How do you know when to use what tool? | TruckMount Forums #1 Carpet Cleaning Forums

How do you know when to use what tool?

Big_Joe

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Hello all! I am new to the carpet cleaning industry as well as these forums which are awesome by the way.

I was wondering how do you know what tool you should use for what job?

If you walk into a job and look at the carpets, what tells you whether you should use the wand, a CRB, or a rotary?
 

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Well Im pretty new to this industry as well but I think first its a good idea to try and figure out what customers you will be serving most and go from there. Commercial and residential can be pretty different.

For residential, CRB and wand can make a good combo.

I would suggest start learning about the different types of equipment and what they can do etc. and try to figure out who will be your main customers and start there.

Others will be able to more helpful im sure. Or try searching the forum for specific questions and start learning that way as well.

Welcome to the industry.
 
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george8585

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Rotary is for Trashed ONLY. I have a T-Rex Jr rotary extractor but only use it a few times a year. Mostly on trashed unoccupied rental properties.

I use a CRB and wand on most jobs but sometimes I will just use a brush and wand if the carpet isn't too old, or soiled.
 
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ACP

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Rotary for heavy urine jobs, or extreme grease loads... on urine imo a water claw isnt necessary if using a 360 or similar tool with very slow wet and dry passes (much faster than water clawing a bunch of spots one by one.

(Ive tested water claw against 360i and could not pull any more moisture with waterclaw after flooding pad, after 360 had done several slow dry passes. Despite no body weight on the 360) Water claw hasnt come out of the truck in almost a year.


For super heavy grease I also prefer rotary since there is soooo much to suspend... I personally feel extracting at the same time as scrubbing works better than scrubbing then letting it sit while you come back and extract. When there is that much grease it pretty much coagulates with the pre spray, so better to not let it settle or even begin to dry out.


Pretty much anything else CRB + wand wins in my book, which is 95% of jobs
 
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Big_Joe

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Yeah I been watchin alot of videos, taking notes, screen shots, and alot of detective work when people decide to hide labels.
Huge shout out to Brown Pro Carpet Cleaning out of Maryland and Courtney for Truman Steemers. They offer alot of knowledge and that's huge! Thank you.

And thank you all here, in general, in this thread replying

With that being said, I'll see videos where 2 different carpets looks the same with dirt and stains but sometimes it's just a wand being used, and sometimes it's a CRB. But I do know there are times as well we're both are used (Id like to know more about that process, Im assuming prespray >crb> then wand) and I'm just tryin to figure out what I should look for to know what to use when.
Unless it's a "eh, I don't feel like using that today" thing.
 

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Rotary for heavy urine jobs, or extreme grease loads... on urine imo a water claw isnt necessary if using a 360 or similar tool with very slow wet and dry passes (much faster than water clawing a bunch of spots one by one.

(Ive tested water claw against 360i and could not pull any more moisture with waterclaw after flooding pad, after 360 had done several slow dry passes. Despite no body weight on the 360) Water claw hasnt come out of the truck in almost a year.


For super heavy grease I also prefer rotary since there is soooo much to suspend... I personally feel extracting at the same time as scrubbing works better than scrubbing then letting it sit while you come back and extract. When there is that much grease it pretty much coagulates with the pre spray, so better to not let it settle or even begin to dry out.


Pretty much anything else CRB + wand wins in my book, which is 95% of jobs
Very interesting to read about your experience with 360i extracting urine from the pad as well as a water claw does. Hard to imagine but I trust you are speaking from experience. Pretty insightful.
 

OxiFreshGuy

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Well let's put it this way, the 360i will probably "flush" the carpet better than a regular wand will. I highly doubt its pulling anything out of the pad except for capillary action. But the difference is you're getting continuous suction passes over that piece of carpet vs a wand dry stroking once or twice.
 
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OxiFreshGuy

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I follow Robs method most times, using a wand for anything above the first floor and a rotary for the first floor. I haven't pulled out the CRB in a long time.
 

DakotaG

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Yeah I been watchin alot of videos, taking notes, screen shots, and alot of detective work when people decide to hide labels.
Huge shout out to Brown Pro Carpet Cleaning out of Maryland and Courtney for Truman Steemers. They offer alot of knowledge and that's huge! Thank you.

And thank you all here, in general, in this thread replying

With that being said, I'll see videos where 2 different carpets looks the same with dirt and stains but sometimes it's just a wand being used, and sometimes it's a CRB. But I do know there are times as well we're both are used (Id like to know more about that process, Im assuming prespray >crb> then wand) and I'm just tryin to figure out what I should look for to know what to use when.
Unless it's a "eh, I don't feel like using that today" thing.
To answer your first question It just comes down to experience with different circumstances...but even once u ha e experience, preference definitely plays a part too...

I don't have a crb yet but from what everyone says and what I've seen they are king when it comes to pet/literal dirt jobs ..pulls so much hair and gunk out...they also are great agitators..but the argument still goes on which is better at agitation, a crb or a 175.....to me it comes down to which u prefer.. personally if u have the room id use crb on residential and 175 on commercial...

Agitation with good chems will make wanding Soo much easier...id rather do the extra agitation step 9/10 times and wand very easy...there will be some jobs that are hardly dirty at all tho and crb would def be overkill.
 
