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Burned marble?

blackscell

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Mar 21, 2019
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mike sadal
Hi there guys!

I am new to polishing. I decided to buy a single disc machine and learn to polish my new house. Everything went well, I used only the 800/1500/3000 pad then L5 extra powder.

Everything was fine, it got nice and shiny. Loved it so far.

Then there were some edges I couldn't reach, so someone who gave me tips to help me polish told me to buy a wet polisher, small one. Did so, with small diamond discs. I used the 3000 disc with water on one tile to test it out. Unfortunately, it was not such a great test spot since it's visible in the living room.

It had a roundish mark, I showed this to my friend and he told me to start from grit 50 towards 3000, not skipping steps in between. After I got to pad 500 the mark just seemed to get worse and worse, after showing this to him he told me to stop. It wasn't working for whatever reason.

I redid the spot with the single disc machine, same combo as before 800/1500/3000/L5. The mark is still there, it feels really rough. I have no clue where I have gone wrong.

How would I fix this? And what went wrong?
thumbnail_20190322_033150.jpg
 

PistolPete

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Sep 28, 2014
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Peter Dymond
Looks like you stayed too long in one spot. If you can replace the tile that would be better than trying to level it out.
You could have watched videos on YouTube that show you how to feather out each grit in wider rings.
 
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blackscell

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Mar 21, 2019
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mike sadal
Looks like you stayed too long in one spot. If you can replace the tile that would be better than trying to level it out.
You could have watched videos on YouTube that show you how to feather out each grit in wider rings.
Thanks for the reply. It was probably under 15 seconds that it happened, could it have been that the machine was too fast? Since I put it on max speed.

Could I try to level it out with grit 50 again? I think the cause is also that I didn't use the water from the machine it self, but just a bottle of water and used alot of it in one spot. Due to the speed, most water got blown away and that's what probably caused this?

If I use the polisher's wetness, could I get it even again?
 

PistolPete

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It's hard to tell from the photo but the damage looks pretty deep.
To reduce its appearance means you will have to feather out a much bigger area.
Marble is softer than granite so it doesn't take long
 

Scott W

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Max speed may be the issue. We usually kept speed in the 100 to 600 RPM range with hand grinders. Lower speed for lower grit numbers.

It can be feathered in, but will be some work. Replacing a tile is likely going to be easier.
 

blackscell

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So I am wondering, if I take one tile and polish with the handpolisher from 50/3000 should the shine come on it's own or does it need a powder like L5 3000? Any videos on the 'feathering' out when polishing with harsher grits?
 
Sep 13, 2016
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Steve Gillett
So I am wondering, if I take one tile and polish with the hand-polisher from 50/3000 should the shine come on it's own or does it need a powder like L5 3000? Any videos on the 'feathering' out when polishing with harsher grits?
Starting at 50 grit is way too aggressive. I've been restoring marble, travertine, and limestone for over 20 years, I have rarely had to use anything more aggressive than 220 grit to remove most scratching and etching. 120 grit if its really bad.
Yes, keep your hand polisher down to level 1 or 600 rpms. 165-175 rpms on a floor machine (side-by-side; floor buffer; swing machine). a good progression is 220 grit, 400 grit, 800 grit (sometimes 1800 grit), then powder polish (EMP, or Diamond Renew).
A little practice and it will become second nature. Do not be discouraged by this attempt. We are here to help.
 

jtsunbrite

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Thanks for the reply. It was probably under 15 seconds that it happened, could it have been that the machine was too fast? Since I put it on max speed.

Could I try to level it out with grit 50 again? I think the cause is also that I didn't use the water from the machine it self, but just a bottle of water and used alot of it in one spot. Due to the speed, most water got blown away and that's what probably caused this?

If I use the polisher's wetness, could I get it even again?
pistol pete gave you excellent advice ,, you wont fix that one tile...
 

blackscell

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Mar 21, 2019
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mike sadal
Starting at 50 grit is way too aggressive. I've been restoring marble, travertine, and limestone for over 20 years, I have rarely had to use anything more aggressive than 220 grit to remove most scratching and etching. 120 grit if its really bad.
Yes, keep your hand polisher down to level 1 or 600 rpms. 165-175 rpms on a floor machine (side-by-side; floor buffer; swing machine). a good progression is 220 grit, 400 grit, 800 grit (sometimes 1800 grit), then powder polish (EMP, or Diamond Renew).
A little practice and it will become second nature. Do not be discouraged by this attempt. We are here to help.
Thanks for the reply. What if there are small dents in the marble? See picture below; 800/1500/3000/L5 Extra white pad.

On some spots there are little dents in the marble, probably damaged by the previous owner. Does the floor look any good in your opinion? Did I polish from a too high grit level (800)? I like the outcome, but I feel like it could be better. Even though, it's my first time so I am happy with the results.
 

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Sep 13, 2016
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Steve Gillett
Thanks for the reply. What if there are small dents in the marble? See picture below; 800/1500/3000/L5 Extra white pad.

On some spots there are little dents in the marble, probably damaged by the previous owner. Does the floor look any good in your opinion? Did I polish from a too high grit level (800)? I like the outcome, but I feel like it could be better. Even though, it's my first time so I am happy with the results.
Some diamond impregnating pads can leave an "Orange Peal" appearance. Is this what you are referring to as small dents?
 
Sep 13, 2016
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Steve Gillett
starting with 220 grit resin pads for marble will remove the orange peel. stay flat on the diamond pad/puck. Proceed to 400 grit, then 800 grit. 12 passes with 400 grit will remove the scratch pattern from the 220 grit. 12 passes with 800 grit will remove the scratch pattern from 400 grit. Then use a polishing powder like STONE PRO EMP (Easy Marble Polish) to bring the highly reflective polished finish. Use EMP with a little water to make a white slurry; 9 to 12 passes.
 

blackscell

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Mar 21, 2019
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mike sadal
I will start the process today. So basically I can skip the 1500-3000 pad? Only 220/400/800?

Also, after 800, I do not have a buffing pad or whatsoever. Only pads from 50/3000 for my handpolisher. Which pad would be suitable to apply the powder?
 

blackscell

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Mar 21, 2019
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mike sadal
Anyone?

Also, what do you guys think about the L5 extra? I love shining marble, the higher the better. Should I change to another powder?
 

thefundu

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Aug 12, 2019
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I never knew that a tile can be redone like this. What I knew was only marbles can be redone and tiles just have a little layer so they cannot be. Anyways, thanks for the info!