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Matrix all fiber rinse

Qbguru1987

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May 17, 2020
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Hey guys I just bought some Matrix all fiber rinse. It has excellent reviews and a good price. However, I noticed that it has a prop 65 attachment to it. That a certain chemical in it can cause cancer or birth defects. This is extremely concerning to me and I am considering not using it. I promote using non toxic chemicals, and I wouldn't want to harm someone's family. What are your guys thoughts on this matter?

Am I just being an idealist? Or is there a true cause for concern?
 

Dadio

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May 14, 2020
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but technically alcohol and water mix so they aren't an emulsification. But you are correct together they get the grease.
 

Ed Cruz

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Hey guys I just bought some Matrix all fiber rinse. It has excellent reviews and a good price. However, I noticed that it has a prop 65 attachment to it. That a certain chemical in it can cause cancer or birth defects. This is extremely concerning to me and I am considering not using it. I promote using non toxic chemicals, and I wouldn't want to harm someone's family. What are your guys thoughts on this matter?

Am I just being an idealist? Or is there a true cause for concern?
For synthetics that aren’t totally trashed just buy some Bonnetpro Rocket encapsulating prespray. Use just plain ole clear water as your rinse. Anything that doesn’t get rinsed out fully remains as a polymer that can be vacuumed out later and keeps the carpet cleaner. It’s nice knowing whatever prespray residue you leave behind will Won’t have adverse affects. I’ve cleaned some jobs part bonnet clean part HWE all with one prespray.
 
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Tom Forsythe

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Mar 20, 2006
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Returning to the first issue about Prop 65. It used to be a good regulation as what it restricted was generally an item of concern and we moved away from any Prop 65. Recent additions or emphasis actually included coffee on Prop 65 list. It was a watershed moment and even Prop 65 soon removed the warning from coffee. I have a picture in my office a Starbuck's in California with large posters discussing Prop 65 warning.
Now the standard forces a manufacturer to prove that their product does not contain over 1 part per million of trace chemical not intentionally added. Most of these trace ingredients are highly volatile and quickly evaporate away during manufacturing process and are probably not even in the bottle. This standard does not include levels in ready to use solutions. So you have a rinse at 2 parts per million in the concentrate and dilute at 1 to 320 resulting in .006 parts per million. At that standard, I am confident that some drinking water in the state of California should have Prop 65 warnings at every faucet and drinking fountain.

For the issue of adding chemicals to the rinse system. Some raws like phosphates and surfactants work well enough at high dilutions. Other ingredients like hydrogen peroxide, encapsulants and solvents are likely not noticeable in terms of performance at dilutions of 1 to 320.
 

Tom Forsythe

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Mar 20, 2006
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Alcohol is a solvent and works at the right level. It is soluble in water like glycol ether EB, DB, DPM, propandiol, etc. These solvents are used more readily as their flash point is over 100 degrees F. Alcohol is a 73 degree F flashpoint which is dangerous in a manufacturing plant. We add some alcohol to fragrances made in our explosion proof room. The alcohol can volatilize more fragrance in the air than water alone.

VOC laws generally prohibit volatile solvents at .1% in ready to use pre-spray which is 3.3% in the concentrate when diluted as a 1 to 32 dilution. . This level works well for pre-spray, which has dwell time. At a 1 to 320 dilution solvents including alcohol do not do much. You spray it on and you immediately extract 80% of it. Alcohol works in pre-sprays , but the math in dilution for rinses greatly reduces any impact. If it worked I would add to rinses, but consider it a waste of money. Some solvents are added to powdered rinses for creating a texture for the formula but not for any cleaning performance.
 
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Jim Davisson

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Adding it to my rinses has been my practice for about 15 years.

It speeds up my cleaning process so overall, $2 a day saves me money In the long run, no question.

since it speeds up dry time,...it solidifies my relationship with clients.

I'd try it before you cast an opinion.
I can tell it's an "opinion", my man.....cuz otherwise it would come out much differently.
No it doesn't, but keep preaching. Science doesn't back this up, even a little bit.
 

Tom Forsythe

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As a manufacturer who has to follow regulations for all states, I am limited in the amount that I can add. Based on these limits, alcohol does not do much.

However, if you add MUCH more than we are allowed then you can see these properties. I would hesitate to recommend on a public forum based on potential hazards with dealing with such a volatile solvent. Storage of large or multiple small containers in an enclosed van whose operating temperatures always exceed alcohol's flash point would not be advisable. Static pressure or a random spark could create an unpleasant circumstance in the case of a spill in pure form on your van.
 
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Tom Forsythe

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Mar 20, 2006
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I have heard of bottled hydrogen peroxide products exploding in vans. I am also thinking of van accidents where bottles are ripped open with flammable contents leaking out.

32 ounces in headpack is still only 1 part in 320 (.3%) when metered normally through most truckmounts. After a few seconds with the wand extraction (80% removal), it is only .06%. The alcohol will be used in defoaming leaving even less on the carpet.

 

Tom Forsythe

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Mar 20, 2006
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Thanks for giving my voice life with a good forum discussion!!

40 volume converts to 12% hydrogen peroxide which is 50% stronger than any of our products. When you cross the 8% threshold the product faces more regulatory reviews.

One primary item that cleaners miss in their home made brews is surfactancy. It is one of the 3 pillars for building quality cleaners. It is easy to add more alkalinity or solvency, but surfactancy is missing. I usually start with getting the right surfactant for any product before I look for alkalinity and solvency. Next is selecting special ingredients which further define any product. I enjoy formulating as it is not only science but is a form of creativity. One of branded statements: BRIDGEPOINT SYSTEMS: where the science of cleaning becomes an art.