Protector mixing and leftovers

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Hello everyone. As a newcomer to the industry I am starting to think about using and offering protector.

Considering I typically have left over prespray each job that I am not always using again I am wondering if protector can be mixed and kept in a separate (dedicated) pump up sprayer? Obviously, I dislike having to dispose of leftover chems in general and looking to find a remedy as it pertains to protector as well.

Thank everyone in advance if you would like to share your experience and knowledge on the subject.
 

Jim Davisson

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If you use your hydroforce to apply protectant, there is no waste. Here's the tricky part, properly applying for the right ft² around furniture. We have to eyeball that. A couple practice runs in the driveway (with just water in the hydroforce), will help and here's what I mean. For 60 seconds with "your" machine at your desired pressure measure how much is going through the hydroforce in GPM in total. Now do the math on how many ft² you should be covering with protectant in that one minute. Once you know that, measure out that ft² in the driveway and practice applying that amount in 60 seconds evenly to that area. You want to get a consistent sweep and gait so in eyeballed areas you are putting down the right amount by your motion and relying less on eyeballed math. This sounds kinda confusing I know, but hopefully it makes sense.

Prespray is fine for days once mixed, O2 can be added again right before you use it, since it is typically spent in an hour or so after first mixing.
 

Ken Raddon

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Do it the easy way... Use solvent protector. That way you can go from carpet to upholstery and the only thing that changes is your application rate.
Here are two honorable mentions:

https://www.jondon.com/kleenrite-kleenguard-solvent-protector.html

This way you can leave them in the sprayer if you just let off the pressure at the end of each day.

I quit mixing water based protector years ago. But if you want to use water based it can be left in the sprayer but it will dry up and clog the tip quite often and the solvent almost never does.

BTW stop not using left over prespray. It is still good days later. It might not be as good but it is still good. Go here and get some Super Charger. If I had prespray left over from yesterday I would put a cup of this in it and it comes back to life. PS Use less than a cup if you have less than a gallon.
 
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J20770

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Hello everyone. As a newcomer to the industry I am starting to think about using and offering protector.

Considering I typically have left over prespray each job that I am not always using again I am wondering if protector can be mixed and kept in a separate (dedicated) pump up sprayer? Obviously, I dislike having to dispose of leftover chems in general and looking to find a remedy as it pertains to protector as well.

Thank everyone in advance if you would like to share your experience and knowledge on the subject.
You don't need to mix a full batch of prespray for each job. If it's a small job mix less. If you run out before you are done, mix up a little more. With some practice you'll be able to eyeball how much you need. Traffic lanes, heavy soil, filtration lines, stairs and spills always require more treatment than areas not walked on. Some people won't prespray the areas that don't have foot traffic relying on the rinse to do the work. I don't believe that is the right way so I just prespray those areas a little lighter than the rest. To each his own, find out what works for you and do it.
 

J20770

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Prespray is fine for days once mixed, O2 can be added again right before you use it, since it is typically spent in an hour or so after first mixing.
Is that true for Enzyme prespray too? I've heard differing opinions on this. I think the little enzymes swimming around in there would survive a few days as long as they don't get too hot. Although I don't know for sure since I've never taken that chance.
 

Jim Davisson

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Is that true for Enzyme prespray too? I've heard differing opinions on this. I think the little enzymes swimming around in there would survive a few days as long as they don't get too hot. Although I don't know for sure since I've never taken that chance.
If you are mixing it up with hot tap water you are totally fine, no worries. Don't quote me on this, but if I remember correctly you have to use 175°+ temperature water to really affect the enzymes ability to work for you.
 

J20770

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I don't remember the temps either, mainly because the prespray will never be that hot when it reaches the carpet, hot water will never be that temp from a faucet and the HF doesn't like water that hot anyway. If I remember correctly the target temp is somewhere around 100 degrees for best results. I wasn't sure if they would still be active a day or two after sitting in the HF jug.
 
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If you use your hydroforce to apply protectant, there is no waste. Here's the tricky part, properly applying for the right ft² around furniture. We have to eyeball that. A couple practice runs in the driveway (with just water in the hydroforce), will help and here's what I mean. For 60 seconds with "your" machine at your desired pressure measure how much is going through the hydroforce in GPM in total. Now do the math on how many ft² you should be covering with protectant in that one minute. Once you know that, measure out that ft² in the driveway and practice applying that amount in 60 seconds evenly to that area. You want to get a consistent sweep and gait so in eyeballed areas you are putting down the right amount by your motion and relying less on eyeballed math. This sounds kinda confusing I know, but hopefully it makes sense.

