By the numbers.......6.6"LX vs 8.4" in series

Ymetimme

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Pulled the original 8.4s after @ 1400 hrs plus. @ 1000 hrs on the second set. I have one more 8.4 that I use for a downline booster I made.
Still using 2009 pump motor from the Recoil . Pump head has been rebuilt a few times . PUMPTEC 205V 500 psi .
Recovery tank is from original 2009 Recoil. Looks like hell but hasn't caved in even with a rear booster or a downline booster.
Down to 3 days a week plus any commercial weekenders. 8.4s will probally outlast this old man.
150' run .View attachment 78819

Man that's great
When you've decided to be done with it let me know I'll buy it it'll probably Outlast me to
 
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Cody G

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Hi Ed. This is Cody from Missouri. I did my first carpet job 3 days ago. Seventy five feet of hose. Customer loved it. The Jag worked very well. I did a t&g commercial bathroom today, 160 feet using a hard surface wand. The machine did well but I messed up with my chems or scrubbing so I have to go back to redo the grout lines, the tiles looked great though. If you remember I am new to this business. Ive also got the Jag strapped down in a trailor.
 

Ymetimme

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Hi Ed. This is Cody from Missouri. I did my first carpet job 3 days ago. Seventy five feet of hose. Customer loved it. The Jag worked very well. I did a t&g commercial bathroom today, 160 feet using a hard surface wand. The machine did well but I messed up with my chems or scrubbing so I have to go back to redo the grout lines, the tiles looked great though. If you remember I am new to this business. Ive also got the Jag strapped down in a trailor.
Cody you're doing great for a new guy just stick with it. it'll all come together I know you're going to make it
 
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Ymetimme

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I had to get in on the picture showing fun that was at the end of 200ft the Jaguar set at 600 PSI
IMG_20180504_133749_765.jpg
 

Ymetimme

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Tim, thats the same type of tile pattern I had today.Thanks for the advice.
Hey no problem happy to help.
When starting out there is a learning curve and you're going to get a few for call backs (or you're not working) but as the years go by that happened less and less just remember to always put a positive spin on it and is part of customer retention. Being humble and willing to fix things makes clients draw close to you cuz believe me most guys won't. And when you fix a difficult problem it makes you a hero!
 

goomer

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It's the overall design that I really like. It's suction is a part of the equation but not the whole thing and that's probably where bias comes in I'm sure if all I was worried about was raw suction.

Too many machine comparisons die in the abyss of vac performance debates, where many other important factors cease to be considered.

You like the Jag because you find the design favorable to your operation, which is a perfect example of how important it is to consider the design of the machine as a whole, and not always hyper-focus on the performance specs.

Sure performance specs are very important, but the more experience you have, the more you will start to understand design benefits and limitations.

On the flip-side, I find the design of the Jag unfavorable to MY operation, in MY market.

This has nothing at all to do with the quality or performance of Ed's machines at all, it simply has to do with the dimensions, and footprint of his machines compared to "classic", "upright" designs.

For my densely populated urban market, it simply boils down to which machine design is easier to maneuver around, down streets, up lots of fooking stairs, down lots of fudgeing stairs, into tight fooking elevators, through tight fooking hallways, and to operate in often cramped units.

The "classic" designs are much better suited for this IMHO, and a machines maneuverability and foot-print are key considerations in such a market.

It's about so much more than performance specs, because trust me, I know enough to know I would love to run the sh!t out of one of Ed's machines.

It is one of the few portable units I would consider running live AF/APO on, and that's coming from a veteran who fooking hates APO units.

That's a HUGE advantage on bigger jobs, and something that has always been a limitation on classic designs IMHO.

My immediate residential market, which is my bread-n-butter, simply lacks the "sprawl" for such a design.

I wish that was not the case.
 
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Ymetimme

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Too many machine comparisons die in the abyss of vac performance debates, where many other important factors cease to be considered.

