Customer's moving into pet house's

spod

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I'm curious to know the step by step process that provides the best results.

We all get those customers that say there allergic to dog's or cats and there moving into a house where the previous occupants had these pets.

Now let's not turn this into a urine treatment topic. Only hair and dander and oils, or whatever it is that would cause an allergic reaction.

Let's say the house is empty awaiting new occupants.

What I currently do is:

- vacuum north to south, east to west.

- CRB south to north, west to east.

- vacuum again corner attachment for primmiter.

- prespray Enzyme product prespray.

- CRB solution into carpet.

- acid rinse and extract.

Is there any changes I should make?

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Scott W

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That should owrk fine for the carpet. I might boost the prespray with a solvent such as Citrus Solv to help remove oils from the pet's fur.

But there can be many sources of dander. The whole house needs to be cleaned from top to bottom. Light fixtures, wall wash, curtains or drapes, wipe basebaords, and so much more.

Don't forget to change air filters and often the duct work will also need cleaning.
 

Prosteam-sonomacounty

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I'm curious to know the step by step process that provides the best results.

We all get those customers that say there allergic to dog's or cats and there moving into a house where the previous occupants had these pets.

Now let's not turn this into a urine treatment topic. Only hair and dander and oils, or whatever it is that would cause an allergic reaction.

Let's say the house is empty awaiting new occupants.

What I currently do is:

- vacuum north to south, east to west.

- CRB south to north, west to east.

- vacuum again corner attachment for primmiter.

- prespray Enzyme product prespray.

- CRB solution into carpet.

- acid rinse and extract.

Is there any changes I should make?

Sent from my Nexus 4 using TMF Forums mobile app
Sounds good.
Maybe add a few dryers.
Key to allergy cleaning is to be thorough.
This is what I do on every job.

 
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jtsunbrite

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That should owrk fine for the carpet. I might boost the prespray with a solvent such as Citrus Solv to help remove oils from the pet's fur.

But there can be many sources of dander. The whole house needs to be cleaned from top to bottom. Light fixtures, wall wash, curtains or drapes, wipe basebaords, and so much more.

Don't forget to change air filters and often the duct work will also need cleaning.
Completely right its not so much the hair but the oils in the pet hair that gets on everything. Everything must be done, furniture included... Most people are not up to spending on cleaning to this magnitude....
 
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rob allen

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Drop an ozone machine in there for couple hours. But only after cleaning living daylights out of it. A post spray enzyme would help a lot too.
 
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LookNGood

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Sounds good.
Maybe add a few dryers.
Key to allergy cleaning is to be thorough.
This is what I do on every job.


It's tough to use air movers on these jobs when the whole place hasn't been cleaned.

The air movers will dislodge any dander on other surfaces.

That's something I'm sure you don't deal with a lot (having dirty dusty homes)
 

Scott W

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Ozone can be helpful with odors. I doubt that it would do much for dander or other allergens.

Enzymes could work, in theory, but I have not seen any that do much for allergens in actual practice.

One approach that has not been mentioned is to denature the proteins in the allergens. That is what the Masterblend Responsible Care anti-allergen products do. There are products for use in HWE or post cleaning products.
https://interlinksupply.com/index.php?search_val=Anti-allergen
 
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wandwizard

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I also almost always use a citrus booster on those jobs too, but if the enzyme you're using is doing a good job then stick with it. I also do use an enzyme on some of these jobs too, but very rarely. Generally I use my normal carpet presprays boosted with citrus and maybe some Matrix Miracle. I can't find any fault in your over all method. Only thing I do extra is apply a good odor killer like Proliminator or Odorcide fresh scent misted over the carpet with a pump up or trigger sprayer and raked in if there is a heavy dog odor present. Dog hair and dander can smell about as bad as urine and cleaning won't always take care of it no matter how hard you try.
 
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wandwizard

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What I noticed is once the cleaniing method begins the wet dog smell kicks in because of the humidity and it just goes into the air. Even when finished the smell is still air born.



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Some things you can do about it. I find the citrus helps knock down the initial smell and also aids in removing the hair oils associated with these jobs. Matrix Miracle also smells outstanding and can be used to boost your prespray although may not be a good choice to boost your enzyme prespray. You may also use a deodorizer mixed in with your prespray like suggested above. That will knock the smell down immediately and keep it down as you work. I have done that too, just with a different deodorizer. Another thing is to put a good scent deodorizer in with your cleaning solution or in you're metering tank. No need to do this if you put something in your prespray already. You shouldn't have anything but a good smell when done. The scents smell nice, but are very temporary. I very rarely use scents. They will not kill the odor, but some do smell very nice while you're working. Still, I like to apply a post cleaning deodorizer that actually smells good AND KILLS the odor, like I mentioned above, to insure I don't get a call back and that the customer is 100% satisfied. Of course you should be charging a little extra for this type job. Sounds like you do thorough work.
 
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