Dog vomit stain on white nylon carpet

Paradise305

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Jun 25, 2018
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Nick Brereton
Hey everyone. I attempted to clean these dog vomit stains. a nice neon green color with hints of blue mixed in. I read most of the threads involving vomit stains before I went to this job. This carpet is Stanton Style: Oxford street Color: Iced Mint. It claims it is a 100% STAINSAFE NYLON 6 but it wasn't safe from this vomit stain. We also were at this house a few weeks prior to spot clean a few urine spots and after cleaning applied scotchguard to the whole rug. I decided to start with detergent to neutralize any stomach acid and clean the stained carpet fibers. I then used Stain 1 on each spot, gently agitated using a spotting brush then extracted after 5 minutes of dwell time. I also tried Red 1 on one of the spots after and didn't seem to effective. It was much better then we started but I wanted to get it better. I decided to saturate the stained fibers with Stain 1 and walk away. Is the stain going to fade away or am I going to get a call from the customer tomorrow morning? What would you guys have done differently? I didn't have a enzyme pre spray but plan on adding it to my arsenal in the future. Let me know what you think.


 

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wandwizard

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"Stain Safe" or "Stain Resistant" does not mean stain PROOF. My guess is the dog had either eaten some dog food that has food dyes in it or is on dog vitamins that also contain food dyes as many of them do. Mix that with the stomach acids and you can get a permanent stain or one that can be very hard to remove. I would say your one and probably only hope of removing that is with food dye remover using a good food dye stain remover. It will need to be rinsed again and follow with Red 1 or whatever brand you use. I would only attempt it on one stain and see if you get the desired results. Don't go crazy with it. After the first attempt you should see a definite improvement. If no improvement after no more than 2 attempts I suspect it's permanent. I use a wallpaper steamer, but the old damp towel and iron will work. I suggest no more than about 1 minute before checking for improvement. Customer should be advised it may be permanent and the procedure you must perform CAN cause color loss. In fact, the acid from the vomit may already have affected the dye in the rug.

I suspect that rug had some type of stain resistant coating applied. Dog vomit with stomach acid likely penetrated it fairly quickly. The above is what I would do now. I try to use the least aggressive thing first for vomit which would be an enzyme usually. However, if that is food dye from the dog food it still likely would require a food dye remover no matter what.
 

Paradise305

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I understand that the fiber is not stain proof I just find the way Stanton markets it comical. No fiber I have found is safe from a stain. I've found you may just have a better shot at getting it out if it has some stain resistance. But they always make it seem likes its 100% definite thing which is somewhat misleading (I'm sure there is fine print right on the carpet sample board). I appreciate your input. We do use red 1. I usually use a wet rag and iron. Is the wallpaper steamer that much better? I think I'm gonna go pick one up.
 

OxiFreshGuy

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Agreed. Red 1 , steamer or hot iron, soaking wet white terrycloth towel, spray on the red 1, lay the soaking wet towel on top the stain, steam it for 30-60 seconds. Check for transfer into the towel. If its transferring light treat and repeat.

Only do this 2-3 times. Rinse out the spot when done.
 

wandwizard

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I understand that the fiber is not stain proof I just find the way Stanton markets it comical. No fiber I have found is safe from a stain. I've found you may just have a better shot at getting it out if it has some stain resistance. But they always make it seem likes its 100% definite thing which is somewhat misleading (I'm sure there is fine print right on the carpet sample board). I appreciate your input. We do use red 1. I usually use a wet rag and iron. Is the wallpaper steamer that much better? I think I'm gonna go pick one up.
I used the damp rag and iron method for years, but switched to the wallpaper steamer quite a few years back. In the start of food dye removal it used to be to transfer the food dye to the damp rag. Now we're just using heat to accelerate the action of the Red 1 or whatever and rendering the stain invisible although some of it will still transfer to the towel if you use one. With a steamer there is no need for a rag and it works just as fast with less chance of damaging the carpet from an iron that may get too hot or getting careless. To me it's no contest for preferring the steamer. I just put some distilled water in it and place if over the stain. I can walk away from it for just a few minutes if needed and let it work. I wouldn't do that with an iron. I still use my Black & Decker steamer, but I think most are using the Wagner wallpaper steamer these days. The Namco steamer is very close to what I use. Almost the same design in fact. The Wagner has a much larger steam plate so that could be advantageous for larger stains. In my experience if a stain like that doesn't come out after about 5 minutes it's not likely ever going to come out. You can waste a tremendous amount of time if you don't know that. If I'm seeing continued improvement I may work a little more than 5 minutes.
 
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keep it clean

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I used the damp rag and iron method for years, but switched to the wallpaper steamer quite a few years back. In the start of food dye removal it used to be to transfer the food dye to the damp rag. Now we're just using heat to accelerate the action of the Red 1 or whatever and rendering the stain invisible although some of it will still transfer to the towel if you use one. With a steamer there is no need for a rag and it works just as fast with less chance of damaging the carpet from an iron that may get too hot or getting careless. To me it's no contest for preferring the steamer. I just put some distilled water in it and place if over the stain. I can walk away from it for just a few minutes if needed and let it work. I wouldn't do that with an iron. I still use my Black & Decker steamer, but I think most are using the Wagner wallpaper steamer these days. The Namco steamer is very close to what I use. Almost the same design in fact. The Wagner has a much larger steam plate so that could be advantageous for larger stains. In my experience if a stain like that doesn't come out after about 5 minutes it's not likely ever going to come out. You can waste a tremendous amount of time if you don't know that. If I'm seeing continued improvement I may work a little more than 5 minutes.
I always preferred the iron method. But i was using the wagner in comparison. If i had the more compact black and decker I’d probably prefer it over the iron. I just hated the hose and waiting for it to heat up.
 
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wandwizard

Randy Dockins
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I always preferred the iron method. But i was using the wagner in comparison. If i had the more compact black and decker I’d probably prefer it over the iron. I just hated the hose and waiting for it to heat up.
The B & D does heat up pretty fast, but there are two problems just to be honest. First, it has a fairly small plate size, maybe 5 x 10 inches or so, but not much different than an iron I'd say. Second, is the water container size is fairly small. It will still do several spots on one filling even with just a few ounces of distilled water. Tap water will clog it up fairly quickly. The Namco looks very similar, but I have never bought one. The container on it looks like it holds more water, but I don't know how big the plate size is compared to the B & D which is much harder to get these days on E-bay. If my B & D ever stops working I'd likely buy a Namco.

Well, I just went on E-bay and to my surprise, there are more B & D wallpaper steamers than I think I've ever seen on there.
 
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sbsscn

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I always like to ask a bunch of questions first
Is the dog on meds, was he eating something when it threw up or was it hours after it ate and then the vomit? what type of food dry or canned? can I see the food packaging?

If there is a lot of dyes in the food then Id most likely go with a reducer.
Although Red 1 and stain 1 Work red relief and stain magic work better. They just have a more stronger reaction. The red1 and stain 1 work but sometimes it takes them a while to work.

In this case sine you went with an Oxidizer first (which is what I prefer to do unless I know there are Dyes only) then reducer. I would have given the Oxidizer more dwell time and place a UV light on it, the UV light accelerates it.

I might have given it 30 minutes
and then rinse and extract thoroughly and then used the reducer with wet towel or steam blast it with towel. and then rinsed with a tannin remover
 
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