How much heat is enough heat, how much heat is too much?

sabrpilot

Albert Clark
Aug 6, 2011
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albert clark
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Question:

How much heat is enough and how much heat is "too much?"

IS TOO MUCH NEVER ENOUGH?

At what point does all of the emphasis on having massive amounts of heat and the added cost of heat ex-changers, both short and long term start to border-line RIDICULOUS? I can understand hx in the colder regions as a pre-heating source of course, but does too much heat not damage the integrity of the carpet or its backing, regardless of the type?

I can also understand wanting a heat source that can keep up with your particular cleaning habits, region and/or equipment...but, is there not a limit or a standard "rule-of-thumb" as to just how much heat is enough?

For me and a couple of my friends...light up a Little Giant 2HT/3HT, KNOCK-OUT PRE-SPRAY, a little agitation, some dwell time and I'm cleaning carpet....WELL.

To each their own I guess....

Thanks!;)

ac
 

Nick N

Well-Known Member
May 27, 2008
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www.truckmountforums.com
a heat exchanger cost less to operate. If one is using a gasoline engine one is already using the btu's. Might as well capture them. Many hx perform as well or better than than a 2 or 3 ht . Many hx are rated to 5,000 psi, little giant is about 800 psi. As for heat 150 is my sweet spot. I can get it cleant with more heat or less heat.
 

Bud B

New Member
Jan 30, 2011
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Mid Coast, Maine
Olefin (polypropylene)....oliefin fibers are least absorbent, it repels water. For your cleaning process, this means your cleaning solution will go to the backing of the carpet faster and create "wicking" on the surface as the carpet dries. Another problem with Olefin : It likes oily soils.

Has a specific gravity less than 1 (water is denser)

Heat sensitive: damage can be caused by temperatures of 250 degrees, and a melting temperature near 325 degrees. Be carful when dragging furniture as the heat friction can actually "melt" olefin fibers.

Maybecome brittle in direct sunlight

Has a tendancy to mat down.

Always solution dyed (with pigment) and is naturally stain resitant because lack of dye sites, and is not affected by bleaches, including sodium Hypochlorite (houshold bleach).

To prevent wicking, prevacuum, make additional extraction passes and use air movers.


This was taken from my IIcrc coarse manual, note the heat damage points. This is an example of where to much heat may cost YOU a new rug for your customer. Yes you do lose heat between the TM and the carpet, if you was running 250 degrees at the machine, you would not get that at the carpet unless your TM is sittin' in the room you are cleaning. You also lose heat between the jets and the carpet, Duane explained that in detail in a recent thread.

I probably did not have to put most of the page on here but thought it may come in handy for some.

Bud
 

Nick N

Well-Known Member
May 27, 2008
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I have run high heat on olefin. Never had a problem . Wicking is caussed because the olefin does not want to let go of the oily spots that happen. French fries, burgers , or sugars that end up on the floor. High heat is not necessary to clean olfin. A good enzyme product and a great rinsing usully corrects the problem , sometimes post bonnet will help too.
 
May 6, 2008
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D Oxley
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United States
Question:

How much heat is enough and how much heat is "too much?"

At what point does all of the emphasis on having massive amounts of heat and the added cost of heat ex-changers, both short and long term start to border-line RIDICULOUS? I can understand hx in the colder regions as a pre-heating source of course, but does too much heat not damage the integrity of the carpet or its backing, regardless of the type?

Thanks!;)

ac

Not really. Nylon actually melts at over 300 degrees. Olefin / Polyester melts at just under 300 degrees. Studies done in the past by SteamWay International indicated that it's virtually impossible to raise fiber temperatures to over 150 degrees with a high- flow truckmount, regardless of flow temperature.

Basically, it goes like this: If you have higher temperature, you clean faster and use less chemical. If you have a lower temperature, you'll clean slower and use more chemical.

Sure, it's possible to have more heat than you'll ever use or need. For instance, if you buy a dual- wand truckmount that delivers high temperatures at high flow rates and only use it as a single wand system.

From a design standpoint, heat exchanger or fossil fuel heat, having way too much heat for the tasks to be performed can be more than simply a waste, but can also be harder on the system's longevity. The reason is that the system would have to monitor and control that heat difference constantly, which would cycle the controls much more often and cause them to have to be replaced sooner as a result, etc.
 
May 6, 2008
1,557
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GA.
Real Name
D Oxley
Business Location
United States
To prevent wicking, prevacuum, make additional extraction passes and use air movers.

Bud

Bud:

The reason that air movers help with wicking is that they speed up drying to the point that evaporation occurs faster than residues can be carried from the base of the fibers (and the backing), where it remains due to "surface cleaning".

The reason that surface cleaning is more prevalent on Olefin, Polyester, etc., is that it repels water. Because it repels water, much more solution than in Nylon and Wool carpets runs off and collects at the bottom of the fibers. This is one reason that many people turn their pressure down- in order to minimize run-off into the backing, where it pools and waits to be evaporated upward as drying occurs.

The above is also the reason why some people prefer to bonnet clean Berber and other carpets made of Olefin, etc.