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Jim Davisson

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RE's clean the fiber from all sides while pulling apart the nap or laying it over on itself or various combinations of that. Generally most people wand in 2 directions only towards the exit point of the room. Better wanding is done in 4 or more directions in heavily soiled areas for premium results, just like vacuuming heavily soiled areas. Wands can achieve fantastic results on the order of powered tools when needed if you attack it right and let the stitch of the carpet work for you.
 

J20770

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RE's clean the fiber from all sides while pulling apart the nap or laying it over on itself or various combinations of that. Generally most people wand in 2 directions only towards the exit point of the room. Better wanding is done in 4 or more directions in heavily soiled areas for premium results, just like vacuuming heavily soiled areas. Wands can achieve fantastic results on the order of powered tools when needed if you attack it right and let the stitch of the carpet work for you.
I don't think I've ever witnessed anyone cleaning in more than 2 directions which I find odd. Most of the time the benefits don't outweigh the time spent but gives amazing results when needed on heavy soil level and traffic lanes if you don't have a RE.

I also do stairs and upholstery in 4 directions, all of the time.
Vacuuming is always done in 4 directions for some reason, even at home. Maybe it's the OCD kicking in.
 
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Jim Davisson

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I don't think I've ever witnessed anyone cleaning in more than 2 directions which I find odd. Most of the time the benefits don't outweigh the time spent but gives amazing results when needed on heavy soil level and traffic lanes if you don't have a RE.

I also do stairs and upholstery in 4 directions, all of the time.
Vacuuming is always done in 4 directions for some reason, even at home. Maybe it's the OCD kicking in.
Chop stroking difficult stains while spinning around in a 360 works lol Entry ways cleaned from multiple ways with a wand look better too. Cleaning both sides that are 90° to foot traffic regardless of nap direction is many times a winner as well.
 
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Well let's put it this way, the 360i will probably "flush" the carpet better than a regular wand will. I highly doubt its pulling anything out of the pad except for capillary action. But the difference is you're getting continuous suction passes over that piece of carpet vs a wand dry stroking once or twice.
I think @ACP is stating otherwise...
 

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I follow Robs method most times, using a wand for anything above the first floor and a rotary for the first floor. I haven't pulled out the CRB in a long time.
Are you agitating on second floor and if so, how?

Never heard of Rob's method. Wondering why that would be..I mean I guess I can see using a rotary is like killing 2 birds with one stone; agitation and extraction. And, maybe you don't want to lug a rotary upstairs. But when you go to the upstairs your just wanding because you don't want to lug a crb upstairs also? I am making some assumptions here but what have I missed? Looking to learn something new as always.

Thank you.
 
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OxiFreshGuy

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The assumption is the soil load upstairs on the second and third floors is typically less than the first floor so using a wand is just fine.

On the first floor the extra flushes with the rotary is more practical to flush the heavier soil load.
 

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The assumption is the soil load upstairs on the second and third floors is typically less than the first floor so using a wand is just fine.

On the first floor the extra flushes with the rotary is more practical to flush the heavier soil load.
Oh Ok I can imagine that being true in many cases.

I guess I still like a crb though it makes me feel more confident since my wand is extremely basic wand that I don't think I can expect much from.
 

Jim Davisson

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Assumption is the mother of all fück ups. Evaluate the soil and how it got their first, spread the pile and how deep it is second and attack the soil based on your equipment third. Don't let anyone convince you of percentage of removal once you know the fiber, the type of soil and how to break those bonds. Cleaning is simple when you evaluate the situation.
 
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OxiFreshGuy

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Agreed assumption is the mother of all fudge ups and time with proper experience and wisdom to evaluate critically is always best.
 

Dream Clean

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Being honest with my experiences, you can do a good job on almost anything with prespray and a wand. I never even used or considered a CRB until about 5 years in when I changed jobs. We agitated with a 175 only when the customer specifically asked for it, but we still got amazing results. We ran Matrix Grand Slam for just about every job and spiked it with Prochem Power Burst when it was extra dirty or greasy.

That said, a rotary and a crb will make your jobs come out a lot faster. I'm still waiting to try a rotary on a job before buying one, but the crb saves me a lot of wand strokes and it does great for encapsulation cleaning on a few regular accounts. It's also great for tile and grout cleaning. Scrubs well without the splatter of a 175
 
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Select

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Being honest with my experiences, you can do a good job on almost anything with prespray and a wand. I never even used or considered a CRB until about 5 years in when I changed jobs. We agitated with a 175 only when the customer specifically asked for it, but we still got amazing results. We ran Matrix Grand Slam for just about every job and spiked it with Prochem Power Burst when it was extra dirty or greasy.

That said, a rotary and a crb will make your jobs come out a lot faster. I'm still waiting to try a rotary on a job before buying one, but the crb saves me a lot of wand strokes and it does great for encapsulation cleaning on a few regular accounts. It's also great for tile and grout cleaning. Scrubs well without the splatter of a 175
Kind of inline with what your saying in my very early experience cleaning carpet I feel largely that the chems are doing most of the work. Its crazy to see them go on and the carpet start to look better already. Of course, we perform a lot of labor after the chems but to me they are doing most of the cleaning.

Maybe some others feel this way as well..
 
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