How to remove brown stain from viscose rug?

The Cleaning Artist

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Ok I will change my wording. WE clean viscose the same as natural fibers because it is a plant based fiber just like cotton.
 

Mama Fen

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Ok I will change my wording. WE clean viscose the same as natural fibers because it is a plant based fiber just like cotton.
It has plant content, certainly - but cotton comes from the cotton plant, whereas most of the cellulose in viscose comes from tree pulp, bamboo, and other "scrap" materials.

Because of this, cotton and viscose perform quite differently when wet; cotton gets stronger, viscose gets weaker.

Plus, since viscose production is almost exclusively done overseas in developing countries (due to the dangerous nature of the chemicals involved), there is little to no quality control and thus little information on what exact sources of cellulose are present in any given batch, or even their percentage of distribution within the fiber.
 

The Cleaning Artist

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Ok you clean it as a synthetic I'll clean it as a natural. I'll remove the browning and restore the rug back to its original condition. You can take it back with the stain still there. Say what you want it is a natural fiber and should be cleaned as such. Yes it has different characteristics jus as every fiber does.
 

Mama Fen

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Ok you clean it as a synthetic I'll clean it as a natural. I'll remove the browning and restore the rug back to its original condition. You can take it back with the stain still there. Say what you want it is a natural fiber and should be cleaned as such. Yes it has different characteristics jus as every fiber does.
If you insist on incorrectly classifying viscose as a 'natural fiber', then all I can do is wish you best of luck.

You're dead-set on 'educating' other cleaners here, and yet you're clearly wrong on a specific piece of important information that can be found with even the most cursory of searches, and is backed up by almost a century of textile science.

Do as you will. I won't be changing your mind, obviously.
 

sbsscn

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I have not had any of these problems with viscose rugs, I prespray I bonnet scrub I extract and I put fans on it.
Honestly Jeff,
I too have not had a problem....Yet!!

But strangely I've gotten a lot of calls from folks who have hired other "cleaners" and then call me to look at them to correct. After evaluating them I just could not risk trying to correct them.

Online I wont encourage anyone to cleaned them. But folks like you (in which i tip my hat and respect) have the experience and understand the fiber. I wont argue against you cause you too are DA MAN!
 

sbsscn

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I'm sure you can clean natural fibers with the best of them.

Viscose, however, is not a natural fiber - although it has many of the weaknesses of natural fibers due to its 'sausage' nature - and while you may be improving the appearance of the item, you are also causing massive damage including loss of dimensional stability, weakening of dye bonds, and deterioration of the fibers themselves (none of which are visible to the naked eye upon cleaning).

But to each his own.
You are so correct Mama, Viscose is Not a natural fiber, if anything its a regenerated fiber, artificial.
 
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sbsscn

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Ok you clean it as a synthetic I'll clean it as a natural. I'll remove the browning and restore the rug back to its original condition. You can take it back with the stain still there. Say what you want it is a natural fiber and should be cleaned as such. Yes it has different characteristics jus as every fiber does.
Its not a natural fiber, You might call it a cellulose and it does contain some but it is not a natural fiber.
Yes you can treat it and clean it like a natural cellulose but its a gamble. them boogers can brown like theres no tomorrow and correcting them is almost impossible. Its the characteristic of the fiber. It weakens as it gets wet, it can brown when expose to moisture, and even more when over wet, it is sensitive to Alkaline and high PH. If you already know all of this then good for you, but I will dare you to fiber Id a Viscose/rayon rug and
use Firestorm or Groutmaster on it and let it dwell in a wash pit and come back and tell us howd it go.


Natural fiber are
Wool-(protein)
Silk - (protein)
cotton, linen, raw un processed cotton/Haitian, Sisal, -(cellulose)
Nylon, polyester, polypropylene, acrylic- synthetics

regenerated
Rayon, Viscose, Lynocell, Art Silk, Banana silk, coconut silk

Youve been lucky, and even more have bragging rights...for now but you just wait, once it happens to you and or you wont be able to correct you'll see the light.


Want to experiment. Go and over wet some news paper half with water and half your your favorite high ph prespray, let it dwel, let it dry, and then after its dry try to correct it, and please comeback and report.

Do the challenge and report back what happened and what you learned.
 
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jtsunbrite

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Honestly Jeff,
I too have not had a problem....Yet!!

But strangely I've gotten a lot of calls from folks who have hired other "cleaners" and then call me to look at them to correct. After evaluating them I just could not risk trying to correct them.

Online I wont encourage anyone to cleaned them. But folks like you (in which i tip my hat and respect) have the experience and understand the fiber. I wont argue against you cause you too are DA MAN!
im not da man ,, I buy good chems,,, a lot of these fixes you and I have run across is because these other carpet cleaners are using regular carpet chems or laundry soap or they (listen to us talk chems and they mix their own stuff and then cry when they have problems)
When I do fix them I ask and get them to sign a release form, where I am not held responsible for any damage.
I usually use Rugsmack , but when I am fixing a rug I use Interlinks wool rug system..

