Looking to get into crime scene clean up. | TruckMount Forums #1 Carpet Cleaning Forums

Looking to get into crime scene clean up.

beau

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So while dealing with the police(Another issue about a neighbor) they asked since my company had the word "bio" in it if i did Trauma clean up, as no one in the area currently does so, and they end up bringing in guys from 3 hours away.

Of course this got me thinking that I should actually expand my training and begin offering such a service. Only problem is I cant seem to find anything online about what kind of courses I would need in Canada, it almost seems like the "certification" aspect of it is not regulated at all. Anyone know if thats the case? Either way Im going to seek training but just want to make sure that what courses I take are the correct ones for being legal.

If there is not an actual legal certification thats needed, does anyone have any recommendations? I was thinking of doing the online training through Amdecon over the winter(https://amdecon.com/cts-course/)

And before anyone asks, I dont mind blood/gore And no I don't get squeamish, I can also deal with grieving people well enough.(At least I believe so on that last part)

Thanks for taking the time to answer these questions and help a guy out! Cheers!
 

OldCarpetVet

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So while dealing with the police(Another issue about a neighbor) they asked since my company had the word "bio" in it if i did Trauma clean up, as no one in the area currently does so, and they end up bringing in guys from 3 hours away.

Of course this got me thinking that I should actually expand my training and begin offering such a service. Only problem is I cant seem to find anything online about what kind of courses I would need in Canada, it almost seems like the "certification" aspect of it is not regulated at all. Anyone know if thats the case? Either way Im going to seek training but just want to make sure that what courses I take are the correct ones for being legal.

If there is not an actual legal certification thats needed, does anyone have any recommendations? I was thinking of doing the online training through Amdecon over the winter(https://amdecon.com/cts-course/)

And before anyone asks, I dont mind blood/gore And no I don't get squeamish, I can also deal with grieving people well enough.(At least I believe so on that last part)

Thanks for taking the time to answer these questions and help a guy out! Cheers!
I highly recommend that you talk with John Klucznik @BonnetPro as he has done quite a bit of crime scene clean up work in the past. He will be a valuable source of to you. Good luck to you.
 

Scott W

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Amdecon is a good source of training. American Bio-Recovery (ABRA) is another place for information. Not sure if it is available in Canada.

Our organization hosts training classes from Restoration Scinces Academy and sometimes other trainers. IICRC is developing a new class in trauma clean-up that will be available soon.

Check with Safety Express / Select Pro for training in Canada. They have 11 locations including BC, I think Moncton is the city. No classes scheduled in BC right now, but we will schedule if there is enough interest. So, let the local manager know if you want to attend a class there.
 
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Mama Fen

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I took RSA's class, and it is indeed educational - not only from the standpoint of bloodborne pathogens and their danger, but from the standpoint of dealing in a professional and compassionate manner with the family and friends involved.

Most guys in the business say it's not the smell, the mess, or the maggots that eventually drives them out - it's the emotional impact once they allow themselves to imagine the fear or pain the victim was in. A technician who allows themselves to feel too much empathy for the people involved very quickly leaves the industry. Conversely, a completely unsympathetic and cold technician will have a hard time finding work.

An OSHA 10-hour course is also highly recommended, and any Health and Safety equivalencies you can find.

Make sure you document everything before and after the job, particularly if anything that might be considered evidence (bullets or fragments, drugs/drug paraphenelia, body parts, etc) is uncovered in the process. Arrange for biohazardous wastes to be disposed of in accordance with local laws. Develop a good relationship with the local police and first responders, get a name as a respectful, thorough, and dependable person, and you'll soon find more work than you can handle.
 
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beau

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Thanks for the replies guys. I'll definitely be checking out a few more things before I jump into this.
 

Luky

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So while dealing with the police(Another issue about a neighbor) they asked since my company had the word "bio" in it if i did Trauma clean up, as no one in the area currently does so, and they end up bringing in guys from 3 hours away.

Of course this got me thinking that I should actually expand my training and begin offering such a service. Only problem is I cant seem to find anything online about what kind of courses I would need in Canada, it almost seems like the "certification" aspect of it is not regulated at all. Anyone know if thats the case? Either way Im going to seek training but just want to make sure that what courses I take are the correct ones for being legal.

If there is not an actual legal certification thats needed, does anyone have any recommendations? I was thinking of doing the online training through Amdecon over the winter(https://amdecon.com/cts-course/)

And before anyone asks, I dont mind blood/gore And no I don't get squeamish, I can also deal with grieving people well enough.(At least I believe so on that last part)

Thanks for taking the time to answer these questions and help a guy out! Cheers!
I believe that from aside business perspective( a big $ in it) there is a different protocol( that you'll learn if you put effort in the process) and another aspect( mind & body) There is a nothing that can prepare you for what you believe you you can take in.
Unfortunately, I can't provide any pictures, but if you PM me, I can elaborate more. Mark my words, you'll have more questions without seeing body on the scene .
Great example on how to deal with this situation are medical workers ( nurses, doctors, etc) You can get used to it, but like with anything else , persistence, determination and inner cool (mental stability) is a must
 

Luky

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Thanks for the replies guys. I'll definitely be checking out a few more things before I jump into this.
What's new with you, did you look deeper in new endeavor ? If yes, what's your status. You got me thinking. I'm in area that crime scene is being probably cleaned be ServPro- flood and disaster specialists.( just guessing) Maybe I got to get my feet wet after all...
 
