Im new on the business, What chemicals should I use on the truck mount ?

Hacky-sack

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I've been at this 30 years. I keep it very simple.

One higher ph prespray
One acid rinse.

long gone are the days when we has natural fiber backed carpet and wide varieties of fabrics for upholstery.

All carpet nowdays is synthetic backing and most new upholstery is some type of poly.

You can keep this strategy with great soil removal and prevent browning and wicking.

I use Prochem All Fiber Deep as my rinse.
has Encap in it in addition to citric rinse

Chemiester Grease Eraser as pre treat
High enough ph and dilutes easily

Good to carry Fine Fabric detergent with sodium metabisulfite , in case you get light colored cotton or linen.
Also doubles as reducer for synthetic stains like red dye

No need to get cute on tile. Go nuts on anything with really aggressive ph. Any stripper will do.

Always carry acid for stubborn mineral deposit on grout lines.
Any product with Oxalic or phosphoric acid is great and not too aggressive.

Spotting , you'll want a few different items but even that doesn't need to be insane

I always carry Felsbar on me when I clean. It's impregnated with napthalene which is a solvent so it's a fairly wide spectrum spotter.
Will work on starchy spots, oil, grease and ink.

I also carry silicon caulking remover as it's excellent on all kids goop and acrylic paint.

Of course nail polish remover.

Wink rust remover. Best as it has hydroflouric acid. (Wear gloves)

Sallys creme 40 vol peroxide. Creme is easier to keep on spots while steamer hits it.
Get 20 vol for wool too.

Pick up a vapor steamer. Much faster and safer than just spray and go.

I always carry OMS for furniture stains as a first try before moving to reducer or oxidizer.

There's reasonable facsimiles that are specifically made by our industry but they don't work as well as the spotting agents I mentioned.
 
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Joseeltiti41

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I've been at this 30 years. I keep it very simple.

One higher ph prespray
One acid rinse.

long gone are the days when we has natural fiber backed carpet and wide varieties of fabrics for upholstery.

All carpet nowdays is synthetic backing and most new upholstery is some type of poly.

You can keep this strategy with great soil removal and prevent browning and wicking.

I use Prochem All Fiber Deep as my rinse.
has Encap in it in addition to citric rinse

Chemiester Grease Eraser as pre treat
High enough ph and dilutes easily

Good to carry Fine Fabric detergent with sodium metabisulfite , in case you get light colored cotton or linen.
Also doubles as reducer for synthetic stains like red dye

No need to get cute on tile. Go nuts on anything with really aggressive ph. Any stripper will do.

Always carry acid for stubborn mineral deposit on grout lines.
Any product with Oxalic or phosphoric acid is great and not too aggressive.

Spotting , you'll want a few different items but even that doesn't need to be insane

I always carry Felsbar on me when I clean. It's impregnated with napthalene which is a solvent so it's a fairly wide spectrum spotter.
Will work on starchy spots, oil, grease and ink.

I also carry silicon caulking remover as it's excellent on all kids goop and acrylic paint.

Of course nail polish remover.

Wink rust remover. Best as it has hydroflouric acid. (Wear gloves)

Sallys creme 40 vol peroxide. Creme is easier to keep on spots while steamer hits it.
Get 20 vol for wool too.

Pick up a vapor steamer. Much faster and safer than just spray and go.

I always carry OMS for furniture stains as a first try before moving to reducer or oxidizer.

There's reasonable facsimiles that are specifically made by our industry but they don't work as well as the spotting agents I mentioned.
Thank you !!
 

SRD

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Please help me , What chemical should I use on the truck mount to clean carpet, and What’s the best and quality and price equipment to use on duct cleaning?
Go to a class man, not trying to be mean but if you dont even know what chemical to use you need to get some class time before you end up buying someone's carpet or furniture.....promise im not trying to be a dick
 
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Hacky-sack

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Go to a class man, not trying to be mean but if you dont even know what chemical to use you need to get some class time before you end up buying someone's carpet or furniture.....promise im not trying to be a dick

You really think it's that complicated cleaning carpet these days with the tools and chems we got?

