Cat stains! Help! What chems do I use to remove the stains. | TruckMount Forums #1 Carpet Cleaning Forums

Cat stains! Help! What chems do I use to remove the stains.

SteamForceTech1

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Still waiting on my classes and doing a hands on project at my aunt's house. She has a bedroom that has the absolute worst staining and odor from cat urine. Using a TMed machine Black Label, Liquid Alive, Browning Treatment, Matrix All Fiber Rinse, and Matrix Oxidizer. Stain still wont budge. Have read about using the HP40 volume to help. Where do I go next? My boss wants me to be the pet stain and odor removal tech...I want to do my best. I need quick results. No trial and error things. What really works?
 

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OneBlueSummer

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Charlie King
since you already tried all that... peroxide and uv light, or peroxide and plastic on top and time. If you were truly en expert you would have pre set the expectations by letting them know many of the stains are permanent.
 
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SteamForceTech1

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since you already tried all that... peroxide and uv light, or peroxide and plastic on top and time. If you were truly en expert you would have pre set the expectations by letting them know many of the stains are permanent.

Besides the cheap HP40 Volume from a beauty supply store, what chems are available at the commercial stores such as Jon Don I could have my boss buy? And what other uses are said chems good for? Teach me your ways!
 

Todd the Cleaner

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Cat is the worst. Often times you can not remove the odor. Go in with your black light and look at the walls and other things, usually you will find cat spray in more places than just the carpet. Cat is a lot harder than dog to deal with.
 
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SteamForceTech1

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Cat is the worst. Often times you can not remove the odor. Go in with your black light and look at the walls and other things, usually you will find cat spray in more places than just the carpet. Cat is a lot harder than dog to deal with.
Fortunately the problem I'm not having is the abundance of the "Cat Jobs" I need everyone's heavy hitter advice so I can take that to the customer and still upsell and have them happy. The room I Just finished the room still wreaks and apparent stains still visable.
 

mrotto

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couple things here.

Rule #1. If what you see is bad, you can bet its actually much worse. I had a customer I would clean twice a year and she would point out areas where she wanted me to treat for cat urine. It got to the point where I told her that there were actually many more areas that have been affected than what she knew of. Finally when she took the carpet out she could not believe the extent of the damage. She could see from the back of the carpet exactly where the cat went. Proved I was right.

Rule #2. Somewhere, someplace I read that if 20 percent of the carpet is affected, it is more cost effective to remove and replace. So what I would have told your Aunt up front is that from what you see, its time to get rid of it.

Rule #3. in worse case situations, you treat the front and back of the carpet, remove and replace the pad AND seal the subfloor (wood or concrete). In this case, when she replaces her carpet MAKE SURE that the subfloor is sealed. I once had an apartment manager call me and said they replaced the carpet but it still smelled like cat. Well they didnt address the trim and walls but then I asked if they sealed the subfloor and he said no. So now his brand new carpet and pad have cat odor!
 

Luky

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By time you complete bullet points brought up by @mrotto, cost is going to be equal or higher than new carpet replacement. Sealing the subfloor and removing baseboards
( possibly cutting the drywall) is essential to resolving the problem. We'll see, maybe there be an adventurer trying to " fux " it with OSR.
 

Mama Fen

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Still waiting on my classes and doing a hands on project at my aunt's house. She has a bedroom that has the absolute worst staining and odor from cat urine. Using a TMed machine Black Label, Liquid Alive, Browning Treatment, Matrix All Fiber Rinse, and Matrix Oxidizer. Stain still wont budge. Have read about using the HP40 volume to help. Where do I go next? My boss wants me to be the pet stain and odor removal tech...I want to do my best. I need quick results. No trial and error things. What really works?
So far, you've hit it with enzymes, oxidizers, and acids, which are the three leading products to tackle urine.

If there's still a problem, it's for one (or more) of these reasons:

1. Did you use them on top of each other, so that they "cancel each other out"?
2. Did you dilute them properly, give them enough dwell time, and rinse them thoroughly?
3. Did you recreate the penetration - in other words, did you hit the spots where the urine is actually hiding, or did you just graze the surface?
4. Are there more urine deposits that you haven't seen that are contributing to the odor? Check walls, baseboards, tack strips, door jambs, etc.
5. Did your aunt already try to treat the spots before you came with Resolve, vinegar, baking soda, Windex, etc?
6. Cat urine, for reasons discussed at great length elsewhere in the forum, is insidious and difficult stuff to remove. Even the most experienced pro will sometimes come across a cat urine deposit that he simply cannot eradicate without the cost being prohibitive.

Virtually anything can be cleaned... it's a question of whether the cost of cleaning will be feasible versus the cost of replacing.


Rather than throwing everything at the spot and seeing if that fixed it, spend some time researching and educating yourself on how enzymes, oxidizers, and acids actually work on urine - and practice. Find carpet remnants on the roadside waiting for garbage day and grab a hunk. Take cushions from frat sofas on the sidewalk waiting for the Got Junk guys.

Anything you can do to get hands-on experience without a customer hovering over your shoulder will give you confidence and flexibility to "think outside the box".

There is NO ONE WAY TO ALWAYS TREAT URINE SUCCESSFULLY. It simply doesn't exist - if it did, distributors would only carry that product and nothing else, lol. Hence, anything that claims to "always work" or "guarantee success" is suspect. A Ferrari does no good in the hands of a kid with no driving experience.

Your best tool when dealing with urine is knowledge. Understanding what urine is made of, the changes it goes through with time and treatment, how it alters the actual carpet fibers themselves, how heat and humidity alter its impact... it's actually quite fascinating stuff if you're into understanding (to paraphrase M. Violand) not just what time it is, but how a watch is made.
 
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Scott W

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Each case is different. Often some of the odor is coming from places besides the carpet. Maybe cushion, maybe subfloor, baseboards, furniture, HVAC system, any porous surface that can absorb and later re-emit odors.

If you like some deep training on the subject, my manual on successfully treating urine is still available at no cost from Interlink Supply (even though I no longer work there.) Send an email to Nancy Stoker nstoker@interlinksupply.com and ask for it. Give your company name and information as this is not given out to the general public.