Polypropylene Squares Garage Floor? | TruckMount Forums #1 Carpet Cleaning Forums

Polypropylene Squares Garage Floor?

ronman

Well-Known Member
Jan 18, 2011
3,836
504
113
Real Name
Ron
Business Location
United States
I've got a client who called, says she has polypropylene squares on her garage floor.
4-5 yrs old, grey color, she can't get them clean, oil and dirt.

I'm planning to go see it, then I'll have pics, but in the meantime, any suggestions on how to clean something like this?
 

Bill Yeadon

Preferred Vendor
Aug 29, 2008
1,756
646
113
70
Indianapolis IN
www.jondon.com
Real Name
Bill Yeadon
I am guessing these will be very crushed and the oil will be binding the dirt to the tile. I would be using an Olefin Preconditioner (Matrix) mixed with your favorite oxidizer and a 175 or CRB to agitate then flush the heck out of them. Remember if the tiles have a non permeable backing wicking will be an issue. You may need to spray an encap on and bonnet following your extraction and use air movers.

Love to see the pics.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ronman

ronman

Well-Known Member
Jan 18, 2011
3,836
504
113
Real Name
Ron
Business Location
United States
Is it carpet tiles or the hard/rigid plastic snap together flooring?
Good question!

I was assuming a vinyl tile type flooring, but maybe it's a carpet type thing.

I'll post more after I look at it and take pics.
Better still, I'll call her tomorrow, and ask her before I go over to look at it.
 

ronman

Well-Known Member
Jan 18, 2011
3,836
504
113
Real Name
Ron
Business Location
United States
I spoke with the customer today, he clarified that this is a tile, not a carpet type material, smooth, but it has grooves cut into it for traction, about 1/16" deep.
He claims to be a chemist by trade, and says no chemical will harm this material.
He has used super strong chemicals and mineral spirits with no problem.
He feels it needs to be scrubbed with some kind of rotary in order to get it clean, I suspect the grooves are holding grease, oil and grime.
I'm meeting him today to look at it, take pics etc, then I'll give him a quote.
I'm thinking either the cimex or the 175, but I'm leaning toward the cimex because the bristles are a little softer, and I think it would get down into the grooves better.
They are not glued to the concrete, they are put down as interlocking free floating tiles is how he described them to me.
Any one encountered anything like this?
 

Bill Yeadon

Preferred Vendor
Aug 29, 2008
1,756
646
113
70
Indianapolis IN
www.jondon.com
Real Name
Bill Yeadon
Ron,
I agree with the choice of a Cimex. If they are polypropylene then they will hold onto the grease and oil, but it is an inert material so no chemical even battery acid will not damage it. The hard part will be extracting the grooves. I would pressure wash after scrubbing then use airmovers to blow the grooves dry.
 

ronman

Well-Known Member
Jan 18, 2011
3,836
504
113
Real Name
Ron
Business Location
United States
Ron,
I agree with the choice of a Cimex. If they are polypropylene then they will hold onto the grease and oil, but it is an inert material so no chemical even battery acid will not damage it. The hard part will be extracting the grooves. I would pressure wash after scrubbing then use airmovers to blow the grooves dry.
Thanks Bill, I have a 1700 psi PW, do you think that will suffice?
Ironically, this job came to me via a buddy who does PW, but he and the customer felt it needed scrubbed.
Probably any good all purpose degreaser would work, I'm thinking dollar tree Awesome, I've used it around the house and it turns my hands into potato chips, something none of my tile or carpet cleaners do.
I know it's got oil drips from the cars.
 

Scott W

Preferred Vendor
Premium VIP
Feb 14, 2006
16,322
6,891
113
67
West Jordan, UT
www.interlinksupply.com
I am guessing these will be very crushed and the oil will be binding the dirt to the tile. I would be using an Olefin Preconditioner (Matrix) mixed with your favorite oxidizer and a 175 or CRB to agitate then flush the heck out of them. Remember if the tiles have a non permeable backing wicking will be an issue. You may need to spray an encap on and bonnet following your extraction and use air movers.