I think learning to tool on a TM can be some next level shit but today's carpets couldn't be simpler if you finish with a low ph rinse
 

Hacky-sack

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Go to a class man, not trying to be mean but if you dont even know what chemical to use you need to get some class time before you end up buying someone's carpet or furniture.....promise im not trying to be a dick
The long steep learning curve stuff can't be taught in a class.
Changing belts, finding water on commercial jobs, knowing which furniture can't touch wet carpet, knowing which wood thresholds can't be taped, avoiding hip level plastic drape hooks, blocking a five pronged swivel chair, setting up to correct length in all seasons on a long run, strategizing moves in small rooms with tons of furniture to shift.

IMO, any monkey could set a flow meter , spray and suck.
It's when the chem meter isn't drawing is when things call for knowledge. Good luck learning that shit in a class
 

Hacky-sack

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I'd DEFINITELY recommend working with a seasoned pro to learn what can't be taught in a class....but I built an addition and a pool from YouTube clips.
A class to clean a carpet?!.... I had one of the best instructors in the business and he told me zero o didn't already know.
Cleaning carpet ain't rocket surgery.
Upholstery technique is a lot to know but again,...there's nothing they can teach that you really need there either
 

Hacky-sack

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I think noobs should be on low pH the entire time until they know their ass from a hole in the ground. Save overwetting, it's hard to jack up anything on the acid side.
Except that I think that strategy has value for everyone.
Acid rinses give you more latitude to be chemically aggressive in pre treat.
Additionally, I like to soft hand of the finished product.

I've added alcohol to rinse for over a decade as it gives my low ph rinse the detergent quality of a high ph rinse.
 

Jim Davisson

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Except that I think that strategy has value for everyone.
Acid rinses give you more latitude to be chemically aggressive in pre treat.
Additionally, I like to soft hand of the finished product.

I've added alcohol to rinse for over a decade as it gives my low ph rinse the detergent quality of a high ph rinse.

Look up the sds on flex ice and see how it is buffered, it's kinda badass. High pH on the acid side results. Add alcohol if you think your dilution ratios impact dry times, I don't think they do from what you have stated previously.
 

Hacky-sack

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Except that I think that strategy has value for everyone.
Acid rinses give you more latitude to be chemically aggressive in pre treat.
Additionally, I like to soft hand of the finished product.

I've added alcohol to rinse for over a decade as it gives my low ph rinse the detergent quality of a high ph rinse.
Sds just says it's sulfamic acid which changes to nitrogen at high temps.
I'd be interested to know if that chemical change remains once it cools.

I have to reason to believe it would but I know a ton of guys like the product.

I like AFD cuz it also has Encap in it
 

Hacky-sack

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my chem rack is full cuz I do so many different services but if all I did was carpet, I really wouldn't need a chem rack.
Notice my Grease Eraser is closest....and I always have my Zep stripper, lye, distilled water, Sally O2 creme and ammonia in there. :D
 

SRD

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Are classes gonna tell him everything he needs to know of course not but it will give him a general idea of what to do and what not to do.
Your correct its not "rocket surgery" but there is alot of stuff you and i take for granted and just know cause we've done this shit for 20+ years.
Ive had new hires that literally took like 2 days before they could set up and start the machine without hesitation and thinking about it, to you and me its like breathing someone thats never done it not so much
 

Hacky-sack

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Are classes gonna tell him everything he needs to know of course not but it will give him a general idea of what to do and what not to do.
Your correct its not "rocket surgery" but there is alot of stuff you and i take for granted and just know cause we've done this shit for 20+ years.
Ive had new hires that literally took like 2 days before they could set up and start the machine without hesitation and thinking about it, to you and me its like breathing someone thats never done it not so much
That's exactly what I'm sayin.
Learning to set up, find water, know where to set dump line, start machine etc are all the things that take time but no IICRC class I know of teaches that
 

Hacky-sack

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Personally , I feel carpet classes aren't particularly valuable.
If I was giving advice to a family member starting out in a different area, I'd tell them to work for a good company for at least 6 months.

If I WAS gonna recommend a class it would be WDR, hands on upholstery, stone or area rugs.
 

SRD

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Ill agree with that if he has the option of going to work for someone that knows what their doing that would be ideal, but i still think classes are beneficial as well,like you said upholstery, and any restoration class, rugs especially