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Questions about cleaning pet urine spots

Robert86

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So a UV light will illuminate where pets have urinated. Recent stains may be removed to the point that they no longer show under a UV light but older ones may still be visible even after treating with something like Unchained and sub surface extraction. So then how do you know, going into a repeat clients home a year later, what spots are ones you've previously cleaned and what are new? How do you assure the client that you aren't charging them to clean something that you haven't already cleaned and know you aren't wasting your time clinging something that has already been cleaned?
 

Jim Davisson

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Here's something for you to give a crack at on a pet treatment. Stay 100% on the acid side. Lately we have been using flex ice for the rinse, but also substituted flex ice 1:1 for what ever prespray you would normally use and the other usual suspect boosters. High flow, low pressure and asskickin results is the bottom line so far. I wouldn't say I can ink it as our best topical process to date, but it's gaining ground quick!

Not to shabby on poly's either, but that's another story.
 

Todd the Cleaner

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Here's something for you to give a crack at on a pet treatment. Stay 100% on the acid side. Lately we have been using flex ice for the rinse, but also substituted flex ice 1:1 for what ever prespray you would normally use and the other usual suspect boosters. High flow, low pressure and asskickin results is the bottom line so far. I wouldn't say I can ink it as our best topical process to date, but it's gaining ground quick!

Not to shabby on poly's either, but that's another story.
I’ve been using acid for the last few years. It does a great job on urine. Most of the time the acid is all I need. I use FabSet mixed 24 ounces into a hydroforce sprayer.
 
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mrotto

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yep! I got that tip from Todd awhile back. Works great!

But to answer your question, if the pet is continually going on the carpet, you probably wont know where ALL the affected areas are so you may treat the 5 you found but miss the other 3 which are still going to smell - so as far as the homeowner is concerned, your treatments didnt work.

Especially with odor removal/treatment you have to explain the situation to the customer and get realistic expectations.
 
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Todd the Cleaner

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I like showing the customers what the back side and padding look like as well. I don’t pull the carpet up unless the customer wants me to but I do show them this picture I took one time. The customer doesn’t think about what’s down below.

01B48500-1BD1-4E7A-87E8-20EEDDD3C5B9.jpeg
 

wandwizard

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When the black light fails you and it's not feasible to pull the carpet back you BETTER have a moisture detector handy. I use mine in conjunction with UV and often it is the deciding factor in how I treat the situation. Even if the customer has never treated or cleaned the area sometimes urine simply will not glow under UV, but the smell is their major concern because there is no visible stain even under UV. I've seen this more often than seeing the room light up under UV. You need both or you may have a problem. Recently I did a customer's large family room that I had treated previously. W/o the moisture detector I would've had a tough time telling where to treat. Fortunately at least some of the stains were barely visible under natural light. I was able to be certain some areas where she thought the dog had gone had not been urinated on. The moisture detector allowed me to pinpoint exactly where to treat and where to just clean as normal. Btw, the areas I had treated the last time with enzyme did not set off the moisture detector.

Urine is hygroscopic and attracts moisture out of the air basically FOREVER. It is possible for the urine to completely dry out and not set off a moisture detector, but that is by far the exception, not the rule. IMHO, if you don't use a moisture detector for urine inspection you're not doing your job right or at least the best that it can be done. I've personally seen urine deposits that didn't show under UV and that I knew for certain had been down at least several years, still set off a moisture probe. I honestly think it's feasible for urine to set off a moisture detector on a carpet after decades!
 
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Robert86

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When the black light fails you and it's not feasible to pull the carpet back you BETTER have a moisture detector handy. I use mine in conjunction with UV and often it is the deciding factor in how I treat the situation. Even if the customer has never treated or cleaned the area sometimes urine simply will not glow under UV, but the smell is their major concern because there is no visible stain even under UV. I've seen this more often than seeing the room light up under UV. You need both or you may have a problem. Recently I did a customer's large family room that I had treated previously. W/o the moisture detector I would've had a tough time telling where to treat. Fortunately at least some of the stains were barely visible under natural light. I was able to be certain some areas where she thought the dog had gone had not been urinated on. The moisture detector allowed me to pinpoint exactly where to treat and where to just clean as normal. Btw, the areas I had treated the last time with enzyme did not set off the moisture detector.