Viscose like Mamma said tries to tear up when it get wet , you have to be gentle and quick and dry it fast.
so far so good ive had no trouble...

Bleeders I don't touch,, I recommend to a buddy who has his own cleaning vat for rugs.
You know how this business is, we are packed with jobs all week, you have to sneak off to grab a 3 day vacation.
Since 18 years old, ive never taken a week off,,, Ive been working... So most of my knowledge was learned by doing it.
 
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The Cleaning Artist

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Clean it how you want, If a rug is a blend, in other words multiple different fibers, we apply cleaning procedures for the most sensitive fiber. Always have and always will.
FWIW, I take a month off each year, 2 weeks in one block and two separate weeks. First one is coming up in 2.5 weeks
 

Scott W

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Viscose and other varieties of rayon are cellulose material. The cellulose goes through processes that break it down and then regenerate it into a fiber. But it is still plant material. I don't like to get hung-up over defining it as natural or synthetic. It is really something in between.

The original source of the cellulose in the feedstock makes little difference. It can be bamboo. It can be other plant fiber. When rayon was made in the USA, the main feedstock was cotton linters. These cotton scraps were what was available. Now that most rayon / viscose is made in Asia, they use more bamboo because that is more readily available, but cotton is still used.

There is certainly an increase in the volume of rayon / viscose in the market. This includes both area rugs and wall to wall carpet under the Tencel brand name. Something we should all be prepared to handle. When it passes through a designer's hands, this cheap fiber is somehow transformed into an expensive luxury item. You don't want to buy it because of some cleaning issue.
 

The Cleaning Artist

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Ok I will change my wording. WE clean viscose the same as natural fibers because it is a plant based fiber just like cotton.
My reference to cotton was both fibers come from a plant. I'm sure glad Scott W posted to this thread. Maybe yous will take his word, which was my, ah nevermind.
 

sbsscn

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Viscose and other varieties of rayon are cellulose material. The cellulose goes through processes that break it down and then regenerate it into a fiber. But it is still plant material. I don't like to get hung-up over defining it as natural or synthetic. It is really something in between.

The original source of the cellulose in the feedstock makes little difference. It can be bamboo. It can be other plant fiber. When rayon was made in the USA, the main feedstock was cotton linters. These cotton scraps were what was available. Now that most rayon / viscose is made in Asia, they use more bamboo because that is more readily available, but cotton is still used.

There is certainly an increase in the volume of rayon / viscose in the market. This includes both area rugs and wall to wall carpet under the Tencel brand name. Something we should all be prepared to handle. When it passes through a designer's hands, this cheap fiber is somehow transformed into an expensive luxury item. You don't want to buy it because of some cleaning issue.
I have also spoken to someone from china stating that cheaper versions also include bamboo, saw dust, and shredded newspaper to create the cellulose pulp.

It is my opinion that understanding the construction, characteristic, and chemistry along with experience will help avoid a tremendous amount of issues.

Today I encountered what had to be one of the worst combination of fibers, I communicated very well with my client.
She is a regular and has me clean her wool wall to wall about every 2-3 months, but this time she wanted me to clean her rug,
she barely bought it about 1 month ago, and her dog peed on it.
She paid $1,700 for a 6x9 not too expensive.
As always I identify and thoroughly inspect/evaluate her rug.

Blended of Wool, polypropylene,Jute or other grass, cotton and Rayon.

I warned her deeply of the negative consequences. She was not happy and was stressing on what to do. I did not want to touch it but she was really, really worried and was stressing.
I asked her to free me from any liability, and she agreed. I warned her of the browning, change of shape, pile distortion and she said just do it, if its a loss then whats the worst that can happen.

I cleaned it and it started to buckle and change shape, the jute started to brown, the stain did not go away,
But she was happy to know that i cleaned it. I could tell in her eyes that she trusted me and held no malice towards me, after all I had warned her. She paid the bill and I left.
 

mustangcarpet

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We don’t even touch viscose it’s OVER priced junk. A few months ago we had a sprayer accidentally leak on one and it was a 3,000$ rug! We sent it to a rug shop they got it out 98% the customer wasn’t happy so we bought it. 3,000$ for a rug that can’t be cleaned shouldn’t even be made. And yes, this ladies interior designer filled her whole house with these rugs. She’s mad now and fired her after learning what a waste of money it was on these rugs... Wool>
 

The Cleaning Artist

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Back to the top, those of you cleaning viscose rugs what are u charging? We are at $1.50 sqft
 

The Cleaning Artist

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This is the silk we cleaned and the room of white wool that was cleaned from a water damage in 2013 in a $3,000,000 home.
IMG_20130530_110322.jpg
 
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AZHome&Carpet

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What silk? The $100000 Textiles were Rugs I thought. Anyway, whatever cool pic however
 

The Cleaning Artist

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This was $10,000 silk bedroom set.
 
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The Cleaning Artist

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Digging through Google photos tryn to find pics at 3am. Right house wrong room I think. Found this one part of the set.
 

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