Great Stuff removal??

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Scott W

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#22
I have not found any solvents that dissolve Great Stuff. Chip off as much as you can and if it is a cut-pile carpet, use the scissors. Scissors not suggested for loop carpet.

The other choice is to do a bonded insert. Some guys can do these really quick.
 

yeshuaisiam

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#25
If its embedded forget it. It AIN'T COMING OUT. You can barely wash that stuff off your hands. It's tougher than roof tar to get off. Hopefully it's just some foam "logs" on top, in that case I'd go under it with a razor and try to scrape it. If its smashed in, walk away an tell the custy "it WILL NOT COME OUT".

I've scrubbed my hands with gas, turpentine, kerosene, lye soap, fast orange, and even rubbed them with sand paper for a bit. Still embeds. Just have to wait for skin layers to shed I guess.
 

Brian_g

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#29
I have not found any solvents that dissolve Great Stuff. Chip off as much as you can and if it is a cut-pile carpet, use the scissors. Scissors not suggested for loop carpet.

The other choice is to do a bonded insert. Some guys can do these really quick.
I've been thinking about it and I'm wondering if I just got lucky when I got it out. The spots were heavily walked on and that may have broken it down. Great Stuff isn't Styrofoam; it's a polyurethane based foam. There are solvents used in industry to remove polyurethane foam. But I don't know if they are safe for carpet. Here are some examples
http://www.culver-international-ltd.com/removal_of_urethanes-05.htm

I've looked at several and the theme seems to be they are recommended for nylon and polyethylene but not for polyester and PET. Aren't some carpets made out of PET and polyester? Some of these industrial products are designed to replace MEK and Methyl Chloride. Torrey mentioned that he's had success with PVC cleaner on paint. The active ingredient is MEK, so I wonder if that may be an option. The big question for me is what is safe to use on carpet. Carpet is pretty tough, but when your talking about something that can break down polyurethane, we're not messing around anymore. We need a solvent that can target one polymer, but leave in tact any polymer that might be found in carpet.

I just spray a carpet sample with some Great Stuff, so I'm going to do some experimenting.

It's not rocket surgery.
 

Scott W

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#31

Brian_g

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#32
An excellent experiment. If possible, you might want to try on a few different carpet fibers including nylon, olefin, polyester / PET and the newer PTT / Triexta.

Send me your mailing info and I can provide a few small pieces of carpet and some solvents to try.
Do you know how to do a fiber test to determine if a carpet is polyester / PET?
 

Scott W

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#33
Do you know how to do a fiber test to determine if a carpet is polyester / PET?
Here is a burn test flow chart I designed to help ID fibers. Polyester is rather easy to spot. The one that gives me (and others) the most trouble is telling nylon from olefin. The biggest difference is the odor and I don't have a great sense of smell. So I often go to a chemical test for those two fibers.
 

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Rick J

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#34
Here is a burn test flow chart I designed to help ID fibers. Polyester is rather easy to spot. The one that gives me (and others) the most trouble is telling nylon from olefin. The biggest difference is the odor and I don't have a great sense of smell. So I often go to a chemical test for those two fibers.
I always was under the assumption that nylon sinks, olefin floats. You just need to make sure you have JUST the face fibers. Be sure not to get backing adhesives etc.
Is this not so, Scott?

And, as well when doing chemical tests, using formic acid to test if nylon, I've had some melt quickly, so there is no question. But I've also had many melt very slowly, or only partially. so then I'm unsure. maybe a blend? Do some nylons respond differently?
 

Scott W

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#35
I always was under the assumption that nylon sinks, olefin floats. You just need to make sure you have JUST the face fibers. Be sure not to get backing adhesives etc.
Is this not so, Scott?

And, as well when doing chemical tests, using formic acid to test if nylon, I've had some melt quickly, so there is no question. But I've also had many melt very slowly, or only partially. so then I'm unsure. maybe a blend? Do some nylons respond differently?
Correct about the float test. Be sure that there is no air bubbles trapped in the fibers or that would also make them float. I rub fibers between my fingers under the water for a few seconds.

Nylon will melt with formic acid and should melt pretty quickly. Olefin will not melt. Part of a blended fiber will melt leaving the non-nylon portion behind and unaffected.
 
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#36
Wow, I have only been on this board for a few weeks and the support on here is fantastic! I would like to see the results of your tests Brian. Keep the responses coming.
 

rstrick

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#37
Seriously.

I don't work without a fels bar and scissors on my hip in a cell phone holster.

Even Steve T said that scissors are your best friend!

Scrape out edges, clip out junk, unclog glides etc etc
That's me all the way fels in the back pocket and duck bill scissors in the belt. 90% of all spots never stand a chance.
 

jeffk734

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#40
Fels rocks damn auto correct
 

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