover it with some plastic wrap. In many cases that is not necessary.

Tom had the good answer on the reducer or oxidizer. Do you know details about the rug?