Oil stain off of concrete

Robert86

Well-Known Member
Sep 28, 2016
2,658
1,419
113
35
Missoula, MT
Real Name
Robert Phillips
You can also bleach it. Whatever you do though, the spot will likely be lighter than the rest of the floor when you're done so if the customer wants a uniform shade you might end up doing it to the entire floor.

Peroxide and bleach might have to sit for a few hours or even overnight. I'd wet the area, then cover with plastic and tape down the edges so it stays wet. Or soak a towel in the chemical and set over the spot, still cover with plastic.
 

Bob the floor guy

Active Member
Jan 6, 2014
160
39
28
saint marys, pa
Real Name
robert perlick
00a571f35e9efcbe1c18d6773fb99971.jpg
 
  • Like
Reactions: OldCarpetVet

keep it clean

Premium VIP
Dec 3, 2012
13,083
7,620
113
Pa
Real Name
Nick
Business Location
United States
Check with your instructions on your epoxy. Be sure you dont need to prime trouble areas first. Any necessary prep that needs to be done best do what you can now. Dont want it to bite you later. I helped a painter epoxy a hallway. And that bich bubbled. I mean not little blisters but bubbles like 2” high and 4’ around. He went back and patched those areas.

Another guy i watched epoxy a old machine shop floor. And we just moved all the cnc mill machines out. We dumped cutting fluid, oil, i killed a forklift in middle of floor hydraulic fluid everywhere. He cleaned it up best he could. Then shot blasted the floor. Its been 5 or so years and epoxy is still there. No peeling. Its a autobody paint booth now.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Bob the floor guy

MikeGaure

... ... ... ...
Premium VIP
Nov 23, 2015
8,106
4,473
113
Real Name
Mike
measure twice cut once. man ive learned some lessons lol

Check with your instructions on your epoxy. Be sure you dont need to prime trouble areas first. Any necessary prep that needs to be done best do what you can now. Dont want it to bite you later. I helped a painter epoxy a hallway. And that bich bubbled. I mean not little blisters but bubbles like 2” high and 4’ around. He went back and patched those areas.

Another guy i watched epoxy a old machine shop floor. And we just moved all the cnc mill machines out. We dumped cutting fluid, oil, i killed a forklift in middle of floor hydraulic fluid everywhere. He cleaned it up best he could. Then shot blasted the floor. Its been 5 or so years and epoxy is still there. No peeling. Its a autobody paint booth now.
 

Adam Valencia

Active Member
Dec 23, 2016
113
28
28
Real Name
Adam V.
Doing 47,000 sqft post construction clean and this spot is where I’m putting down an epoxy. Just want to make sure it sticks.

You can floor grind the concrete making it porous so that it will adhere better. Did you moisture test first. Also the corners and edges are usually the trouble areas of concern. Make sure you lightly angle grind them for best adhesion. I use to do epoxy floor coatings myself.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Bob the floor guy

Adam Valencia

Active Member
Dec 23, 2016
113
28
28
Real Name
Adam V.
Thanks for the info

Muriatic Acid works great for large areas also, but has to be diluted with water while applying it. one man spraying the other with a hose another with a brush broom and contained really well. then squeegy, vacuum, let sit and dry completely over 24hrs. The acid will etch about 100th of a sixteenth of concrete leaving it ready for adhesion. Fill all cracks with car bondo.
 

Bob the floor guy

Active Member
Jan 6, 2014
160
39
28
saint marys, pa
Real Name
robert perlick
Thanks for the info

Muriatic Acid works great for large areas also, but has to be diluted with water while applying it. one man spraying the other with a hose another with a brush broom and contained really well. then squeegy, vacuum, let sit and dry completely over 24hrs. The acid will etch about 100th of a sixteenth of concrete leaving it ready for adhesion. Fill all cracks with car bondo.

This is how we are going to do it. I’ll take some pics when we do. Doing a 30 by 80 area. On that 3 by 3 area we used dawn dish soap. Worked just fine for what they want.
 

Adam Valencia

Active Member
Dec 23, 2016
113
28
28
Real Name
Adam V.
Be sure to moisture test the concrete first. All concrete holds moisture. If its letting out larger amounts of moisture for that particular location, make sure they sign on invoice acknowledging that they understand this and that it will surly limit the warranted that you choose to offer them. It will create bubbling on the epoxy and you will be getting recurring phone calls to come fix it. lol.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Bob the floor guy

Bob the floor guy

Active Member
Jan 6, 2014
160
39
28
saint marys, pa
Real Name
robert perlick
Be sure to moisture test the concrete first. All concrete holds moisture. If its letting out larger amounts of moisture for that particular location, make sure they sign on invoice acknowledging that they understand this and that it will surly limit the warranted that you choose to offer them. It will create bubbling on the epoxy and you will be getting recurring phone calls to come fix it. lol.

Thank you for the info. It’s an old building, 60’s or 70’s. Been a grocery store up until a few years ago. Changing it into a new Chrysler dealership. Tile has been removed since last spring. So doubt I’ll have much problems with moisture, plus it me and the general contractor who are doing it together with him as the lead so no worries on my part. :)
 

keep it clean

Premium VIP
Dec 3, 2012
13,083
7,620
113
Pa
Real Name
Nick
Business Location
United States
Be sure to moisture test the concrete first. All concrete holds moisture. If its letting out larger amounts of moisture for that particular location, make sure they sign on invoice acknowledging that they understand this and that it will surly limit the warranted that you choose to offer them. It will create bubbling on the epoxy and you will be getting recurring phone calls to come fix it. lol.

Thank you for the info. It’s an old building, 60’s or 70’s. Been a grocery store up until a few years ago. Changing it into a new Chrysler dealership. Tile has been removed since last spring. So doubt I’ll have much problems with moisture, plus it me and the general contractor who are doing it together with him as the lead so no worries on my part. :)

60’s and 70’s means no moisture barrier under pad. Test is simple.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Bob the floor guy