FB Got a call from a realtor today. Their customer brought in a cleaner who used a Rug Doctor to clean

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Nicholas Baker

Got a call from a realtor today. Their customer brought in a cleaner who used a Rug Doctor to clean the carpets on this house they are listing next week. Remember the Rug Doctor holds the most prestigious certification level with the CRI. Needless to say, we will be coming over with our "second tier" equipment on Wednesday to get this carpet cleaned. I just hope somehow we find a way to outdo "Platinum" level equipment.
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Nicholas Baker

Honestly, I can kinda see where the CRI was going with this certification. The Rug Doctor, as a cleaning solution, is actually not a bad concept for the homeowner. If you consider the TACT (Temperature, Agitation, Chemical, Time) carpet cleaning factors the Rug Doctor is a carpet friendly solution. You aren't using a lot of heat which can damage the carpet on a microscopic level, you aren't agitating the carpet heavily which also can damage the carpet on a microscopic level, the chemical used is nearly neutral ph so no worries there. The only factor you have left is time, and here's where it all goes wrong. Time = Money right? Doesn't matter if you're a cleaner or a homeowner your time is valuable. So you're gonna drag this machine across your carpets as fast as possible but this machine wasn't made to work that fast. There is also the factor that this machine wasn't made to restore carpets, only perform maintenance cleans. But most people who rent these machines aren't performing maintenance cleans, they are hoping to get a deposit back or trying to figure out what color their carpet used to be. This is where I disagree with this certification and when I see the CRI label on these things I wonder how big that stack of cash was that the CRI got paid for their accreditation. It just makes me shake my head.