You like the Jag because you find the design favorable to your operation, which is a perfect example of how important it is to consider the design of the machine as a whole, and not always hyper-focus on the performance specs.

Sure performance specs are very important, but the more experience you have, the more you will start to understand design benefits and limitations.

On the flip-side, I find the design of the Jag unfavorable to MY operation, in MY market.

This has nothing at all to do with the quality or performance of Ed's machines at all, it simply has to do with the dimensions, and footprint of his machines compared to "classic", "upright" designs.

For my densely populated urban market, it simply boils down to which machine design is easier to maneuver around, down streets, up lots of fooking stairs, down lots of fudgeing stairs, into tight fooking elevators, through tight fooking hallways, and to operate in often cramped units.

The "classic" designs are much better suited for this IMHO, and a machines maneuverability and foot-print are key considerations in such a market.

It's about so much more than performance specs, because trust me, I know enough to know I would love to run the sh!t out of one of Ed's machines.

It is one of the few portable units I would consider running live AF/APO on, and that's coming from a veteran who fooking hates APO units.

That's a HUGE advantage on bigger jobs, and something that has always been a limitation on classic designs IMHO.

My immediate residential market, which is my bread-n-butter, simply lacks the "sprawl" for such a design.

I wish that was not the case.
Yeah where I live there's not much Urban in Market the biggest city near me is South Bend Indiana and when I do have high-rise work I just use the Jaguar cub it absolutely rocks cuz it weighs less than 50 lb it's something you may want to look into but if it doesn't work for you I totally get it. people are allowed to like what they like and that's all there is to it!

After all I started out with Bonnet cleaning because that was way I was taught and it ( lot of nightmares! sure I can treat that carpet this got defecation and urine on it let me just throw down this pad spray this magic juice and spin it around for a little bit call back after call back after call back)

Switch to Upright Portables Century 400 Ninja still have 4 laying around I think they were okay units for the time.

Then went gas TM powr Genesis(can't get parts) and Pro chem Cobble Together dinosaur

A lot of people will think that I downgraded switch into the Jag I find it to be the Best of Both Worlds

There is a lot of Versatility for my Marketplace due to the fact that we are cleaning a lot of single resident homes and most runs are under a 150
on the commercial huge jobs I can unload the machine and not have to have those 400/ 500-foot runs (been sued trip and fall we won after 10000 in lawyer fees) I mean don't get me wrong power Genesis was very powerful machine. I've never noticed a difference in cleaning quality between the Jag in it and we've never had a complaint letter about dry time especially with our little giant heater which is way hotter than a heat exchanger.

I really do strongly feel that inexperienced operators get obsessed with power and not there technique

I am absolutely positive that you with any extractor will all clean a noob that has an experience
 
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goomer

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Switch to Upright Portables Century 400 Ninja still have 4 laying around I think they were okay units for the time.


Open one of those Ninjas when you get a chance and take me a few pictures of the inside, especially the vac manifold and space surrounding space.

I should be able to tell if they can be fitted with 6.6 motors.
 

Ymetimme

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Open one of those Ninjas when you get a chance and take me a few pictures of the inside, especially the vac manifold and space surrounding space.

I should be able to tell if they can be fitted with 6.6 motors.

It was tight and I had to change out to a DC rectifier pumptec 207 because the motor is smaller in diameter then the 205 that was in it. I also had to remove the heater. It's actually a rocken little extractor it's my back up to the Jag
 
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Ymetimme

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Nice...I'd like to see pics if you get any.
I sure will next time at I'm the warehouse. I'm pretty proud of it it turned out great it's just an old gray tank Century 400 Ninja but it performs like a modern machine next time I'm out there I'll get you some pictures

And if I can find them on the cloud I took pictures of the build (I know I'm a nerd) I took them on my old phone I'm not sure if they were backed up

Ps I think it has more lift than the Jag but it definitely loses in cfm's and I can notice the dry time is faster with the Jag

Also keep in mind these are not the LX Motors they are the 6.6 2 stage like what comes in a Jaguar cub or the Jaguar 6. 6 also they are ran in series not parallel

Those machines only came with one manifold and plumbing a second one looked like it would be a pain in the butt

My son wants us to do a YouTube build video on another one we have
 

Suction Junkie

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Too many machine comparisons die in the abyss of vac performance debates, where many other important factors cease to be considered.

