Changing the float valve on the Boxxer 421 | TruckMount Forums #1 Carpet Cleaning Forums

Changing the float valve on the Boxxer 421

wandwizard

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Well I had the great fun of changing out the water box float valve on my 421 today. Should've taken maybe 30 minutes. It was more like 10 hours!:mad: Multiple reasons why it took so long and I won't bore you with all the details, but will offer some advice that might keep you from killing yourself. :cool: First off it was a major nightmare getting the old valve off. Multiple calls to Jondon were mostly met with "I'll connect you to technical support." followed by very lengthy music. So I call Hydramaster and ask if there is anything they can tell me that will help me get this thing off. Well, I'm going to be kind and say that neither Jondon nor Hydramaster had any clue about how to make this any easier and their suggestions, or lack of them, were worthless. Jondon had no suggestions period to help. Hydramaster suggested I used large channel locks to grab the float inside the water box so I could turn the pipe sealed fitting on the outside and that was the extent of their help.

To make a long and frustrating story short here is what I wound up doing since there was no other choice. Most of the problem was because the old fittings were on SUPER TIGHT. Me an my brother-inlaw working together could not break it free even with a very solid grip. Only thing left to do was to take a hack saw to the old fitting that connects to the water box and buy new fittings locally. Boy do I wish I had know that to start with!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! This was after sever calls and several hours of trying btw. Cost of new fittings was about 11.00. I found them at Lowes in the plumbing dept.

Moral of this story. If you run into trouble getting the old fittings off your water box so you can remove the float cut that sucker off! Thank me later cause I just saved you hours of frustration. Next go to your local hardware store and buy a 1/2 in. FPT fitting that has 1/2 in. FPT on both ends. Also, buy a fitting that has 1/2 in MPT on one end and a 3/8 in. barb on the other end. (This goes to the incoming water line) Now just secure your new float valve in the water box and teflon tape the outside threads on the float valve. Now put your 1/2 FPT on just by hand, but good and snug. Next put your 1/2 MPT w/ barb on the FPT that is going down to your inlet hose. Sounds easy right? Well it should've been, but believe me it was a nightmare. Hydramaster used 4 fittings where 2 would suffice. The old fittings absolutely would not come apart and it was absolutely necessary to tear up the old float valve to get it out. Doing it the way I describe above you will never have a problem getting it off or changing it out ever again.Thank God! There were other problems caused by the el cheapo float Jondon sold me. I won't buy that particular part from them again. Find somewhere else to get it and be willing to spend more money if needed. The one from Jondon is cheaply and poorly made.

P.S. If you think calling Hydramaster about this will help or Jondon for that matter think again. Don't waste your time listening to their promotions and hold music.
 

wandwizard

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I forgot to mention my brother-in-law is pretty strong and I'm just short of super human. :)
 
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Bexiesbruv

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I know this thread goes back to April but as I just serviced my float valve I thought I would add what I did.
I too noticed how tight the inlet hose was on the barb fitting. I took a pair of vice grips (after undoing and moving the hose clamp) and clamped them on the hose against the barb. I then worked the grips until the hose would turn although it would still not come off. I left the grips on and took a wrench to the fitting and removed the fitting all the while keeping the hose stationary with the vice grips. Once that fitting was off I took a large pipe wrench and used it as a lever for the elbow fitting. Then the thin nut that secures the float assembly to the side of the water box.
Next I took the lid off the waterbox and unscrewed and removed the threaded surround that the lid screws onto.
The float assembly is now able to be removed from the waterbox and serviced/replaced.
I hope this helps someone.

Bex
 
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wandwizard

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I know this thread goes back to April but as I just serviced my float valve I thought I would add what I did.
I too noticed how tight the inlet hose was on the barb fitting. I took a pair of vice grips (after undoing and moving the hose clamp) and clamped them on the hose against the barb. I then worked the grips until the hose would turn although it would still not come off. I left the grips on and took a wrench to the fitting and removed the fitting all the while keeping the hose stationary with the vice grips. Once that fitting was off I took a large pipe wrench and used it as a lever for the elbow fitting. Then the thin nut that secures the float assembly to the side of the water box.
Next I took the lid off the waterbox and unscrewed and removed the threaded surround that the lid screws onto.
The float assembly is now able to be removed from the waterbox and serviced/replaced.
I hope this helps someone.

Bex
Mine was so bad I couldn't budge it even in the slightest. I would've sworn they used loctite or something on all the fittings. I was afraid if I got any more aggressive with it I'd actually wind up damaging the tank. Then I would really have gotten perturbed. Teflon tape is all you really need on these type fittings to make them leak proof and I think it also makes them easier when you have to remove them as well. I'm already having to replace that float I got from Jondon with hopefully a better float. It cost nearly twice as much so I'm expecting perfection. At least I know the way I have it now I can pretty easily remove my old float and replace it.
 

Bexiesbruv

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Mine was so bad I couldn't budge it even in the slightest. I would've sworn they used loctite or something on all the fittings. I was afraid if I got any more aggressive with it I'd actually wind up damaging the tank. Then I would really have gotten perturbed. Teflon tape is all you really need on these type fittings to make them leak proof and I think it also makes them easier when you have to remove them as well. I'm already having to replace that float I got from Jondon with hopefully a better float. It cost nearly twice as much so I'm expecting perfection. At least I know the way I have it now I can pretty easily remove my old float and replace it.

