Nasty

ccclean

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ccclean

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Stephen Boisvert
So I know this is going to wick. It was Olefin Berber with blood and feces all way down in the backing. I flushed heavily and used 2 fans to dry but it’s still going to wick.
What would you guys do?
 

Mama Fen

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I assume you're taking proper precautions then, to prevent getting any sort of infectious materials on your clothes or on your person, and that you're sanitizing your equipment.

Speed-drying and cotton bonneting are your best defenses against wickback, with a clear explanation to the customer that it will likely happen due to the density of blood. Using a peroxide solution with the bonnet will help. Any red blushes that remain can be treated with rust remover.
 

rob allen

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MikeGaure

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ccclean

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Mama is right and especially about PPE. I would post spray this on and bonnet or rake in...



https://shop.truckmountforums.com/p...odor-remover-with-ecocide?variant=25058289168

I wore a mask and gloves and avoided contact with my equipment for the most part. It was nasty for sure though.

Most of my work in the winter is emergencies like this. I’ve dealt with a lot of blood, mostly old people who’ve fallen. It seems to always wick. Knowing it’s from the density off the blood as Mamafen said is useful info.
 

Mama Fen

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I wore a mask and gloves and avoided contact with my equipment for the most part. It was nasty for sure though.

Most of my work in the winter is emergencies like this. I’ve dealt with a lot of blood, mostly old people who’ve fallen. It seems to always wick. Knowing it’s from the density off the blood as Mamafen said is useful info.
Anyone who knows me knows I'm rabid about safety when it comes to biohazard cleanup. You'll just have to forgive me for caring about you boys. :shy:

Allow me to warn you that even dried blood (which is reconstituted when you mix it with warm water) carries pathogens. Certain viruses can survive in a desiccated state for months, years, even decades. Like seeds in a desert, they wait for moisture and when it comes they reactivate.

Treat dried blood as you would fresh blood - as a potentially lethal substance. Any hoses, waste tanks, or wands that have come into contact with blood or bloody water MUST be thoroughly cleaned, disinfected, and allowed to dry before re-using, to protect not only you but also your next clients.

Blood is mostly water, but the hemoglobin, white blood cells, and other solid matter in it make it denser than water - which means it migrates quickly to the backing and when it dries, it has a gluey sort of grip on the fibers that can make it difficult to re-suspend. Peroxides are great for breaking up the solid matter in blood and suspending it in "bubbles" of oxygen, and at higher concentrations (5% and up) they act as disinfectants. The iron in blood which gives it its color can be handled with rust removers (remember, rust is oxidized iron) after all other elements of the spill are handled.

Feces is more prone to carry bacterial pathogens than viral ones, but the concept is the same - even dried, it's dangerous. Treat it as you would blood.

Check your state regulations, by the way - any materials that are to be discarded which may have blood or fecal matter on them can't usually just be thrown away; they must be treated as medical waste and disposed of appropriately. We don't do that with bloody tissues after our own nosebleed, obviously... but when you're dealing with large amounts of someone else's bodily fluids, it makes sense to be aware of regulations and plan accordingly.

Yes, I hear "I've been doing this for (fill in the blank) years and I never got sick. You're just trying to scare me" a lot. And all I have to say is, you only have to be wrong once.

I've seen two guys die. Two is two too many.

I will NOT have one of you be number three.
 

ccclean

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IF that was the only carpet with blood and feces and IF that room is as small as it looks in the pictures, then SHAME ON THEM for not replacing it. It would have been cheaper, safer and healthier to replace it.

It was an old man, he fell and was there for two days. I certainly could’ve shamed him for having me clean it but I think he felt bad enough. I did this, the stairs and a hall for $175, I could’ve charged him $600 and he would’ve paid. but I think he needed a break. It’s gross but it’s my job.
 
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smart n kleen

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It was an old man, he fell and was there for two days. I certainly could’ve shamed him for having me clean it but I think he felt bad enough. I did this, the stairs and a hall for $175, I could’ve charged him $600 and he would’ve paid. but I think he needed a break. It’s gross but it’s my job.
You did your good deed for the month
 
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