Love to see the pics.
Bill and I agree on everything except the brand name. I would prespray using Flex with Citrus Solv or Traffic Slam. Olefin loves oil. Use all the heat you can get.
 

ronman

Well-Known Member
Jan 18, 2011
3,836
504
113
Real Name
Ron
Business Location
United States
Bill and I agree on everything except the brand name. I would prespray using Flex with Citrus Solv or Traffic Slam. Olefin loves oil. Use all the heat you can get.
I have Flex/citrus, but not much heat.
I've been looking for a new gas control valve for my little giant 3G.
Someone said Home Depot carried Hot Water Tank controls, but not in my area.
 

Scott W

Preferred Vendor
Premium VIP
Feb 14, 2006
16,322
6,891
113
67
West Jordan, UT
www.interlinksupply.com
I have Flex/citrus, but not much heat.
I've been looking for a new gas control valve for my little giant 3G.
Someone said Home Depot carried Hot Water Tank controls, but not in my area.
Interlink has the parts for Little Giant heaters. Some distributors keep them in stock, others don't. You can oorder by phone (800 660-5803) or on-line http://interlinksupply.com/index.php?item_num=PLI1
 
  • Like
Reactions: ronman

BESJohn

Active Member
Dec 5, 2011
376
57
28
South Carolina
Real Name
John Pence, Jr.
Business Location
United States
If the tiles lock together, be careful about getting water underneath them. It will never dry out, and it will begin to stink. I took out a floor in a hair salon that had paint and drywall dust caked in. It was disgusting underneath, between the hair and dirty feet/urine odor, my helper was about gagging. We took the tiles outside and power washed them, dried and re-installed.

Your situation is a little different with them needing scrubbed. Just food for thought.
 

ronman

Well-Known Member
Jan 18, 2011
3,836
504
113
Real Name
Ron
Business Location
United States
If the tiles lock together, be careful about getting water underneath them. It will never dry out, and it will begin to stink. I took out a floor in a hair salon that had paint and drywall dust caked in. It was disgusting underneath, between the hair and dirty feet/urine odor, my helper was about gagging. We took the tiles outside and power washed them, dried and re-installed.

Your situation is a little different with them needing scrubbed. Just food for thought.
I raised that issue with the customer, and he feels that the concrete will absorb the moisture over time.
Anyway, a picture is worth a thousand words.
So here's 2000.


garage floor polyprolyne 002.JPG
garage floor polyprolyne 003.JPG
 

ronman

Well-Known Member
Jan 18, 2011
3,836
504
113
Real Name
Ron
Business Location
United States
I'm proposing a good scrubbing with the cimex brushes, then rinse with either pw or hose.
Blow it off with leaf blower, then snails.
Collect $200 go home.
 

Kevin Dumas

Well-Known Member
Aug 31, 2008
3,173
755
113
Binghamton, NY
Real Name
Kevin Dumas
Personally I would scrub it with some Greased Lightning or Purple power.

I would rinse it with a truck mount and tile tool instead of a pressure washer.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ronman

ronman

Well-Known Member
Jan 18, 2011
3,836
504
113
Real Name
Ron
Business Location
United States
Personally I would scrub it with some Greased Lightning or Purple power.

I would rinse it with a truck mount and tile tool instead of a pressure washer.
Not if you didn't have a tm. haha
I use my pw for tile cleaning, I could use my tile wand and porty w pumpout, but it would be easier to just blow it all out the front door.
 

BESJohn

Active Member
Dec 5, 2011
376
57
28
South Carolina
Real Name
John Pence, Jr.
Business Location
United States
That is a cool looking floor.
And since the owner seems to know everything about moisture vapor transmission, he can deal with the stink in a few months.
 

ronman

Well-Known Member
Jan 18, 2011
3,836
504
113
Real Name
Ron
Business Location
United States
That is a cool looking floor.
And since the owner seems to know everything about moisture vapor transmission, he can deal with the stink in a few months.
It may be ok, remember, this is a couple of retiree's who only use the garage to park the cars and store stuff.
There won't be any organic material like hair to decompose, nor will there be an ongoing source of water, as I suspect your beauty parlor experience, maybe from mopping, spills etc.