Urine is hygroscopic and attracts moisture out of the air basically FOREVER. It is possible for the urine to completely dry out and not set off a moisture detector, but that is by far the exception, not the rule. IMHO, if you don't use a moisture detector for urine inspection you're not doing your job right or at least the best that it can be done. I've personally seen urine deposits that didn't show under UV and that I knew for certain had been down at least several years, still set off a moisture probe. I honestly think it's feasible for urine to set off a moisture detector on a carpet after decades!
Wow, thats great advice, thank you. I'll have to look for a moisture detector. Is there one you recommend or what are some things I should look for in one?
When you use it for this purpose do you locate an area of carpet you know hasn't been peed on so you can say this is what it should read and then show what it reads over a pet stain?
 

wandwizard

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Wow, thats great advice, thank you. I'll have to look for a moisture detector. Is there one you recommend or what are some things I should look for in one?
When you use it for this purpose do you locate an area of carpet you know hasn't been peed on so you can say this is what it should read and then show what it reads over a pet stain?
If it's not obvious where the urine is I get input from the customer. Sometimes they have a good idea of where to start looking. If it's a male dog it's likely around the room, curtain areas, edges of furniture, etc. A female will go just about anywhere in the open areas. If there are obvious stains on the surface I will check them for moisture. Almost all other stains will dry out completely and will not set off moisture detection so you can tell if that stain is urine or not with a moisture reaction. A lot of this is just detective work and using your senses like your smell like @Jim Davisson was talking about.

I keep the stick type Dri Eaz moisture detector as well as a couple of smaller WetChec detectors. I keep one in my invoice case and another with my UV flashlight so I have it handy all the time. You can see them both here. I think I bought all of mine on E-bay.

 
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Robert86

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If it's not obvious where the urine is I get input from the customer. Sometimes they have a good idea of where to start looking. If it's a male dog it's likely around the room, curtain areas, edges of furniture, etc. A female will go just about anywhere in the open areas. If there are obvious stains on the surface I will check them for moisture. Almost all other stains will dry out completely and will not set off moisture detection so you can tell if that stain is urine or not with a moisture reaction. A lot of this is just detective work and using your senses like your smell like @Jim Davisson was talking about.

I keep the stick type Dri Eaz moisture detector as well as a couple of smaller WetChec detectors. I keep one in my invoice case and another with my UV flashlight so I have it handy all the time. You can see them both here. I think I bought all of mine on E-bay.

I just looked those up, actually way more basic than I thought they'd be. I was thinking a $400 - $500 meter. $31 for the WetChec... Not really any good reason to NOT have that.
 

wandwizard

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I just looked those up, actually way more basic than I thought they'd be. I was thinking a $400 - $500 meter. $31 for the WetChec... Not really any good reason to NOT have that.
The Wetchec is handy, but some jobs you really need the longer moisture probe if you have a lot to deal with. If it's just a few spots I'll just grab the Wetchec.
 
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Robert86

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The Wetchec is handy, but some jobs you really need the longer moisture probe if you have a lot to deal with. If it's just a few spots I'll just grab the Wetchec.
I'm starting to scrape the bottom of my budget here though. Wetchec can at least get me going and leaves enough to refill a few more things I'm low on.
 

wandwizard

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I'm starting to scrape the bottom of my budget here though. Wetchec can at least get me going and leaves enough to refill a few more things I'm low on.
If money's tight you might keep an eye on E-bay. Recently, maybe a week or 2 ago, I saw a good as new Drieaz moisture detector exactly like mine for like 80 bucks. Normal price is over 200. I was tempted to buy it just as an extra one. I think I got both my Wetchecs on there for like 40 bucks brand new. Another option for the longer moisture probe stick is the Hydro Shark. Do a search for them. It works just like the Drieaz, but under 150.
 
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Robert86

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If money's tight you might keep an eye on E-bay. Recently, maybe a week or 2 ago, I saw a good as new Drieaz moisture detector exactly like mine for like 80 bucks. Normal price is over 200. I was tempted to buy it just as an extra one. I think I got both my Wetchecs on there for like 40 bucks brand new. Another option for the longer moisture probe stick is the Hydro Shark. Do a search for them. It works just like the Drieaz, but under 150.
I kind of forget about ebay. I'll keep an eye on it