Prespray is fine for days once mixed, O2 can be added again right before you use it, since it is typically spent in an hour or so after first mixing.
Ok I think I follow the gist here and will have to work on getting the feel for the area to cover in 60 seconds..

I am also hearing that an inline sprayer might be preferable for protector if you know how to measure it out so you can use all you mix or avoid waste for the most part.

So if it is to be inline I need to think about cleaning the sprayer out after pre spraying so I can mix protector. Or maybe just get a second sprayer container to hook to the hydro force possibly...

Also, on the back of the protector I have (TMF) it suggests a certain psi nozzle and range - I'm wondering one would need to check that as well if they were to go the inline sprayer route?

And you mention with the machine at "your desired pressure". Would I adjust the pressure at my pump for protector?

Appreciate your help. Thank you.
 
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Mar 3, 2019
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John Cartegna
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Do it the easy way... Use solvent protector. That way you can go from carpet to upholstery and the only thing that changes is your application rate.
Here are two honorable mentions:

https://www.jondon.com/kleenrite-kleenguard-solvent-protector.html

This way you can leave them in the sprayer if you just let off the pressure at the end of each day.

I quit mixing water based protector years ago. But if you want to use water based it can be left in the sprayer but it will dry up and clog the tip quite often and the solvent almost never does.

BTW stop not using left over prespray. It is still good days later. It might not be as good but it is still good. Go here and get some Super Charger. If I had prespray left over from yesterday I would put a cup of this in it and it comes back to life. PS Use less than a cup if you have less than a gallon.
So would you just pour the solvent protector in your sprayer and go at it? And if there is leftover you can just leave it in there for next time? If this were true I could see having a dedicated sprayer for protetector. It does seem easier this way if I could confirm those details.
 

J20770

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The HF sprayer is calibrated at 400psi. However it draws more at lower pressures so you can change the dilution ration by changing or removing the orifice if you use lower pressures.

The nice thing about a HF sprayer is that you really don't have to mix anything for protector if you are already set to 4 to 1 dilution. Just attach the jug to the sprayer and go. When you are done, remove the jug, flush the sprayer with clean water and put it away.
 

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mrotto

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solvent protector is they way to go for another reason. Take the time to do a test.

Take old carpet (where the factory protector is well worn off) and clean it. Then section it off into areas with tape. Apply different protectors to each area. Let the carpet sit in your show for a month or so. Test each area for water repellency. Then clean and see which area comes clean the easiest. Which area is cleaner using the same cleaning procedures.

Hands down you will find that a solvent protector will be the winner.
 

Scott W

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Dispelling a few myths and wrong ideas about protectors -

Different protectors have advantages for different types of fibers. For example, nylon and wool really need dye blockers due to the type of dye sites in the fiber. They are most easily stained by food coloring and dyes such as Kool-Aid, Gatorade and such. (Maxim Advanced has the most dye blockers.) Olefin, polyester and triexta hold oils easily. They need a protector that has excellent resistance to oils (Advanced with Teflon is #1 by far).

Upholstery is more subject to oils than carpet since upholstery gets body oils and oils from various hair and skin products. There are good protectors for upholstery.

If testing protectors, be sure to test against all the possible issues, water-based spills like coffee and tea, oily spills, dry soils and spills from food and beverage that contain dyes and artificial coloring.

Solvent based protectors tend to dry quicker than water-based protectors. They get dry before they soak into the fiber or travel down to the base of the carpet tuft. Since the solvent dry nears the surface, it protects the tips of the fibers very well at first. Bit, does not protect the bottom portion of the tufts as well. Over time, the protection on the tips will wear off and both solvent and water carried protectors will offer about the same level of protection.

Solvent based protectors release VOCS which are bad for breathing, bad for the environment. They require more ventilation. Solvents can create health and safety issues.
 

Scott W

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When protectors dry and cure, they form a polymer coating on a surface. Great on the carpet or on upholstery fabric. But that thin coating can clog up small sprayer tips. Water carried protectors dry slower than solvents and can form a thicker polymer than solvent carried protectors when left in a sprayer. But, both can clog things up.

Do rinse a sprayer out with hot water after using a protector.

One on-line (Hydro-Force type) sprayer can have many jugs. No need to purchase a new sprayer to have a dedicated protector jug. Just buy extra jugs. Mark them for various presprays and protectors, deodorizers and whatever else you spray.