CRI Approves bonnet cleaning for maintenance.

BonnetPro

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I was speaking with Mark Warner this morning. If you don't know him he helps the IICRC and is
the education manager for ISSA to name a few of his contributions to our industry.

Mark shared this with me. All of you Bonnet cleaners should read this! With help from people like Mark
The tide is changing for bonnet cleaners.

CRI Announces New Maintenance Protocol for Seal of Approval Products
In a significant new development for its Seal of
Approval (SOA) testing and certification
program for carpet cleaning products and
equipment, the Carpet and Rug Institute (CRI)
has introduced a new category for interim
carpet maintenance systems.
According to CRI President Werner Braun, the
addition of an interim maintenance category will
help "fill the gap" between vacuuming and
deep-cleaning systems. "It will be a positive addition to the existing SOA testing
protocols for vacuums, cleaning solutions, extractors and deep cleaning
systems," he said, adding, "Interim systems are here to stay. They serve an
important role in commercial settings in that they are designed not for restorative
cleaning, but for the 'appearance refresher' between cleanings."
He continues, "We've thought for some time that an interim category would
enhance the CRI's SOA program. I am very pleased with what we have to offer in
this new interim testing program."

Interim maintenance focuses on making carpet look good, said Reg Rogers,
Partner/Owner of Carpet Cleaner America and a member of the group that
developed the testing protocol. Interim maintenance removes soil, which
improves the appearance of carpet, and, in turn, prolongs a carpet's useful life.
Types of interim maintenance systems include bonnet, rotary brushing and dry
compound systems, to name a few. Interim methods can be used in both
residential and commercial settings, but are primarily used commercially at this
time.
The new SOA interim maintenance category was developed by the Interim
Maintenance Task Group, a subgroup of CRI's Product Performance and
Standards Panel. As with all of the SOA programs, the interim cleaning protocol
is based upon science and scientific measurements, notes Braun. "There is no
guesswork involved. It's all based upon scientific tests conducted at an
independent laboratory."
The task group membership included carpet manufacturers, cleaning equipment
manufacturers and professional carpet cleaners. "We had a nice slice of the
carpet and cleaning industry pie come together to develop this testing category,"
Rogers said.
In order to pass the interim maintenance test, systems must remove a set
amount of soil without adversely affecting the surface appearance of the carpet.
The system's cleaning solution must remove soil without causing resoiling or
carpet color change.
Another plus of the interim testing, Rogers said, is that the systems are tested on
both cut pile and loop pile carpet samples.
"Since there is a prevalence of loop pile carpet in commercial settings, testing on
loop carpet is a good example of a real world situation," he said.
Rogers added, "The entire Seal of Approval program is a great thing for our
industry. The consumer has nowhere to turn without CRI and its SOA program."
Those interested in submitting their interim systems for Seal of Approval testing
should contact CRI Director of Standards and Specifications Pat Jennings at
[email protected] or 706.428.2123.

www.bonnetpro.com
 

Chris Henry

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Jul 20, 2017
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Bucky Rogers
I think this is more of an empty gesture. Regardless of this declaration, interim maintenance has been carried out by cleaners and accepted by building supervisors.
It reminds me of the expression 'the tail is waging the dog'. The industry has already set the precedent and the industry organizations are now saying we recommend it.
I think bonnet pro is right. The manufacturer has more to influence care and maintenance than the other two organizations.
 
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BonnetPro

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Hi Chris. It is a big deal and this is why. For some the warrenty is not a big deal. But get into larger accounts like the Four Seasons hotel in Philly. I tried to shoot my MiniMax vid there. When the higher ups learned I was using bonnet they scrubbed the shoot. So as the warrenties get re written this allows more of us who service larger corperat accounts to be able to use bonnet instead of it being forbiden by the upper level suites and bean counters that hold the warrenty in a higher regard then the cleanleness of the property. So more work for this segment in the low moisture crowd. Certainly a step in the right direction as the CRI is part of a large carpet manufacture.
 

Chris Henry

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Bucky Rogers
I forgot the CRI is the manufacturers association. So the SOA does have its place for the accounts you mentioned. I am sort of surprised the 4 star hotels don't have in house maintenance for after guest leave a mess.
Most building maintenance surpervisors I have dealt with don't know much about flooring or the care thereof. In rare cases they actually know the manufacturer name of the product because of recent replacement.

The number one factor to building maintenance is cost. That's why encapsulation cleaning is so advantagous to use. It helps lower the overhead to the cleaning company and helps to pass on savings to the customer by keeping the carpet cleaner longer in between cleanings.
I wonder what the machine manufacturers of the encapsulation equipment are going to have to pay to get listed as a CRI SOA system?
 
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BonnetPro

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Dont forget they like cylindrical brush machines, but they also rely on the encap and leave all the dirty liquid in the carpet. The testing process is a little expensive and its pass or fail. The manufacture provides the protocol on how the CRI is to operate the machine. In other words this is how you should perform the cleaning and CRI passes or fails the results.
 
