Discoloration when dyeing carpet | TruckMount Forums #1 Carpet Cleaning Forums

Discoloration when dyeing carpet

JakeS55

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Jun 20, 2018
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Jacob Sanchez
Ever had carpet discolor to green or red while doing a full dye on carpet? I used a bottle of RIT taupe and half a cap of pearl grey and had a bit of a reaction to something in the carpet. Like usual, I rinsed the carpet and double extracted in case there was any kind of home carpet cleaner (resolve etc) could really use some advice on neutralizing this discoloration. I tried ammonia based red dye remover and beeline stain free but didn’t get any immediate results.
 

Mama Fen

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Is there a reason you're using a general purpose dye like RIT rather than an acid dye specifically for carpet?
 

Mama Fen

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Just realized that sounded a little rude, lol. I asked, not to condemn you for doing so, but because all-purpose dyes work differently on different types of fibers, and respond differently in the presence of acidic or alkaline chemicals (could there be urine around that doorjamb, where a dog marked his territory?).

All-purpose dyes are made of a blend of "direct" dye and acid reactive dye. They also require higher heat than true acid dyes to set properly. They're great for blended-fiber materials like shirts, sheets, and batchable clothing, but not very good on single-type materials like nylon or pure cotton.

This is because the "direct" component of the dye (which works beautifully on cotton) doesn't adhere to nylon, so that may be what's causing your discoloration - the acid dye component took hold while the direct dye component didn't.
 

Jim Davisson

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While rit will technically dye nylon it doesn't strike very well, but if applied warm will work. So many things can cause dyes to strike funny. We used to push a strip of pH paper on the spot and check the pH and correct it first, then spot dye it back to the color.

In this particular case the green and red areas can be fixed with each other. Red on the green spots and green on the red spots (light blue dye first than light yellow will work fine too). I always recommend starting with all spot dyes about the color strength of Windex first and adjusting from there IF needed. I mix bleach neutralizer and dye set penetrate in with all spot dyes for one step dyeing.

BTW, polyester carpet has almost killed color repair and Kool aid removal entirely.... So much easy money lost forever!
 

JakeS55

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Jun 20, 2018
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Jacob Sanchez
Just realized that sounded a little rude, lol. I asked, not to condemn you for doing so, but because all-purpose dyes work differently on different types of fibers, and respond differently in the presence of acidic or alkaline chemicals (could there be urine around that doorjamb, where a dog marked his territory?).

All-purpose dyes are made of a blend of "direct" dye and acid reactive dye. They also require higher heat than true acid dyes to set properly. They're great for blended-fiber materials like shirts, sheets, and batchable clothing, but not very good on single-type materials like nylon or pure cotton.

This is because the "direct" component of the dye (which works beautifully on cotton) doesn't adhere to nylon, so that may be what's causing your discoloration - the acid dye component took hold while the direct dye component didn't.
All good stuff to know, generally we use RIT dye for most carpet dyes at the company I’ve been at for 4 years. Typically it goes well unless there was something in the fibers previously that would throw off the PH level
 

JakeS55

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Jun 20, 2018
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Jacob Sanchez
Just realized that sounded a little rude, lol. I asked, not to condemn you for doing so, but because all-purpose dyes work differently on different types of fibers, and respond differently in the presence of acidic or alkaline chemicals (could there be urine around that doorjamb, where a dog marked his territory?).

All-purpose dyes are made of a blend of "direct" dye and acid reactive dye. They also require higher heat than true acid dyes to set properly. They're great for blended-fiber materials like shirts, sheets, and batchable clothing, but not very good on single-type materials like nylon or pure cotton.

This is because the "direct" component of the dye (which works beautifully on cotton) doesn't adhere to nylon, so that may be what's causing your discoloration - the acid dye component took hold while the direct dye component didn't.
The acid based dye you are speaking of sounds like it would help out with the ph reaction on the back end. Do you have any specific brands I should try in the future?
 

JakeS55

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Jun 20, 2018
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Jacob Sanchez
While rit will technically dye nylon it doesn't strike very well, but if applied warm will work. So many things can cause dyes to strike funny. We used to push a strip of pH paper on the spot and check the pH and correct it first, then spot dye it back to the color.

In this particular case the green and red areas can be fixed with each other. Red on the green spots and green on the red spots (light blue dye first than light yellow will work fine too). I always recommend starting with all spot dyes about the color strength of Windex first and adjusting from there IF needed. I mix bleach neutralizer and dye set penetrate in with all spot dyes for one step dyeing.

BTW, polyester carpet has almost killed color repair and Kool aid removal entirely.... So much easy money lost forever!
That’s kind of the direction I was leaning. I attempted to neutralize and will check in the morning what happens but if it’s still looking funky I’m going to attempt the spot dye. Thanks for the response
 

Mama Fen

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Jul 18, 2012
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The acid based dye you are speaking of sounds like it would help out with the ph reaction on the back end. Do you have any specific brands I should try in the future?
There are multiple brands of dye out there designed specifically for use on carpet - I strongly, STRONGLY encourage you to look into them and consider switching to a true carpet dye in the future. Not only will the results be more consistent (and, dare I say, professional), they will also last longer. RIT is not a true permanent dye and will slowly fade and degrade with cleanings.

Americolor has great starter kits and instructional videos. Here's their website.