Cranberry Juice on wool rug | TruckMount Forums #1 Carpet Cleaning Forums

Cranberry Juice on wool rug

Paradise305

Member
Jun 25, 2018
53
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Nick Brereton
Picked up this rug yesterday after a customer spilled cranberry juice on it. I started by extracting with a wand and then applied stain magic for wool on the spot. Let dwell for 15 minutes then hit it with the wallpaper steamer with a wet rag for a few seconds. The stain started to fade but wasn’t completely removed. We decided to switch to a reducer because we thought it may have been a cranberry cocktail with synthetic dyes rather then 100% cranberry juice. We used red relief for wool. Applied it to the stain let dwell for 10 minutes then extracted. We did this 3 times. It looks 95% better. Now I’m left with a couple yellow streaks/marks. Is there anyway to remove those or am I done here. Any input would be appreciated. Thanks.

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wandwizard

Randy Dockins
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Nov 12, 2008
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I think you're done and will not see anymore improvement. The CSS (Color Stabilizer and Souring Agent) that comes with both Stain magic and Red Relief for Wool is your neutralizer. So, if you used it, those are neutralized. If I'm dealing with a stain like that I try to find the exact drink the customer spilled and see the ingredients. Was it real cranberry juice or juice cocktail for example? The label for juice cocktail says the color is put in it with and I quote, "color added with vegetable concentrate." Some brands may differ and have synthetic food dyes. In other words, I'd say that whether it was natural cranberry juice or had the vegetable concentrate, or food dye it could make a permanent stain, especially on a natural fiber. I think your customer will likely be happy with what you did or at least, they should be. You gave it at least a 99% improvement, just not 100% perfect which is sometimes unattainable. That is definitely a project the customer needs to know the risk ahead of time and I'd make them sign off on it just in case things go south which can literally happen in a few seconds of time. There is ALWAYS a certain amount of risk of color loss, especially with things like wool, cotton, nylon, etc.

One last thought. Sometimes you have to know when to quit. Going too far with a stain can result in disaster turning a very good job, which you did btw, into a very bad job. Realize that those stain removers you used can remove stains that were IMPOSSIBLE to remove before they were formulated and would have been permanent in the past. Quit now and return the rug a hero or keep going and you may go from hero to zero so fast it will make your head spin. For future reference I recommend asking the customer the exact brand and drink. If they still have some ask to see the label.
 
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sbsscn

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Sep 17, 2009
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I think you're done and will not see anymore improvement. The CSS (Color Stabilizer and Souring Agent) that comes with both Stain magic and Red Relief for Wool is your neutralizer. So, if you used it, those are neutralized. If I'm dealing with a stain like that I try to find the exact drink the customer spilled and see the ingredients. Was it real cranberry juice or juice cocktail for example? The label for juice cocktail says the color is put in it with and I quote, "color added with vegetable concentrate." Some brands may differ and have synthetic food dyes. In other words, I'd say that whether it was natural cranberry juice or had the vegetable concentrate, or food dye it could make a permanent stain, especially on a natural fiber. I think your customer will likely be happy with what you did or at least, they should be. You gave it at least a 99% improvement, just not 100% perfect which is sometimes unattainable. That is definitely a project the customer needs to know the risk ahead of time and I'd make them sign off on it just in case things go south which can literally happen in a few seconds of time. There is ALWAYS a certain amount of risk of color loss, especially with things like wool, cotton, nylon, etc.

One last thought. Sometimes you have to know when to quit. Going too far with a stain can result in disaster turning a very good job, which you did btw, into a very bad job. Realize that those stain removers you used can remove stains that were IMPOSSIBLE to remove before they were formulated and would have been permanent in the past. Quit now and return the rug a hero or keep going and you may go from hero to zero so fast it will make your head spin. For future reference I recommend asking the customer the exact brand and drink. If they still have some ask to see the label.
well said
 

sbsscn

Well-Known Member
Sep 17, 2009
2,771
975
113
california
Real Name
Arm Ben
Business Location
United States
I think you're done and will not see anymore improvement. The CSS (Color Stabilizer and Souring Agent) that comes with both Stain magic and Red Relief for Wool is your neutralizer. So, if you used it, those are neutralized. If I'm dealing with a stain like that I try to find the exact drink the customer spilled and see the ingredients. Was it real cranberry juice or juice cocktail for example? The label for juice cocktail says the color is put in it with and I quote, "color added with vegetable concentrate." Some brands may differ and have synthetic food dyes. In other words, I'd say that whether it was natural cranberry juice or had the vegetable concentrate, or food dye it could make a permanent stain, especially on a natural fiber. I think your customer will likely be happy with what you did or at least, they should be. You gave it at least a 99% improvement, just not 100% perfect which is sometimes unattainable. That is definitely a project the customer needs to know the risk ahead of time and I'd make them sign off on it just in case things go south which can literally happen in a few seconds of time. There is ALWAYS a certain amount of risk of color loss, especially with things like wool, cotton, nylon, etc.

One last thought. Sometimes you have to know when to quit. Going too far with a stain can result in disaster turning a very good job, which you did btw, into a very bad job. Realize that those stain removers you used can remove stains that were IMPOSSIBLE to remove before they were formulated and would have been permanent in the past. Quit now and return the rug a hero or keep going and you may go from hero to zero so fast it will make your head spin. For future reference I recommend asking the customer the exact brand and drink. If they still have some ask to see the label.
you said it a heck of a lot better than i
 
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Paradise305

Member
Jun 25, 2018
53
10
8
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Nick Brereton
Yeah I just dropped the rug from the drying rack and tried some CSS on it and extracted with the upholstery tool. Didn't do much. I'm gonna try and stay a hero on this one. You can only see it from certain angles and if your 5-6 feet away you can't see it at all. Thank you guys for your input on this one.
 
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randyisscott

New Member
May 24, 2021
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Randy Scott
I think you're done and will not see anymore improvement. The CSS (Color Stabilizer and Souring Agent) that comes with both Stain magic and Red Relief for Wool is your neutralizer. So, if you used it, those are neutralized. If I'm dealing with a stain like that I try to find the exact drink the customer spilled and see the ingredients. Was it real cranberry juice or juice cocktail for example? The label for juice cocktail says the color is put in it with and I quote, "color added with vegetable concentrate." Some brands may differ and have synthetic food dyes. In other words, I'd say that whether it was natural cranberry juice or had the vegetable concentrate, or food dye it could make a permanent stain, especially on a natural fiber. I think your customer will likely be happy with what you did or at least, they should be. You gave it at least a 99% improvement, just not 100% perfect which is sometimes unattainable. That is definitely a project the customer needs to know the risk ahead of time and I'd make them sign off on it just in case things go south which can literally happen in a few seconds of time. There is ALWAYS a certain amount of risk of color loss, especially with things like wool, cotton, nylon, etc.

One last thought. Sometimes you have to know when to quit. Going too far with a stain can result in disaster turning a very good job, which you did btw, into a very bad job. Realize that those stain removers you used can remove stains that were IMPOSSIBLE to remove before they were formulated and would have been permanent in the past. Quit now and return the rug a hero or keep going and you may go from hero to zero so fast it will make your head spin. For future reference I recommend asking the customer the exact brand and drink. If they still have some ask to see the label.
True that!!!