Need help cleaning ambulances!

rob allen

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It’s a fleet of 11 emergency ambulances 22 captain chairs up front driver and passenger seats. Three box truck style with the diamond plated flooring all eight other vans have vinyl or linoleum flooring. Two sprinter style Dodge vans and six cargo style vans. And right now they take them to the car wash and power washed the back area out they want the high temperature in steam to sanitize the flooring especially in the rear.


My question is this a bio job? How would you proceed?
 

Dafloorman

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Do you have a steamer? A large high power one that puts out a ton of steam. Then afterwards I would wipe it all down with a very good sanitizer (Hilliard). Charge good and wear mask/gloves.
 
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Anderson

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Yeah
You have a diesel heat pressure washer...
Use that.........
On a tilted driveway
Upholstery...vinyl or cloth seats????

Sanitize with odorcide. And or
Anti microbials......
Use fans.......ur good
Better get price agreed first.....
 
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rob allen

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Thanks everyone. Do we need any bio certs or similar?
 

Dream Clean

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If you want to charge like a bio job I would treat it like a bio job. High temp water but use something like a tile wand or spinner. Don't let all the established "bio waste" just spill out into a parking lot. Then wipe everything down with a good sanitizer when you're finished. The seats I would probably mix a sanitizing cleaner in with my prespray and then sanitize again after extraction just because of all the things cloth seats can hold in them.
 
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TLC CARPET CLEANING

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Hi Rob, Amdecon cert. would be good place to start. Alot of info and credibility tide to the schooling and cert. Our local paramedics were glad to find out we could do that kind of work when they have a bio cleanup job. The company I now work for, the owner is certified in bio hazard cleanup. (Made me an offer I couldn't pass up).

Ambulance cleaning in the patient area would fall into that category I would think.
 
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Mama Fen

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Ambulance drivers and EMTs have a slew of vaccines and other protections against disease or infection because it's their job to ride around in these vehicles all day and get exposed to all manner of cooties. They also have hundreds of hours of training on how to safely handle potential pathogens.

They are mindful at all times of what their hands, elbows, knees, and feet are doing, as well as where any sharp objects, wet spills, or other hazards may be.

They deal with "hot" stuff all day and are subconsciously moving down a mental checklist nonstop with the understanding that a single needle-stick can be a death sentence.

You as a cleaner do not.

Treat this as a serious biohazard, get proper training in PPE, arm yourself with every possible vaccine, and cover yourself with paperwork and waivers to prevent liability issues. Hike your awareness level up about 200%.

Quats are not good disinfectants when gross soiling is involved, so I would look into using phenolics, thymol, peroxides, or even chlorine dioxide for this situation. Remember also to read ANY antimicrobial directions carefully, as many require dwell times of ten minutes or more, and are only effective on a clean dry hard surface.

Remember - you only need to be wrong or slip up once.
 

Scott W

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I don't know of any location where certification is a legal requirement. But, I would still have any employee doing this work certified. American Bio-Hazard and IICRC have trauma scene certifications.

The IICRC certification class is 2 days. But, some training centers offer a third day of hands-on real life type training. I think that has great value, but only a few places offer that third day.
 

floorclean

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I’ve cleaned morgues and ambulance bases for years. What mama Fen is saying is true as far as procedures and chemicals go. We’ve used a mix of quats and phenolics depending on what we are dealing with. The only exception would be in the laziness of people with medical training. They tend to leave infected materials for someone else to deal with and used needles without caps on them. So be very careful never place your hands somewhere you can not see. IE under the seats, stretchers, shelf’s above your head. Consider everything you touch to have medical bio hazard material infection.