From an ISSA manual

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ratfool

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Apr 22, 2016
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Marlene Slichter
#1
Honestly I am not a fan of back pack vacuums on a regular basis for carpet cleaning. I have volumes of books saying brushes for the vacuum. Then I read this!
Considering I would beg for a CRB or a pile lifter this doesn’t seem right. What do you guys think?


 

Scott W

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#2
Different types of soils end up at different places in the carpet. Larger "litter" items stay on the surface. Any vacuum can pick them up. Although some vacuums will be damaged by picking up paper clips, coins, etc.

Small particle soils filter part way down the carpet tuft under foot traffic. A revolving brush is key part of removing this type of soiling. Usually it is tracked in from outside but some activities can generate this size of particle soiling with-in the building. A break room or cafeteria with food crumbs would be an example. Most of this soil accumulates with-in the first 25' to 50' inside a building. Entry way matting really helps to capture this soil.

The particle soil described above can filter down to the base of the tuft where it is more difficult to remove. Very fine particles may get to this low level rather quickly. Most of the soil at base of the tufts and on the backing gets there because vacuuming has not been frequent enough. It takes time to work down to that level. Suction helps remove this soil. If suction is not strong or the vacuum head is moved too quickly, this soil may not be picked up at all. It just increases and becomes impacted.

At distances more than 50 feet from the entrance or point at which the soil is generated, there is a limited amount of soil. Suction only vacuums including back packs can work faster in this light soil areas. They save time.

Some back pack vacuums allow attachments with a revolving brush head. These can suit all of the situations mentioned.
 

ratfool

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Apr 22, 2016
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Marlene Slichter
#4
Thank you both. I have a shelf of carpet cleaning manuals that all say what Scott just said above. Most of the book I would say is pretty good. It’s a work training requirement. So I’m reading it. I honestly thought the IICRC and ISSA and American rug institute would be on the same page. I guess not.
I see WAY to many CGD carpets with only backpack vacuum use. And although Scott said it better I call them sand boxes. I have to spend hours vacuuming to even start.
There is an auditorium I did in November that I went back to spot a few weeks back. The custodian uses the backpack regularly (probably because of the book). It is literally filled with sand
 

Robert86

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#5
We used the backpack vacs in schools, but in the summer when we did the carpet cleaning, we vacuumed with an upright with a good beater bar. No doubt, that beater bar helped remove more soil from the carpet.

We had a few custodians that dug their uprights out of the dumpster and hung the backpacks in the closet to collect dust.
 

ratfool

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Apr 22, 2016
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Marlene Slichter
#6
We used the backpack vacs in schools, but in the summer when we did the carpet cleaning, we vacuumed with an upright with a good beater bar. No doubt, that beater bar helped remove more soil from the carpet.

We had a few custodians that dug their uprights out of the dumpster and hung the backpacks in the closet to collect dust.
I think I’m a pain in the ass to work. I’m asking them to confirm with ISSA if this was indeed their intent. Honestly I think one MIGHT get away with using a backpack on most occasions. IF a monthly pile lift happened
Another issue I put in my email is felting. Even you truck mount Boys pull out your CRB’s to pull out the hair and crap.
Could you imagine a high use area and never using any type of beater bar? If you can’t I can send pictures.
I’m waiting for ISSA reply.

Marlene
 

Robert86

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#7
I think I’m a pain in the ass to work. I’m asking them to confirm with ISSA if this was indeed their intent. Honestly I think one MIGHT get away with using a backpack on most occasions. IF a monthly pile lift happened
Another issue I put in my email is felting. Even you truck mount Boys pull out your CRB’s to pull out the hair and crap.
Could you imagine a high use area and never using any type of beater bar? If you can’t I can send pictures.
I’m waiting for ISSA reply.

Marlene
Even @Todd the Cleaner super vac has a beater bar

 

ratfool

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Apr 22, 2016
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Marlene Slichter
#8
I still think it’s genius! I bet his arms were REAL TIRED! And the idea felt so!!! Good!!! Like OMG the only thing that would make this better is a beer good! But can’t do it now because I’m not strong enough to drag this thing across the carpet and hold a bottle of beer good!