How much is too much heat?

DakotaG

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It seems like for the most part the highest heat most guys say they run is 240..at the machine of course, let's not get into at machine vs. at wand for now..

I have seen some guys say they run 300 though..

Of course the highest heat you'd want would differ depending on what fiber type you are working with. Natural or synthetic and any type in between...

Is there a spectrum for heat and fiber type that anyone has? Idk how to @RobAllen for sure, but it would be cool to make a heat usage chart like u did for your presprays. I know of course there is a lot of room for opinion on the subject lol..

Would be great to know for more delicate upholstery and what not too.

So at the very least, what is the absolute hottest anyone would go if it was easily possible?
 

JD5150

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I usually don't go over 220 degrees. If I do it is either super greasy or nasty.
Anything over 210 messes up the valves on the tools. I set it atm 220 and it delivers 210 at the tool all day long. I can go to 250 or 300 but never need over 250.

I have damaged carpet at 250 so I don't go there only if it is junk carpet needing replaced and is nasty. If I do go to 250 three or four times the parts in the tool valve are toast and needs a new kit.


All my carpet wand/Zipper tools are set a 10/12 flow. I do once in a while bump them up on a real dirty jobs to 16 flow and my diesel heater still will deliver it where I set it. I have not tested it but I think it will deliver it at 24 flow using 3/8 inch hose, pressure washer quick connects and 3/8 inch hose on the tool without a problem.

Never heard of anyone using 300 degrees on carpets. They got to be crazy
 

The Cleaning Artist

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Yes hot! It's a valuable tool when used correctly but dangerous if you don't stay on top of things.
 

Anderson

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there is a point of deminishing returns on heat.....

where you are not really getting very much water down to flush the carpet only steam........

pressure washers clean brick, cement.....
and do a better job at cleaning tile at least wo scrubbing......
and they only use around 170 degrees......

it is better to have higher vacuum less heat and more water flow....thats my experience......
 

Joe cool

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received_631387813873811.jpeg
 
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Todd the Cleaner

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I’d say no more than 220.

Personally I prefer around 180.
 

Anderson

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just remember 250 at the machine is not 250 at the wand....
all that counts is what is hitting the carpet......

all these make a difference:
1. - wand vs.- zipper & bonzer
2. - water flow..continual vs. trigger
3. - 1/4" vs 3/8" hose
4. - wire braded hose vs. polyurethane

just adjusting these 4 - you can increase your heat with the same TM by at least 40-50 degrees...

we are losing 10-20 degrees per 50'
on any 1/4" wire braded hose......
from numerous testings....
 

Scott W

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Liquid water delivers more heat energy to the carpet than steam. Once in the atmosphere 200 to 212 F (depending upon your altitude) is the most effective for softening grease and oils, and for taking advantage of the chemistry. (Some detergents have cloud points lower than 200, but none over 212.)

Your temperature may be higher at the truck, but that just under 212 at the carpet is most effective for most situations.

Wool and many natural fibers should be cleaned at lower temperatures, around 150 to 160 for wool.

Higher temperatures create more pressure and thus are harder on hoses and plumbing. There is also increased safety risks if a super-heated pressurized line breaks.
 

Ken Raddon

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When I had a kerosene fire breather I set it at 240° ruined a lot of hoses and valves. When I was going to sell it I turned it down 10° a week to see how low I could go thereby helping to determine what if any smaller <read cheaper, machine I could use/buy. I got all the way down to 180° atm before I noticed a difference regardless of the carpet soil load. What a difference that made. No more hoses going hissy far too soon. Oh and less fallout of them chemical so my jets and filters took less attention.

PS Now I am for the most part onto another profession and use a mytee portable with a tank type heater and I preheat the water with a bucket heater. Don't feel too bad for me I only do a 2-3 jobs a month. Oh and I charge 33% more than I did when I was full time bc I know it is me they want doing their carpet.
 

wandwizard

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If you can't clean at 220 at the wand then it's not because you don't have enough heat. That much I'm doggone sure of. At 240 you're flirting with either an insurance claim or personal bodily injury. At 300 degrees, and I'd have to see that to believe it, you're flirting with disaster on an epic scale. Black death comes to mind. High heat only really matters in certain situations. I probably work between 180 to 200 measured at the wand most of the time. Could you imagine what would happen if that 300 degrees going through the hose ruptured spraying superheated water all over you, the customer's belongings and God forbid, the customer or their child? Anyone who works that hot has a great big hole between their ears.
 

The Cleaning Artist

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While I don't advocate for everyone to use high heat but we do. Normal cleaning the truck is 260/280°. Hoses get replaced often, valves last about 6 months between rebuilds. Yes it makes a difference! I would never tell another cleaner to use high heat beyond their comfort zone as there is quit a few precautions that must be took into account b4 one drags the hoses into a home.
 
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wandwizard

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While I don't advocate for everyone to use high heat but we do. Normal cleaning the truck is 260/280°. Hoses get replaced often, valves last about 6 months between rebuilds. Yes it makes a difference! I would never tell another cleaner to use high heat beyond their comfort zone as there is quit a few precautions that must be took into account b4 one drags the hoses into a home.
You'd have to prove conclusively that even 280 cleans better than say 240. My very educated guess is that you cannot. I still say you are flirting with disaster at temps that high. I wouldn't do it even if I could. Even 240 is stupid hot water and is definitely getting into what I'd call the danger zone. It's your funeral so you don't have to listen to me. I hope nothing bad ever happens, but this is one thing for certain, IT CAN BE VERY DANGEROUS.
 
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Anderson

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i have lowered my heat every year for the last 5 years...

while increasing my vacuum and my water flow....

even if you only have 150-160 you can outclean any temperature - 250++++.....if you have more water flow

focus on vacuum and double your water flow....
and basically double your cleaning capabilities.......

pressure washer guys have proven this years before TM came around....
 

Jim Davisson

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i have lowered my heat every year for the last 5 years...

while increasing my vacuum and my water flow....

even if you only have 150-160 you can outclean any temperature - 250++++.....if you have more water flow

focus on vacuum and double your water flow....
and basically double your cleaning capabilities.......

pressure washer guys have proven this years before TM came around....

^^^^ So much this

Our 3 cord portable maintains 160° at 1.75 GPM (3/4 on 1/4 off on the trigger) with 200+ CFM at the end of the hose. It cleans thoroughly and quickly, with TM performance.
 

The Cleaning Artist

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You'd have to prove conclusively that even 280 cleans better than say 240. My very educated guess is that you cannot. I still say you are flirting with disaster at temps that high. I wouldn't do it even if I could. Even 240 is stupid hot water and is definitely getting into what I'd call the danger zone. It's your funeral so you don't have to listen to me. I hope nothing bad ever happens, but this is one thing for certain, IT CAN BE VERY DANGEROUS.
In my testing and our cleaning style yes it does work better. Most don't have a machine that can maintain heat at that level with any kind of flow. Only experienced techs should be equipped with that kind of power. Our machines are not little toys, they are the best of the best.