Chemical Pump Shutoff Valve

Welcome to our Community
Wanting to join the rest of our members? Feel free to sign up today.
Sign up

Pakman

New Member
Feb 5, 2018
28
5
3
Real Name
Justin Easterling
#1
I'm preparing to rebuild my chemical pump on an older Bridgepoint Systems TM. It primes, but then once I set the the metering valves to chemical the metering ball sits between 2 and 4 with my wand valve closed. When I open the wand the ball doesn't typically move much. At times this doesn't happen, but typically it does. My question is, would it be a good idea to put a shut-off valve somewhere in line to keep the high pressure during tile cleaning from reaching the pump? I was thinking an inline ball valve, but if this was a good idea it seems they would have thought to do it from the factory, so I just want to make sure I'm not doing something that I shouldn't.

Thanks!
 

wandwizard

Randy Dockins
Premium VIP
Nov 12, 2008
7,937
2,721
113
Real Name
Randy Dockins
Business Location
United States
#2
What kind of chemical pump is on there? It sounds like you have a bad diaphragm. I believe a bad check valve that stays open can also cause that issue and possibly a bad 3 way chemical valve. Rebuilding the chemical pump should solve the problem.

As far as having a shut-off valve between the pump and the chemical pump it definitely couldn't hurt. If you operate at higher pressures a lot to do tile and grout I suspect you almost certainly will have more problems with your chemical pump w/o a shut off valve. The old style chemical pump was rated for up to 800 psi maximum and frankly I think that is stretching the truth.
 
Likes: Pakman

Pakman

New Member
Feb 5, 2018
28
5
3
Real Name
Justin Easterling
#3
What kind of chemical pump is on there? It sounds like you have a bad diaphragm. I believe a bad check valve that stays open can also cause that issue and possibly a bad 3 way chemical valve. Rebuilding the chemical pump should solve the problem.

As far as having a shut-off valve between the pump and the chemical pump it definitely couldn't hurt. If you operate at higher pressures a lot to do tile and grout I suspect you almost certainly will have more problems with your chemical pump w/o a shut off valve. The old style chemical pump was rated for up to 800 psi maximum and frankly I think that is stretching the truth.
Thanks Wizard. My truckmount is basically comparable to the old Legends from early 2000's and yes I do quite a bit of tile work. It has last step chemical injection. My plan was to rebuild the pump, replace lines, o-rings, and check valves. I did consider the check valve due to the problem being somewhat intermittent. I have also noticed a little water coming from the stem of the selector knob, so I probably need to make some adjustments there as well.

I guess my main concern is I will be starving the pump in a sense, and I wonder if this will cause damage.
 

wandwizard

Randy Dockins
Premium VIP
Nov 12, 2008
7,937
2,721
113
Real Name
Randy Dockins
Business Location
United States
#4
The new GP chemical pumps that are rated for higher pressures have a built in shut off valve. I can only figure the reason is so the diaphragm doesn't get damaged under those high pressures. I can't see any other reason for it really. A hole can develop in the diaphragm so it seems logical to me that shutting it off while working with higher pressures would make the chem pump last longer w/o problems. There is no way you can starve the chem pump. It works totally off the pressure of the high pressure pump.

I replaced almost all of my chemical feed system last year including changing to the new style GP pump. Mine is the lower pressure model that I think is rated for 1500 psi because it has no shutoff valve. Again, I still think that's stretching the truth. I haven't had any problems yet caused by the chem pump itself, but I don't do a lot of tile so I'm typically way under the max pressure limit and my machine tops out at around 1,000 psi anyway. They do make a higher pressure model that's being put on machines more geared for higher pressures that comes with a shut off valve already installed. Personally I think it's a good idea if they would do the same for the 1,500 psi model as well.

Here is a .pdf of the newer General pulse pump. It is supposed to be rated for 1500 psi w/o the shutoff valve engaged and up to 3,000 psi with it engaged. Personally I think it should be engaged if doing anything requiring higher pressures. If I run into trouble with my new pump I may put something similar on mine. http://generalpump.cazarin.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/100152-PulsePump.pdf

https://www.generalpump.com/product/100152/
 

Pakman

New Member
Feb 5, 2018
28
5
3
Real Name
Justin Easterling
#5
The new GP chemical pumps that are rated for higher pressures have a built in shut off valve. I can only figure the reason is so the diaphragm doesn't get damaged under those high pressures. I can't see any other reason for it really. A hole can develop in the diaphragm so it seems logical to me that shutting it off while working with higher pressures would make the chem pump last longer w/o problems. There is no way you can starve the chem pump. It works totally off the pressure of the high pressure pump.

I replaced almost all of my chemical feed system last year including changing to the new style GP pump. Mine is the lower pressure model that I think is rated for 1500 psi because it has no shutoff valve. Again, I still think that's stretching the truth. I haven't had any problems yet caused by the chem pump itself, but I don't do a lot of tile so I'm typically way under the max pressure limit and my machine tops out at around 1,000 psi anyway. They do make a higher pressure model that's being put on machines more geared for higher pressures that comes with a shut off valve already installed. Personally I think it's a good idea if they would do the same for the 1,500 psi model as well.

Here is a .pdf of the newer General pulse pump. It is supposed to be rated for 1500 psi w/o the shutoff valve engaged and up to 3,000 psi with it engaged. Personally I think it should be engaged if doing anything requiring higher pressures. If I run into trouble with my new pump I may put something similar on mine. http://generalpump.cazarin.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/100152-PulsePump.pdf

https://www.generalpump.com/product/100152/
Wow Randy, great info! Thanks for taking the time...I really appreciate it.
 

Ara Klujian

Moderator & TMF Repair Expert
Moderator
Premium VIP
Jun 19, 2008
3,193
191
63
43
Chicago, IL
www.peterklujiancarpet.com
Real Name
ARA KLUJIAN
Business Location
United States
#6
The new GP chemical pumps that are rated for higher pressures have a built in shut off valve. I can only figure the reason is so the diaphragm doesn't get damaged under those high pressures. I can't see any other reason for it really. A hole can develop in the diaphragm so it seems logical to me that shutting it off while working with higher pressures would make the chem pump last longer w/o problems. There is no way you can starve the chem pump. It works totally off the pressure of the high pressure pump.

I replaced almost all of my chemical feed system last year including changing to the new style GP pump. Mine is the lower pressure model that I think is rated for 1500 psi because it has no shutoff valve. Again, I still think that's stretching the truth. I haven't had any problems yet caused by the chem pump itself, but I don't do a lot of tile so I'm typically way under the max pressure limit and my machine tops out at around 1,000 psi anyway. They do make a higher pressure model that's being put on machines more geared for higher pressures that comes with a shut off valve already installed. Personally I think it's a good idea if they would do the same for the 1,500 psi model as well.

Here is a .pdf of the newer General pulse pump. It is supposed to be rated for 1500 psi w/o the shutoff valve engaged and up to 3,000 psi with it engaged. Personally I think it should be engaged if doing anything requiring higher pressures. If I run into trouble with my new pump I may put something similar on mine. http://generalpump.cazarin.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/100152-PulsePump.pdf

https://www.generalpump.com/product/100152/
That will definitely be the next pump I get. Unless the pricing is absurd, I will stick to a fabricated version.