Loctite wouldnt surprise me either. Many times I have been concerned when trying to undo someone elses work. There really is no need for these fittings to be so tight. The only place I dont use teflon is the wand jets. I have had no luck at all with it on there. Just breaks apart. I bought gas approved tape too Last time, I used liquid electrical tape and it has worked really well.

As for the float, Greg at Hydramaster Tech support has said they now supply a much more robust float/assembly
 

wandwizard

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Loctite wouldnt surprise me either. Many times I have been concerned when trying to undo someone elses work. There really is no need for these fittings to be so tight. The only place I dont use teflon is the wand jets. I have had no luck at all with it on there. Just breaks apart. I bought gas approved tape too Last time, I used liquid electrical tape and it has worked really well.

As for the float, Greg at Hydramaster Tech support has said they now supply a much more robust float/assembly
That is what I was told by the guy selling me my new one. I think the main problem is the actual float and not so much the valve part. My new one is a bit over a hundred bucks, but if it solves this annoyance it will be worth it. On the one from Jondon I couldn't get it to stop cycling my fresh water pump no matter what I tried.
 

Bexiesbruv

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I think the combination of the knurled (I am going to call it an adjustment screw) knob and larger nut on the inside just make it unworkable. Perhaps if the threads were finer??? That way they could be more precisely tightened up. The issue is that you need to put it all back together again to make sure it works, or not, as in my case. I will pull it apart again today and try one more time to get it. The other problem of course, is if you tighten it too much you only part fill the water box.
Do you know of any reason not to replace it with a switch? Like the dump tank overflow switch (which pleases itself if it works or not)
 

Randy Herman

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Anybody know how long these things last? I had water shooting out of the top of the box about 7 months ago so i changed it, solved the problem until yesterday and its doing the same thing again. Shouldnt these last longer than that?
 

wandwizard

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Anybody know how long these things last? I had water shooting out of the top of the box about 7 months ago so i changed it, solved the problem until yesterday and its doing the same thing again. Shouldnt these last longer than that?
It should last for a good number of years if it's made right, to begin with. I've seen some that were very obviously not made very well. I would check to see if yours is in there perfectly straight. If it gets out of alignment even a little it will cause it not to shut off correctly and you'll have water shooting out the top of your water box. Also, I noticed on mine that the float itself tends to slide a little too far down so pulling it back a little may help. If that doesn't work you may need a new float.
 

Luky

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Well I had the great fun of changing out the water box float valve on my 421 today. Should've taken maybe 30 minutes. It was more like 10 hours!:mad: Multiple reasons why it took so long and I won't bore you with all the details, but will offer some advice that might keep you from killing yourself. :cool: First off it was a major nightmare getting the old valve off. Multiple calls to Jondon were mostly met with "I'll connect you to technical support." followed by very lengthy music. So I call Hydramaster and ask if there is anything they can tell me that will help me get this thing off. Well, I'm going to be kind and say that neither Jondon nor Hydramaster had any clue about how to make this any easier and their suggestions, or lack of them, were worthless. Jondon had no suggestions period to help. Hydramaster suggested I used large channel locks to grab the float inside the water box so I could turn the pipe sealed fitting on the outside and that was the extent of their help.

To make a long and frustrating story short here is what I wound up doing since there was no other choice. Most of the problem was because the old fittings were on SUPER TIGHT. Me an my brother-inlaw working together could not break it free even with a very solid grip. Only thing left to do was to take a hack saw to the old fitting that connects to the water box and buy new fittings locally. Boy do I wish I had know that to start with!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! This was after sever calls and several hours of trying btw. Cost of new fittings was about 11.00. I found them at Lowes in the plumbing dept.

Moral of this story. If you run into trouble getting the old fittings off your water box so you can remove the float cut that sucker off! Thank me later cause I just saved you hours of frustration. Next go to your local hardware store and buy a 1/2 in. FPT fitting that has 1/2 in. FPT on both ends. Also, buy a fitting that has 1/2 in MPT on one end and a 3/8 in. barb on the other end. (This goes to the incoming water line) Now just secure your new float valve in the water box and teflon tape the outside threads on the float valve. Now put your 1/2 FPT on just by hand, but good and snug. Next put your 1/2 MPT w/ barb on the FPT that is going down to your inlet hose. Sounds easy right? Well it should've been, but believe me it was a nightmare. Hydramaster used 4 fittings where 2 would suffice. The old fittings absolutely would not come apart and it was absolutely necessary to tear up the old float valve to get it out. Doing it the way I describe above you will never have a problem getting it off or changing it out ever again.Thank God! There were other problems caused by the el cheapo float Jondon sold me. I won't buy that particular part from them again. Find somewhere else to get it and be willing to spend more money if needed. The one from Jondon is cheaply and poorly made.

P.S. If you think calling Hydramaster about this will help or Jondon for that matter think again. Don't waste your time listening to their promotions and hold music.
This is fairly old thread, but since lot of TM's have a holding tank( hot box) this topic will never be out of fashion. When I recently changed my float valve, it took me about 40 minutes to do it. Obviously outer double nuts were rusted and hard to remove, otherwise, but I'm glad the job didn't turn i bigger project. Instead of changing floater only, I've opted for the whole valve with brand new fittings, gaskets etc. ( I had one handy ( Mytee brand)
I got almost 1000 hours on my TM so I feel that I need to get spare , just in case
I wish that I can find find one under the $100.
Great description of the repair process @wandwizard.
I had more luck calling random guy or friend who's mechanically inclined than getting some answers from
" esteemed " companies you've mentioned in your post. I wonder how they manage to get so many great reviews ...
 
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