You like the Jag because you find the design favorable to your operation, which is a perfect example of how important it is to consider the design of the machine as a whole, and not always hyper-focus on the performance specs.

Sure performance specs are very important, but the more experience you have, the more you will start to understand design benefits and limitations.

On the flip-side, I find the design of the Jag unfavorable to MY operation, in MY market.

This has nothing at all to do with the quality or performance of Ed's machines at all, it simply has to do with the dimensions, and footprint of his machines compared to "classic", "upright" designs.

For my densely populated urban market, it simply boils down to which machine design is easier to maneuver around, down streets, up lots of fooking stairs, down lots of fudgeing stairs, into tight fooking elevators, through tight fooking hallways, and to operate in often cramped units.

The "classic" designs are much better suited for this IMHO, and a machines maneuverability and foot-print are key considerations in such a market.

It's about so much more than performance specs, because trust me, I know enough to know I would love to run the sh!t out of one of Ed's machines.

It is one of the few portable units I would consider running live AF/APO on, and that's coming from a veteran who fooking hates APO units.

That's a HUGE advantage on bigger jobs, and something that has always been a limitation on classic designs IMHO.

My immediate residential market, which is my bread-n-butter, simply lacks the "sprawl" for such a design.

I wish that was not the case.
Dead on groomer! This is the reason I went with the nautilus.! I do so many high rises and 3 flats!
 
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Jimsteam

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It was tight and I had to change out to a DC rectifier pumptec 207 because the motor is smaller in diameter then the 205 that was in it. I also had to remove the heater. It's actually a rocken little extractor it's my back up to the Jag
You have touched on what I have considered doing for a few years . Dump the heavy /huge Marathon motor /205v and go with the DC Motor / 207V !
How did this work out for you ? Does the AC /207V have the same performence as what you have now in the Jag which I believe is the 207V also but with the 1/2 HP Marathon?
 

Ymetimme

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You have touched on what I have considered doing for a few years . Dump the heavy /huge Marathon motor /205v and go with the DC Motor / 207V !
How did this work out for you ? Does the AC /207V have the same performence as what you have now in the Jag which I believe is the 207V also but with the 1/2 HP Marathon?
It does perform very well and I liked it quite a bit in that machine
It does not build pressure as quickly as the motor in the Jag or the original pumptec that was in that Ninja but it's so close it's hard to tell when you're using the wand also it's not it's fun to Prime but once his prime that likes it.
I believe the Jag has a Leeson motor which will Outlast anyting else

Does DC motors can burn up without any warning (but I guess any motor can)
 

Jimsteam

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It does perform very well and I liked it quite a bit in that machine
It does not build pressure as quickly as the motor in the Jag or the original pumptec that was in that Ninja but it's so close it's hard to tell when you're using the wand also it's not it's fun to Prime but once his prime that likes it.
I believe the Jag has a Leeson motor which will Outlast anyting else

Does DC motors can burn up without any warning (but I guess any motor can)
Thank you.
Both of my 205Vs use Marathons (I had a pair of C/As at one time) and never had to do anything special if I lost prime . Switch on and wait . They always primed themselves.
Interested in the 207vs for Tile work (Spinner) I use a Water Otter at the present time which works great but also heavy.
Our Cimex has a Leeson and is what the electricians/engineers preferred over any other at the GM plant I worked at . Leeson does make more than 1 grade of motors and has been year and years.
The correct Leeson outlasted any other motor on the floor. Use too run a stone on the armature and replace the brushes for a more hours of use (1000s of hours).