Bleach Spots on Olefin: Painting?

Jun 20, 2017
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Nicholas Bokas
#1
One of my commercial accounts wants to have some bleach spots fixed on Olefin. I'm fully aware that I can't dye Olefin, and they understand this. I've read somewhere on this forum about people painting carpets, and I can't seem to find the threads. Anyone have any experience with this? I know it wouldn't be a permanent solution but this client is willing to experiment and pay. Thanks in advance!
 
Nov 2, 2014
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Richard Santoro
#2
One of my commercial accounts wants to have some bleach spots fixed on Olefin. I'm fully aware that I can't dye Olefin, and they understand this. I've read somewhere on this forum about people painting carpets, and I can't seem to find the threads. Anyone have any experience with this? I know it wouldn't be a permanent solution but this client is willing to experiment and pay. Thanks in advance!
Honestly this doesn't make sense because olefin is the only "fiber" (I use that word loosely when speaking about olefin) that's not affected by bleach. I'm not talking about delaminating the backing, just the face fiber.

As for "Painting " the carpet. Nonsense. You may be thinking about Dyeing a carpet. But you can't dye olefin. Something doesnt smell right.

In any event you can certainly patch those areas.
 
May 15, 2016
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Corey Bayliss
#3
Honestly this doesn't make sense because olefin is the only "fiber" (I use that word loosely when speaking about olefin) that's not affected by bleach. I'm not talking about delaminating the backing, just the face fiber.

As for "Painting " the carpet. Nonsense. You may be thinking about Dyeing a carpet. But you can't dye olefin. Something doesnt smell right.

In any event you can certainly patch those areas.
This is what I think of
 
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Dec 3, 2012
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#4
If it is truly bleached then cut/patch. But i agree with carpet vet. Olefin is not effected by bleach. Heat is its only enemy as it melts at low temperature. It can though contain blended fiber material like nylon.
Screenshot_20181202-155038_Gallery.jpg
 

Jim Davisson

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Aug 23, 2016
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#5
I have used shapies to recolor CGD nylon that wouldn't accept dye that had no donor carpet available. I have heard of cleaners using acrylic paint when faced with no other option, I want to say Ron Toney even touched on it in a article in cleanfax about it many moons ago, but don't quote me on that.
 

sbsscn

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Sep 17, 2009
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Arm Ben
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#6
One of my commercial accounts wants to have some bleach spots fixed on Olefin. I'm fully aware that I can't dye Olefin, and they understand this. I've read somewhere on this forum about people painting carpets, and I can't seem to find the threads. Anyone have any experience with this? I know it wouldn't be a permanent solution but this client is willing to experiment and pay. Thanks in advance!
Are you sure its Olefin/Polypropylene? This type of fiber is Solution dyed and cannot get discolored by bleach. If you paint the carpet the carpet will be stained and you cannot dye Olefin, cannot be done.

Have you done a burn test ? Are you sure its not Nylon or a different fiber?
 
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Scott W

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#7
Very rare for bleach to harm olefin. It can happen if the fiber is a blend of olefin and something else or if the bleach is very strong.

I know of cleaners using colored markers (Sharpies) to hide color loss. I also have an article from early SCT days with Ed York and Ron Toney on using crayons to recolor olefin.

Not permanent solutions as the color will eventually wear off or clean off, but helpful for a while.

A bonded insert (AKA patch) is the best answer in most situations for color loss to olefin.
 

Johnny Bravo

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#8
As has already been stated Olefin & Polypropylene are not really effected by bleach. In any event you can temporarily shade them with crayons used to mark lumber. You'l need a red, yellow, and blue crayon and know how to mix them to achieve the color you want. Use a blow dryer to heat it up and make it attach to the fibers better.
 

Rick J

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#9
I see quite a lot of cheap olefins damaged by some sort of cleaning agents. Not sure what, as they are already vacated. Whatever it is, it is not like bleach damage on nylon.
It turns the fiber to a purpleish color.
I tried CTI carpet cosmetics recently on one I ran across to see if it would improve it at all. No success.
 

Johnny Bravo

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#10
I see quite a lot of cheap olefins damaged by some sort of cleaning agents. Not sure what, as they are already vacated. Whatever it is, it is not like bleach damage on nylon.
It turns the fiber to a purpleish color.
I tried CTI carpet cosmetics recently on one I ran across to see if it would improve it at all. No success.

That purplish color you see is what bleach can do to these plastic carpets. It's a very faint purplish discoloration.
 
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Nov 2, 2014
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Richard Santoro
#11
Very rare for bleach to harm olefin. It can happen if the fiber is a blend of olefin and something else or if the bleach is very strong.

I know of cleaners using colored markers (Sharpies) to hide color loss. I also have an article from early SCT days with Ed York and Ron Toney on using crayons to recolor olefin.

Not permanent solutions as the color will eventually wear off or clean off, but helpful for a while.

A bonded insert (AKA patch) is the best answer in most situations for color loss to olefin.
Scott....It wasn't that long ago that I quoted something from Ed York here on TMF. You know you've been around this industry a looooong time when we start quoting the pioneers we grew up with in our industry.
 

Scott W

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#12
Scott....It wasn't that long ago that I quoted something from Ed York here on TMF. You know you've been around this industry a looooong time when we start quoting the pioneers we grew up with in our industry.
Those of use that have been around a really long time used to give Ed York advice.



Of course, he never took that advice.
 
Nov 2, 2014
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Richard Santoro
#13
Those of use that have been around a really long time used to give Ed York advice.



Of course, he never took that advice.
Ain't that the truth. I can tell you a story about a man named Rich Arena who owned the largest independent Restoration company in North America at the time. He and a few others went to a seminar that Ed York put on and the seminar was about how to "Get your foot in the door" on commercial accounts.

I remember Rich Arena telling me and my friend Rich Gilbert (who later bought Rich Arena'a company) the story like it happened yesterday. It was hilarious.

Anyway halfway through Ed's pitch, Rich Arena stood up and told Ed
.
"What a bunch of bullshit"!
He went on to tell the class

"Let me tell you how it's done". And then he proceeded to tell him and the class how he pays off the doorman and then he pays off the elevator operator and then he pays off the facility manager and then he says...And THAT is how you get in the door. LOL.

And I can say with complete confidence that that is exactly how you get your foot in the door in New York City. I know. It's what I did.
Ole Ed was flabbergasted.