Cheap equipment to buy to clean vents

Carpetguy 101

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Chris harmon
What's a cheap good setup to start cleaning air vents any info would be appreciated thanks
 

Scott W

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The Air Wave duct cleaning system is a good start for residential ducts and dryer vents. The cost is about $800. You would also need an air compressor which start under $200 and go up according tot he power you need. These units use the vacuum of your truckmount or high power portable carpet extractor.
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https://interlinksupply.com/index.php?item_num=AC040
 

brian3180

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The Air Wave duct cleaning system is a good start for residential ducts and dryer vents. The cost is about $800. You would also need an air compressor which start under $200 and go up according tot he power you need. These units use the vacuum of your truckmount or high power portable carpet extractor.
View attachment 81955

https://interlinksupply.com/index.php?item_num=AC040[/QUOTE


So no going up in the attic? Is it a matter of buying more air hose to do longer runs or another system?
 

Scott W

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So no going up in the attic? Is it a matter of buying more air hose to do longer runs or another system?
Different set-ups in different areas; attics, basement or wherever else the units may be placed.

Longer runs can be done with more hose or by opening up the trunk line. This may require a contractor license depending upon where you are located.
 
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brian3180

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Different set-ups in different areas; attics, basement or wherever else the units may be placed.

Longer runs can be done with more hose or by opening up the trunk line. This may require a contractor license depending upon where you are located.

I'm in Texas so no contractor license needed. No Basements. All duct work is in the attic. I get asked all the time about duct cleaning but I shy away from it as I see the Valpak coupons from when I would visit my family in Houston, Tx. I'm north of Houston and there's no valpack hear and I don't think anyone offers it in my Town. I also have no interest going into an attic in the Texas heat. I go into attics for water damage but that's different seeing that you are working over a large hole in the ceiling.
 

BigSam

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I'm in Texas so no contractor license needed. No Basements. All duct work is in the attic. I get asked all the time about duct cleaning but I shy away from it as I see the Valpak coupons from when I would visit my family in Houston, Tx. I'm north of Houston and there's no valpack hear and I don't think anyone offers it in my Town. I also have no interest going into an attic in the Texas heat. I go into attics for water damage but that's different seeing that you are working over a large hole in the ceiling.
In Texas you cannot legally open any part of the system (including the furnace filter door!!) for duct cleaning unless you have an HVAC license. I have verified this information with our attorney and a reputable HVAC contractor.


A Quick Recap of the Laws in Texas that Apply to Air Duct Cleaning
Reference c.1.3 from the TDLR Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Contractors Administrative Rules.
(c) Duct cleaning.
(1) Duct cleaning and air quality testing, including biomedical testing, may be performed by a person or entity that does not hold a contractor license under Texas Occupations Code Chapter 1302 if:
(A) the task is limited to the air distribution system, from the supply plenum to the supply grilles of the unit and from the return air grill to the air handler intake of the unit;
(B) no cuts are made to ducts or plenums;
(C) no changes are made to electrical connections; and
(D) the only disassembly of any part of the system is opening or removal of return and supply air grilles, or registers that are removable without cutting or removing any other part of the system.
(2) Biomedical testing may be performed by a person or entity that does not hold a contractor license under Texas Occupations Code, Chapter 1302.
(3) Biomedical remediation requires a contractor license under Texas Occupations Code, Chapter 1302
 
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brian3180

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In Texas you cannot legally open any part of the system (including the furnace filter door!!) for duct cleaning unless you have an HVAC license. I have verified this information with our attorney and a reputable HVAC contractor.

I still don't need a contractors license in Texas. I can contract HVAC guys all day long.
 

AZHome&Carpet

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I had to turn down two duct cleaning requests this week.....I’ve gotta save up for this kit
 

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I had to turn down two duct cleaning requests this week.....I’ve gotta save up for this kit
There is good money in air duct cleaning but personally I prefer carpet cleaning. We actually are doing a big air duct job tomorrow, we never work on Sunday's but this job is paying well and since the accident not too much money has been coming in.
 
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AZHome&Carpet

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From what I read it’s a money maker, not sure if I’ll like doing it or not. But until works slammed with carpets I’m dipping on toes in here and there. I never mind trying stuff, changing course, or add stuff.
 

Tanman2019

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I have one in a box for $350 plus freight to you from interlink that I won. Never used. I can send you pics of the box. If you are interested call me at 408-205-6232
 

DrummerTW

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I've been cleaning air ducts for the better part of my 27 years in the business and cant imagine doing anything different than what I've done. If you dont mone getting yr hands dirty.. it's much more lucrative than the carpet side by far. $2-400 an hr is tough to beat.
 

AZHome&Carpet

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I definately want to start doing these. I’ve been doing dryer vents but want to do full vent cleans. I have a fairly large portable compressor that came with my service truck. Just have to come up with the funds to get a kit.
 
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DrummerTW

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I get these results without a compressor nor any duct cleaning kit on the market. I use an Olympus portable with 2 hp 3 stage vacs running 30 feet of hose from the machine to an inline filter and then another 60 feet after that. If you keep ur hoses coiled at all times you'll learn to get everything in every area of a line without all that extra shit people try to make you think you need...you'll definitely need to invest an ulv fogger...its a must and will pay for itself in just one decent job. Stay on top of dry filtered dirt making it's way thru the filter tank by running a dust downer. It saves alot of stuff from getting to the vac intake.
 

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mlog65

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Mike Logsdon
I have one in a box for $350 plus freight to you from interlink that I won. Never used. I can send you pics of the box. If you are interested call me at 408-205-6232
I would be interested if you still have it.
 

Mama Fen

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I'm going to bite my tongue, and just remind everyone to check your state's laws about what CAN and CANNOT be done in any air handling system. This includes whether negative air is required and whether or not you must have a license.

Also, it might be helpful to refresh yourself on NADCA's white papers on foggers or liquids of any type in an HVAC system, if you're thinking of getting into duct cleaning.
 

Mama Fen

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For those who might not have it, here's a link to the white paper in question:


NADCA white paper on HVAC systems and chemical application


Some key points to notice:

All antimicrobials (chemicals that make a kill claim against mold, bacteria, viruses, etc) must be used in strict accordance with their label instructions - thus, if the chemical lists use on a "clean, dry, hard surface" and requires "thorough rinsing" after use, then ask yourself if it's possible to use it in an HVAC duct where you cannot reach the surfaces by hand to clean, rinse, or otherwise examine the surface. If not, then you cannot use the product.

All antimicrobials also have a listing of specific surfaces on which they can be used - many of them mention coils, plenums, and other reachable surfaces. This does NOT translate into them being okay to use in ductwork, which (as noted above) cannot be seen directly with the eye or touched directly with the hand to ensure proper dwell time and surface condition.

Generally, a smell in the HVAC system, for example rotten flesh or musty smells, indicates a problem (dead varmint or water damage). To remove the smell, one must first remove the source of the problem. For example, a musty-smelling system has had a water invasion of some sort, which must be remedied in order for any treatment to be effective. Simply spraying a "good smelly" into the ducts will not fix the problem - it is only a short-term cover of the symptom.




Edited to add: NADCA is not a government body, nor do they have the legal power to make laws or enforce them. However, the laws to which they refer in the white paper are Federal regulations that pertain to any and all antimicrobials, and these laws MUST be followed to prevent serious potential consequences.
 
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AZHome&Carpet

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In AZ be careful, on heat pumps you must be a HVAC company to touch coils