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Patching on poly carpet !

Anderson

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i have heard there is a new heat penetrating tool....
that will heat a typ of seam through the carpet.....

but you seem to have figgered that out with a wet towel.....
 

jtsunbrite

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i have heard there is a new heat penetrating tool....
that will heat a typ of seam through the carpet.....

but you seem to have figgered that out with a wet towel.....
there is a microwave thing but its 500 bucks, I cant bring myself to spend that much on a heating tool to seam a repair... or patch...
 

OldCarpetVet

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there is a microwave thing but its 500 bucks, I cant bring myself to spend that much on a heating tool to seam a repair... or patch...
Yeah, I agree. That's way too much. Especially considering you can buy a steam iron at Walmart for $30.00
 

Pink's of Colorado

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Not picking on you and no judgement, just a question.......

I personally use a straight edge on patches to "square" my cuts, make the edges nice and smooth, and get an almost perfect match.

Do you ever have issues with the plug not fitting properly when you cut without one? I used to have issues when I first started repairing carpet and found it easier and got better results with a straight edge. Just the way I do things though, no judgements. Just curious.
 

jtsunbrite

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Not picking on you and no judgement, just a question.......

I personally use a straight edge on patches to "square" my cuts, make the edges nice and smooth, and get an almost perfect match.

Do you ever have issues with the plug not fitting properly when you cut without one? I used to have issues when I first started repairing carpet and found it easier and got better results with a straight edge. Just the way I do things though, no judgements. Just curious.
Excellent questions, First I have been doing this for 40 years, I used to use the straight edge squares to cut my patches, sometimes they make great patches sometimes they suck at making patches
Look at all of my pics again.. the 6
83392
th pic is the cut out from the carpet , I used a carpet knife to bevel the cut to the inside. So when you look at my empty cut out area all of the fibers of the carpet are point out into the center of the hole,,, now look back at the cutout , you will see the edge that is carpet less that's the edge I will trace with the donor carpet...

the 7th,8th, and 9th pics are where I am trimming and making the patch perfect before I steam it in
83393
83394
83395




so the 10 pics to the end I steamed in the patch so it completely hid the patch.. when I was done and walked away you couldn't find that patch unless I told you where it was..
83396
83397
83398
83399
83400

When I got done you couldn't see it even after I cleaned the carpets.
 

jtsunbrite

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Do you ever have issues with the plug not fitting properly when you cut without one? I used to have issues when I first started repairing carpet and found it easier and got better results with a straight edge. Just the way I do things though, no judgements. Just curious.
I never have any issues with the plug not fitting because if you bevel the cut on the inside of the patch and then you trace that with a cushion back cutter, it will be amost a tiny bit too big to put back in place so you have to slightly trim it and you trim it to perfection because its hard to mess up at that point...

1- use a brand new blade every time
2- cut at a bevel
3-plan your cut and cut each side in a quick clean cut
4-trim off excess
5 round cuts or football shaped cuts hide very very well , plus the trimming is right in the best place possible for perfect trims every time..
6- the cookie cutters and the box square cutters are crap they most of the time don't make a perfect patch..
7- your suppose to make your patches disappear so no one sees them.

Patches take practice , the more patches you make the better your patches will come out... In my career I bet ive done over 10k patches,, I made 3 patches today. I hunt patches out because to me carpet repairs are free money, just like scotch guard ,,, I like free money
 

OldCarpetVet

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Excellent questions, First I have been doing this for 40 years, I used to use the straight edge squares to cut my patches, sometimes they make great patches sometimes they suck at making patches
Look at all of my pics again.. the 6View attachment 83392th pic is the cut out from the carpet , I used a carpet knife to bevel the cut to the inside. So when you look at my empty cut out area all of the fibers of the carpet are point out into the center of the hole,,, now look back at the cutout , you will see the edge that is carpet less that's the edge I will trace with the donor carpet...

the 7th,8th, and 9th pics are where I am trimming and making the patch perfect before I steam it in
View attachment 83393View attachment 83394View attachment 83395



so the 10 pics to the end I steamed in the patch so it completely hid the patch.. when I was done and walked away you couldn't find that patch unless I told you where it was..
View attachment 83396View attachment 83397View attachment 83398View attachment 83399View attachment 83400
When I got done you couldn't see it even after I cleaned the carpets.
Jeff, I angle cut the same exact way. That's how I get a perfectly tight and butted seam. Great job my friend.
 
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jtsunbrite

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Jeff, I angle cut the same exact way. That's how I get a perfectly tight and butted seam. Great job my friend.
best part is we all learned it naturally and on our own... I redid my first patch like 7 times before I got it right and each time I did a patch was a learning experience... Eventually you figure out that beveling the cut puts more fibers on top of each other and that's a good thing.
 
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Jim Davisson

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Cleaning up in the shop a couple weeks ago and I came across this relic. I made a pile of loot with this joker back in the day super fast in rentals. Taking the donor piece out to the sidewalk to wear it in and hit the aluminum threshold on the way back in to add some traffic lane grey... Presto!
83434


Cutting seams, squares or rectangles I usually use a dull Carpenters pencil to split the pile dead straight and cut between the rows with a cushion back cutter if it's large and in a prominent area. For small ones I free hand like everyone else.
 

keep it clean

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Cleaning up in the shop a couple weeks ago and I came across this relic. I made a pile of loot with this joker back in the day super fast in rentals. Taking the donor piece out to the sidewalk to wear it in and hit the aluminum threshold on the way back in to add some traffic lane grey... Presto!
View attachment 83434

Cutting seams, squares or rectangles I usually use a dull Carpenters pencil to split the pile dead straight and cut between the rows with a cushion back cutter if it's large and in a prominent area. For small ones I free hand like everyone else.
Lol look at that thing. Definitely a relic. But is built to last.
Thats what i do. I attempt to split rows useing anything in my tool box flat screw drivers to a nail set. Gives you 2 straight lines at least. Probably not cross grain but worth a try. I made my own row finder from a screwdriver. I smashed the plastic handle off a flat screw driver. Then ground handle end to a dull spike. Then polished so its smooth (grabs less). Flat for loop spike for cut pile. Then i use a top cutter i modified a little bit. The cushion back cutters we have now changed. They dont stay in row as well as the old model did. The new one will not stay in groove or it cuts fibers on half.
 

Jim Davisson

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Lol look at that thing. Definitely a relic. But is built to last.
Thats what i do. I attempt to split rows useing anything in my tool box flat screw drivers to a nail set. Gives you 2 straight lines at least. Probably not cross grain but worth a try. I made my own row finder from a screwdriver. I smashed the plastic handle off a flat screw driver. Then ground handle end to a dull spike. Then polished so its smooth (grabs less). Flat for loop spike for cut pile. Then i use a top cutter i modified a little bit. The cushion back cutters we have now changed. They dont stay in row as well as the old model did. The new one will not stay in groove or it cuts fibers on half.
I had the 3' extension bar for it but "it gone". I hope I never lose this ancient crain 301, it stays straight in the gulley pretty good.
83440
 
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