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OldCarpetVet

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Hi Chris. It is a big deal and this is why. For some the warrenty is not a big deal. But get into larger accounts like the Four Seasons hotel in Philly. I tried to shoot my MiniMax vid there. When the higher ups learned I was using bonnet they scrubbed the shoot. So as the warrenties get re written this allows more of us who service larger corperat accounts to be able to use bonnet instead of it being forbiden by the upper level suites and bean counters that hold the warrenty in a higher regard then the cleanleness of the property. So more work for this segment in the low moisture crowd. Certainly a step in the right direction as the CRI is part of a large carpet manufacture.

You can thank Shaw industries and all of the major truck mount manufactures for the hate on bonnet cleaning. They ALL knew far too well that a simple machine like a 175 and a bonnet cleaned carpets just as good as their over priced crap. And weren't having it. I've been around far too long. I know.
 
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keep it clean

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You can thank Shaw industries and all of the major truck mount manufactures for the hate on bonnet cleaning. They ALL knew far too well that a simple machine like a 175 and a bonnet cleaned carpets just as good as their over priced crap. And weren't having it. I've been around far too long. I know.
Remember when they called out Dyson by name and that by using it would void warranty? I do.
 

OldCarpetVet

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Remember when they called out Dyson by name and that by using it would void warranty? I do.

Yep. Sure do. Funny.....A bonnet under an area of carpet for mere seconds "Will damage a carpet. But a vacuum brush roll and CRB both capable of unraveling the shit out of a woven carpet is just fine.

Where is the logic. Pffft. There is none. It has always been about protecting their wallet.
 

Paul Brown

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I was speaking with Mark Warner this morning. If you don't know him he helps the IICRC and is
the education manager for ISSA to name a few of his contributions to our industry.

Mark shared this with me. All of you Bonnet cleaners should read this! With help from people like Mark
The tide is changing for bonnet cleaners.

CRI Announces New Maintenance Protocol for Seal of Approval Products
In a significant new development for its Seal of
Approval (SOA) testing and certification
program for carpet cleaning products and
equipment, the Carpet and Rug Institute (CRI)
has introduced a new category for interim
carpet maintenance systems.
According to CRI President Werner Braun, the
addition of an interim maintenance category will
help "fill the gap" between vacuuming and
deep-cleaning systems. "It will be a positive addition to the existing SOA testing
protocols for vacuums, cleaning solutions, extractors and deep cleaning
systems," he said, adding, "Interim systems are here to stay. They serve an
important role in commercial settings in that they are designed not for restorative
cleaning, but for the 'appearance refresher' between cleanings."
He continues, "We've thought for some time that an interim category would
enhance the CRI's SOA program. I am very pleased with what we have to offer in
this new interim testing program."

Interim maintenance focuses on making carpet look good, said Reg Rogers,
Partner/Owner of Carpet Cleaner America and a member of the group that
developed the testing protocol. Interim maintenance removes soil, which
improves the appearance of carpet, and, in turn, prolongs a carpet's useful life.
Types of interim maintenance systems include bonnet, rotary brushing and dry
compound systems, to name a few. Interim methods can be used in both
residential and commercial settings, but are primarily used commercially at this
time.
The new SOA interim maintenance category was developed by the Interim
Maintenance Task Group, a subgroup of CRI's Product Performance and
Standards Panel. As with all of the SOA programs, the interim cleaning protocol
is based upon science and scientific measurements, notes Braun. "There is no
guesswork involved. It's all based upon scientific tests conducted at an
independent laboratory."
The task group membership included carpet manufacturers, cleaning equipment
manufacturers and professional carpet cleaners. "We had a nice slice of the
carpet and cleaning industry pie come together to develop this testing category,"
Rogers said.
In order to pass the interim maintenance test, systems must remove a set
amount of soil without adversely affecting the surface appearance of the carpet.
The system's cleaning solution must remove soil without causing resoiling or
carpet color change.
Another plus of the interim testing, Rogers said, is that the systems are tested on
both cut pile and loop pile carpet samples.
"Since there is a prevalence of loop pile carpet in commercial settings, testing on
loop carpet is a good example of a real world situation," he said.
Rogers added, "The entire Seal of Approval program is a great thing for our
industry. The consumer has nowhere to turn without CRI and its SOA program."
Those interested in submitting their interim systems for Seal of Approval testing
should contact CRI Director of Standards and Specifications Pat Jennings at
[email protected] or 706.428.2123.

www.bonnetpro.com
There is one 84000 Sf facility I have cleaned for 19 years...it’s been HWE twice in that time...the carpets were replaced 2 years and 8 months longer than their expected lifespan. The contractor who did the initial install at this facility commented while measuring for new floor tiles that he’d seldom seen a carpet that old look that good...I had been bonneting and cbr’ ing it for 10.5 years... the new carpets were installed in 2009...they are past their service life and still look great...extracted once at 1 year old to honor the warranty...and padded, bonneted or crb’ed every since...I’ll be there tomorrow...