Is Scotchgard safe? | TruckMount Forums #1 Carpet Cleaning Forums

Is Scotchgard safe?

Johnny Bravo

Hacking my way though life, one room at a time.
Apr 25, 2011
23,948
8,412
113
San Pedro, Ca
TheJohnnyOnTheSpot.Com
Real Name
John Sheridan
Business Location
United States
isent it baned in austraila becouse its a carsnagenic.?????

This is true. A study was done and it showed that if you have a high enough percentage in your blood stream, you'll begin to speak with an Australian accent. :p

Sorry, couldn't resist.
 

john gerding

Premium VIP
Aug 1, 2012
14,357
6,131
113
Real Name
Deadpool
Business Location
United States
I never had any complaints about scotchguard odor or otherwise...my company uses a solvent protectant... i dont like the stuff at all it smells strong but they cover the odor with obvious vanilla scent and to top that off it will cause a skin rash if contact happens but i diligently warn my customers and make them put shoes on before i apply it.
 

Pinosan

Premium VIP
Nov 22, 2011
10,672
3,964
113
California
allpointscarpetcare.com
Real Name
Martin Sanchez
Business Location
United States
is there EVER a thread you don't somehow try and turn into a pop for interlink?
chill out bro That is his job and his company pays the dues. I would much rather read his sales pitches that come along with knowledge and valuable information then reading from idiots like Brett Sabre .
 

Art Kelley

Well-Known Member
Feb 9, 2009
1,101
382
83
Clawson,MI
Real Name
Art Kelley
Nothing is totally safe if used wrong. People have drowned in a bucket of water. But used properly Scotchgard is safe. The key concern is not to inhale the spray. You don't need your lungs coated with protector.

.
I think we all know the answer to this question. But if not, I will tell you. Scotchgard will cause you (the applicator) health problems. Lung disease, cancer, I really don't want to think about it. I don't sell the crap, but I apply it ( maybe 2 or 3 times a month) when customers ask me to. It is impossible to to not inhale the crap while you apply it. A very successful upseller of this very unsafe product is putting his life at risk. But hey, we all die.
 

Zarz

Well-Known Member
Feb 1, 2012
620
340
63
Victoria
Real Name
John Zahra
Business Location
Australia
I was a licensed applicator of 3M Scotchgard in Australia when I received a letter from 3M Australia basically stating that:
"Due to environmental concerns, 3M have chosen to remove its Scotchgard product from sales". Within the letter, I do recall them stating that it was not due to concerns regarding health.
I'm now using Dupont Teflon Advance.
 

Johnny Bravo

Hacking my way though life, one room at a time.
Apr 25, 2011
23,948
8,412
113
San Pedro, Ca
TheJohnnyOnTheSpot.Com
Real Name
John Sheridan
Business Location
United States
I was a licensed applicator of 3M Scotchgard in Australia when I received a letter from 3M Australia basically stating that:
"Due to environmental concerns, 3M have chosen to remove its Scotchgard product from sales". Within the letter, I do recall them stating that it was not due to concerns regarding health.
I'm now using Dupont Teflon Advance.

Quick question please, do you have an Australian accent now? :p
 

Deron06

Deron
Premium VIP
Sep 25, 2010
10,927
3,035
113
Real Name
Deron Najarian
Business Location
United States
I never had any complaints about scotchguard odor or otherwise...my company uses a solvent protectant... i dont like the stuff at all it smells strong but they cover the odor with obvious vanilla scent and to top that off it will cause a skin rash if contact happens but i diligently warn my customers and make them put shoes on before i apply it.
Sort of like putting lipstick on a wildebeest, huh? Carpet protectors are extremely suspect when it comes to health, cancer etc. and scotchguard or any other solvent-based product is a sure thing if you are looking to get cancer. Read up on it on the internet and make your own conclusions. I have made mine and I don't sell the poison. I would rather have stains than cut 20 years off of my life and poison my customers. I can only imagine how bad it is to be rolling around on that stuff every day.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Johnny Bravo

rugslayer

Premium VIP
Mar 30, 2009
6,001
90
48
Pennsylvania
www.johnsoncarpetcare.com
Real Name
Mark Johnson
Business Location
United States
I never push the sale of carpet protection. It contradicts my perception of a residue free cleaning, and I work my machines to do their (my) best to get the carpets as dry as possible. The protectant makes the drying process substantially longer. Great response from all above as always.
 