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beau

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What's new with you, did you look deeper in new endeavor ? If yes, what's your status. You got me thinking. I'm in area that crime scene is being probably cleaned be ServPro- flood and disaster specialists.( just guessing) Maybe I got to get my feet wet after all...
Hey, just looked more into costs, talked a little with a local officer, looks like the courses are about 1200$ all together. Besides that the inlaws had a house fire so honestly have been dealing with that instead and postponed my research.
 
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OldCarpetVet

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Hey, just looked more into costs, talked a little with a local officer, looks like the courses are about 1200$ all together. Besides that the inlaws had a house fire so honestly have been dealing with that instead and postponed my research.
Your update is much appreciated.(y)
 

Robert86

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I took RSA's class, and it is indeed educational - not only from the standpoint of bloodborne pathogens and their danger, but from the standpoint of dealing in a professional and compassionate manner with the family and friends involved.

Most guys in the business say it's not the smell, the mess, or the maggots that eventually drives them out - it's the emotional impact once they allow themselves to imagine the fear or pain the victim was in. A technician who allows themselves to feel too much empathy for the people involved very quickly leaves the industry. Conversely, a completely unsympathetic and cold technician will have a hard time finding work.

An OSHA 10-hour course is also highly recommended, and any Health and Safety equivalencies you can find.

Make sure you document everything before and after the job, particularly if anything that might be considered evidence (bullets or fragments, drugs/drug paraphenelia, body parts, etc) is uncovered in the process. Arrange for biohazardous wastes to be disposed of in accordance with local laws. Develop a good relationship with the local police and first responders, get a name as a respectful, thorough, and dependable person, and you'll soon find more work than you can handle.
I believe that from aside business perspective( a big $ in it) there is a different protocol( that you'll learn if you put effort in the process) and another aspect( mind & body) There is a nothing that can prepare you for what you believe you you can take in.
Unfortunately, I can't provide any pictures, but if you PM me, I can elaborate more. Mark my words, you'll have more questions without seeing body on the scene .
Great example on how to deal with this situation are medical workers ( nurses, doctors, etc) You can get used to it, but like with anything else , persistence, determination and inner cool (mental stability) is a must
The psychological element is big in any work you might do around a trauma scene. You need to figure out the appropriate level of detachment from the situation. It can be natural to joke at a trauma scene. Its not a bad thing, joking can help with that detachment, help our brains handle the situation, it's kind of therapeutic. And some of the crudest, most offensive jokes I've ever heard were from cops with a dead body just 5 feet away. But there is a time and place. Anyone other than a coworker around, its not the time or place.

If you work alone, then find something to keep your mind distracted, especially if you're working in the evenings. Something a lot of officers and forensics persons I know do when they have to be alone at a crime scene, if its appropriate, they listen to an audiobook on their iPod to help distract their mind, otherwise it will wander to some seriously dark places.
 

Luky

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The psychological element is big in any work you might do around a trauma scene. You need to figure out the appropriate level of detachment from the situation. It can be natural to joke at a trauma scene. Its not a bad thing, joking can help with that detachment, help our brains handle the situation, it's kind of therapeutic. And some of the crudest, most offensive jokes I've ever heard were from cops with a dead body just 5 feet away. But there is a time and place. Anyone other than a coworker around, its not the time or place.

If you work alone, then find something to keep your mind distracted, especially if you're working in the evenings. Something a lot of officers and forensics persons I know do when they have to be alone at a crime scene, if its appropriate, they listen to an audiobook on their iPod to help distract their mind, otherwise it will wander to some seriously dark places.
Easier said than done, but yes. You're absolutely right. A detachment is what we're looking for in such situations, but everything depends on each body chemical balance. If "good" chemicals are prevalent in your body, you're a winner.
 

Luky

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Hey, just looked more into costs, talked a little with a local officer, looks like the courses are about 1200$ all together. Besides that the inlaws had a house fire so honestly have been dealing with that instead and postponed my research.
Sorry about your misfortune. $1200 is for OSHA course, right? It's more expensive than Robs Academy classes;)
If I get some info, I'll share with you, Stay strong and prosperous!
 

Scott W

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beau

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Aramsco and Interlink Supply and Bridgepoint host trauma scene cleaning training classes taught by several different groups. You can find the entire list on out training schedule.
Here are a some:

Paulsboro NJ http://www.cvent.com/Events/Calendar/Calendar.aspx?cal=ab53c6cb-fee0-44a6-a384-c51a2a4b32c0

This class will be held in 8 to 10 locations around the country this year - http://www.cvent.com/Events/Calendar/Calendar.aspx?cal=ab53c6cb-fee0-44a6-a384-c51a2a4b32c0

Hey thanks for the links! Will check that out.
 
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