Jul 28, 2013
40
11
8
www.magikistrugcleaning.com
Real Name
Josh Bass
Protectors that can be applied to your carpet "safely" I use products that have been deemed safe by California safety regulations...they have the most strict. I use a product called Microseal. It is non toxic, non allergenic and one of its main components is silicone. I know the argument may arise that silicone over time may attract soil and turn yellow, but not this high grade hybrid. It is worth looking into because of its high profitability. You need to have the rights to sell it in your particular area to get it. If you can get it, do it! It has a degree of permanency and can reduce sun fade on many fabrics.

It is applied with a solvent base...dont confuse solvent with danger. Just make sure you apply the protector in a well ventilated area. The solvent is used because microseal should primarily be applied to high end fabrics. Using a solvent based carrier is important to reduce the risk in color run on easy bleeding fabrics or oriental rugs.
 

deriols

Member
Aug 8, 2019
42
2
8
Real Name
mikkes
I believe Scotchgard is safe or I wouldn't use it. As long as you use a proper sprayer and mix it properly the smell isn't that bad at all. The undiluted product is naturally going to smell much stronger. Here is a recent thread on the same subject you might want to read.
 

wandwizard

Randy Dockins
Premium VIP
Nov 12, 2008
8,462
3,259
113
Real Name
Randy Dockins
Business Location
United States
I believe Scotchgard is safe or I wouldn't use it. As long as you use a proper sprayer and mix it properly the smell isn't that bad at all. The undiluted product is naturally going to smell much stronger. Here is a recent thread on the same subject you might want to read.
I see you know how to copy and paste. Good for you.
 

Clean-n-mean

Well-Known Member
Feb 9, 2018
2,647
1,200
113
Real Name
Todd santora
Nothing is totally safe if used wrong. People have drowned in a bucket of water. But used properly Scotchgard is safe. The key concern is not to inhale the spray. You don't need your lungs coated with protector.

Use sprayer at recommended pressure. I think that is 35 to 55 PSI. To much pressure makes smaller droplets that float in the air.

Use the proper sized tip on your sprayer. Use an 06 or larger. Again, the smaller jet sizes will atomize or make a mist that floats in the air and can be inhaled.

Keep the spray tip about 12" off the floor. If you get too close to the floor, some of the spray bounces back into the air. If you have the wand way above the floor, too much product is in the air.

This advice applies to any protector.

BTW - If you want a product that is both safe and EFFECTIVE try Maxim Advanced or Teflon.
I tried to buy it Scott and they will not ship to California!! The Maxim sounds awesome. I just have to find another way to try it out!
 

Tom Forsythe

Well-Known Member
Mar 20, 2006
362
604
93
Salt lake City, UT
Protectors offer 4 primary features. No protector does it all. Soil resistance, stain resistance, water repellency and oil repellency (surface or fiber). Maxim Advanced provides soil resistance, stain resistance (acid dye resistors) and oil repellency at fiber level. Advanced Protector with Teflon provides soil resistance, water repellency and oil repellency.

Silicones were mentioned above and they provide water repellency. However, they are re-soilers, provide no stain resistance once surface tension is broken, and provide no oil repellency. Silicones provide surface tension to fibers at 30 dynes/cm. This works for water since it has a surface energy of 72 dynes/cm. This does not work for oils as they have a surface energy of 25 dynes/cm. Fluorochemicals work on both oil and water as they lower surface tension to 15 dynes/cm. More solids will make any protector work better, but they will not change the science of surface tension.

The use of silicones only make sense on high end fabrics (not typically walked on) that are damaged by water like silk velvets in states where solvent-based fluorochemicals are not legal.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Scott W